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-   -   Reflecting highs absorbing mids (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/studio-building-acoustics/1313426-reflecting-highs-absorbing-mids.html)

voodoo4u 3rd June 2020 06:18 PM

Reflecting highs absorbing mids
 
I have a live room that I'm fairly happy with but for the frequencies in the mid range.
I find that reverb tails are a little long in this area and I'd like to absorb frequencies in the 1-4k range without affecting my highs.

I thought that building typical Roxul traps with a reflective surface that would absorb frequencies in the 1-4k range yet reflect above 4k would be ideal. I've looked for charts that will give me an idea of what materials would pass up to 4k yet reflect above that, but I've not had much luck. Thin plywood? Thick paper? Tin foil? Would anyone here have any ideas or suggestions?

avare 3rd June 2020 07:41 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by voodoo4u (Post 14779301)
I have a live room that I'm fairly happy with but for the frequencies in the mid range.
I find that reverb tails are a little long in this area and I'd like to absorb frequencies in the 1-4k range without affecting my highs.

I thought that building typical Roxul traps with a reflective surface that would absorb frequencies in the 1-4k range yet reflect above 4k would be ideal. I've looked for charts that will give me an idea of what materials would pass up to 4k yet reflect above that, but I've not had much luck. Thin plywood? Thick paper? Tin foil? Would anyone here have any ideas or suggestions?

Have a look at Schultz for high frequency cut off and vary the depth of absorbent material for the low frequency cut off.

voodoo4u 3rd June 2020 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avare (Post 14779484)
Have a look at Schultz for high frequency cut off and vary the depth of absorbent material for the low frequency cut off.

Yes, of course, perforated metal. This is exactly what I'm looking for. Thank you very much Avare.

RJHollins 3rd June 2020 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avare (Post 14779484)
Have a look at Schultz for high frequency cut off and vary the depth of absorbent material for the low frequency cut off.

Thanks avare !

:cool:

avare 3rd June 2020 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by voodoo4u (Post 14779668)
Yes, of course, perforated metal. This is exactly what I'm looking for. Thank you very much Avare.

you are welcome. Please note that I referenced using the equations. By lower frequencies, as we are discussing, it maybe more economical to drill holes in plywood, etc. Even with the relatively low amount of holes it is still tedious. Layer the panels to reduce the number of operations of drilling.

voodoo4u 3rd June 2020 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avare (Post 14779907)
you are welcome. Please note that I referenced using the equations. By lower frequencies, as we are discussing, it maybe more economical to drill holes in plywood, etc. Even with the relatively low amount of holes it is still tedious. Layer the panels to reduce the number of operations of drilling.

Yes, that's my finding. A nice finished maple plywood is about a third of the cost of perforated metal and I can control the hole size and spacing whereas with metal, I'm limited to what I can find locally and it seems my choices are few.

avare 4th June 2020 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by voodoo4u (Post 14779925)
Yes, that's my finding. A nice finished maple plywood is about a third of the cost of perforated metal and I can control the hole size and spacing whereas with metal, I'm limited to what I can find locally and it seems my choices are few.

Fantastic! It seems strange about reading about local woods. Being in Ontario there are are only a couple of dozen woods. BC is famous for its trees..

voodoo4u 4th June 2020 12:43 AM

Hey, I grew up in Kitchener. A virtual stone's throw from you and of course, we can both relate to maple. The the leaf, the wood and the syrup.;)

Kyle P. Gushue 4th June 2020 12:52 AM

With wood you can progressively increase the amount of highs reflected by adding coats of laquer to it. They tuned the powerstation main room by ear adding one coat at a time until it sounded right.

This might be worth considering if you feel the room is too dull after things are installed.

I don't have any data that shows the range of frequencies laquer effects, or progessive measurements coat by coat.

Figured it was worth a mention though.