Gearslutz

Gearslutz (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/)
-   Q+A with Andrew Scheps (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-andrew-scheps/)
-   -   Mixing in the box (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-andrew-scheps/1262882-mixing-box.html)

Mihi DDL 28th April 2019 07:53 AM

Mixing in the box
 
Hi Andrew,

First of all, thanks for giving us the opportunity to get some insight in your process and thinking. I am a big fan of your work and I really enjoy watching your interviews and tutorials, not only because of the value they offer, but also because of your funny and relaxed style of presenting and explaining stuff.

I think it is so cool, that really high profile mixers, like you, are completely in the box. That leaves the average guys (like me) with no excuses, which is a great thing.

I assume everything you mix is extremely well recorded. Great Mics, great Pres and probably some EQ and compression on the way in.
But now looking at the average bedroom producer: Do you feel like you could mix something in the box even though it just went through an average mic and a budget Interface on the way in?

What would you do differently? More saturation to "emulate" the behaviour of the driven preamps and all the transformers?

Thanks again and have a great weekend!

Michi

AScheps 30th April 2019 09:35 AM

It's a myth that everything I work on is well recorded, that really just isn't the case. I'm very fortunate to work on some records that sound great when they come to me, but a huge percentage of records are tracked in much less than ideal circumstances by people who aren't engineers. It's just a fact of making records these days.

So the good news is that since I often have less than perfect tracks I can give you some thoughts on how to deal with them!

Reverb and room simulators are your friend. Using Trueverb, or UAD Oceanway or any room/mic simulator on drum overheads, bass and guitar tracks (especially acoustics) can get you closer to feeling like the instruments were recorded in a decent room. It takes a lot of experimentation and every song is different but they are really useful tools in the right circumstances.

When I use kick and snare samples it is always to reinforce the original recording. What that means is I don't need to ever hunt for the "perfect" sample that's appropriate for the song, I just have a few samples that give me different things. Attack, low end, length, whatever. They will work on 99% of the tracks I work on without making every song sound the same.

Again, the rear buss. For me this just makes everything sound more energetic and exciting, which makes it less obvious how compromised the recording is.