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Franco the Manco 9th September 2019 02:36 PM

Behringer Multicom MDX 2400
 
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Hi,
I have a 4 channel dynamic compressor (Behringer Multicom MDX 2400) which I use as a limiter, I am looking to 'slice' up in to 4 individual compressors. These would then be connected their individual appropriate power supplies and installed inside 4 active speakers which need program limiters. I need my speakers to be limited as I hire them out and often costumers bruh the tweeters. Does anybody have the schematics of the board inside, or can give me any advice/indication as to how to go about it. I have degree in mechanical engineering but am by no means an electronic expert. Spent 30$ on the compressor so don't care if it breaks.

wrgkmc 9th September 2019 05:19 PM

When you consider they cost involved including the housings and additional power supplies it doesn't make any sense to chop a perfectly good rack unit up into 4 mono compressors. You want mono compressors just buy them. Its far cheaper and less problematic.

You cant just use the same power supply with what you're doing either.
Electronics is all about balance. The components used must match the amount of electricity being consumed "Exactly" There is "no" guesswork involved
When you chop that unit up you'll be reducing the power requirements of each unit to 1/4 of what it used to be. The current power supply is designed to handle 4 compressors, not one. This means you'll not only have to redesign a working power supply for a single module, you'll have to part source it and test it under working conditions.

That alone makes your project a boondoggle. You're clueless on what needs to be done and what its going to cost, plus finding a schematic is unlikely which makes it a touch job for even a professional. You need mono compressors, simply price and buy them. Last optical compressor I bought cost me $15 with shipping as a kit. Took me 30 minutes to slap it together and it sounds great.

You'll also find different compressors have different voicings and are built into cases/formats they are most likely to be used with.
Rack units are typically line level and full fidelity designed to compress or limit full frequencies. They totally suck for something like a guitar or bass run at instrument levels. Not only is are the impedances wrong and signals too weak, they don't trigger at timings useable for those instruments. You're far better off buying the right comp for the right application vs attempting to modify one for that purpose. Again, its a matter of cost and practicality.

Franco the Manco 11th September 2019 08:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wrgkmc (Post 14195652)
When you consider they cost involved including the housings and additional power supplies it doesn't make any sense to chop a perfectly good rack unit up into 4 mono compressors. You want mono compressors just buy them. Its far cheaper and less problematic.

You cant just use the same power supply with what you're doing either.
Electronics is all about balance. The components used must match the amount of electricity being consumed "Exactly" There is "no" guesswork involved
When you chop that unit up you'll be reducing the power requirements of each unit to 1/4 of what it used to be. The current power supply is designed to handle 4 compressors, not one. This means you'll not only have to redesign a working power supply for a single module, you'll have to part source it and test it under working conditions.

That alone makes your project a boondoggle. You're clueless on what needs to be done and what its going to cost, plus finding a schematic is unlikely which makes it a touch job for even a professional. You need mono compressors, simply price and buy them. Last optical compressor I bought cost me $15 with shipping as a kit. Took me 30 minutes to slap it together and it sounds great.

You'll also find different compressors have different voicings and are built into cases/formats they are most likely to be used with.
Rack units are typically line level and full fidelity designed to compress or limit full frequencies. They totally suck for something like a guitar or bass run at instrument levels. Not only is are the impedances wrong and signals too weak, they don't trigger at timings useable for those instruments. You're far better off buying the right comp for the right application vs attempting to modify one for that purpose. Again, its a matter of cost and practicality.





Thanks for the advice.
Would you be able to suggest me a good mono compressor/limiter for the application?(i.e. line level and full fidelity designed to compress or limit full frequencies)
Possibly very small in form factor.
Thanks