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-   -   Ceiling cloud w/slanted ceiling (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/bass-traps-acoustic-panels-foam-etc/1296388-ceiling-cloud-w-slanted-ceiling.html)

nwtlnts 28th January 2020 05:33 PM

Ceiling cloud w/slanted ceiling
 
My ceiling slants from about 11 feet down to 7 feet. I’d like to hang a 6” absorber above a drum kit.

Should I hang the cloud so that it slants with the ceiling, keeping it parallel with the angled ceiling? Or just keep it flat and levels parallel with the floor above the kit?

Finally- thinking I’ll just use roxul safe and sound batt insulation- any other suggestions what could work better?

Jens Eklund 28th January 2020 06:05 PM

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/stud...ml#post9744020

nwtlnts 28th January 2020 06:26 PM

Thanks Jens- good post!

I still have the question- should I hang the cloud so that it slants along with the ceiling, keeping it parallel with the ceiling? Or just keep the cloud flat and level, parallel with the floor and flat above the kit?

VenVile 13th February 2020 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nwtlnts (Post 14495135)
Thanks Jens- good post!

I still have the question- should I hang the cloud so that it slants along with the ceiling, keeping it parallel with the ceiling? Or just keep the cloud flat and level, parallel with the floor and flat above the kit?

LOL, did you even read what Jens said? He answered your question.

Quote:

The only advantage (apart from possibly esthetic) of mounting an absorber (assuming broadband and not partially reflective) at an angel in the ceiling, is to gain depth behind the panel (and thus better low frequency performance) at one end, while keeping some ceiling height at the other end. If possible: Mount the panel with as much air gap behind as possible (or even better; fill the entire depth, or at least half of it, with wool of appropriate flow resistivity for the given depth), even if it does not result in an angel relative to opposite surface; again; assuming broadband absorption panel.

If reflective (at least for mid and high frequencies); we often need to angle panels, primarily to redirect early energy away from the sweet spot, but also on other areas simply to avoid annoying flutter echo that otherwise often becomes very audible in treated rooms.
Essentially, if you want better low freq absorption, leave the panel flat (seeing as the angled ceiling will perform the same way an angled panel against a flat ceiling would). The side that has the larger air gap will give better bass absorption. So, again, in your case, if you leave the entire cloud parallel to the ceiling, then the absorptive properties will be the same from end to end. But if you leave it flat, the part of the angled ceiling, with the wider distance between the the top of the panel and the ceiling, should give you a bit more low freq absorption.

If you still have doubts, try both and measure the response using REW and a flat omnidirectional mic.

nwtlnts 14th February 2020 03:04 AM

Haha- yeah of course I read it! I just wanted to ask for clarification to be sure - this whole process has been daunting so bear with me :lol:
the thread Jens linked was about angling panels just for the sake of angling them, not so much about treating a sloped ceiling. Seemed circumstances were different enough that I should ask
Hey thanks for answering rockout I need to get the rest of the dang room treatment situated so I can be confident the room I’m measuring is representative of the room I’ll be using. Hopefully with this long weekend I can make some actual measurements

VenVile 14th February 2020 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nwtlnts (Post 14531557)
Haha- yeah of course I read it! I just wanted to ask for clarification to be sure - this whole process has been daunting so bear with me :lol:
the thread Jens linked was about angling panels just for the sake of angling them, not so much about treating a sloped ceiling. Seemed circumstances were different enough that I should ask
Hey thanks for answering rockout I need to get the rest of the dang room treatment situated so I can be confident the room I’m measuring is representative of the room I’ll be using. Hopefully with this long weekend I can make some actual measurements

I completely understand. I've been there myself.

I think some of these pros probably forgot how daunting acoustics can be. And what may seem like obvious "common sense" isn't always so simple and straightforward, or obvious, in the acoustic world. Some of the principles that they now deem simple and obvious, to the yous and mes are head-benders, and takes a while wrapping our heads around. I struggled for a lot longer than I thought I should (or am comfortable admitting) when it comes to certain principles in acoustics and treatment lol.

But, don't let it defeat you; you'll get there.