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-   -   Harrison MIXBUS for post production (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/harrison-mixbus/1205796-harrison-mixbus-post-production.html)

Puffer Fish 9th March 2018 09:25 PM

Harrison MIXBUS for post production
 
I have been searching for information regarding using Harrison MIXBUS for film post production work and am not finding much. I see there is an Ardour plug in for OMF and AAF importing. I also read some cryptic commentary on the video player within MIXBUS maybe not working correctly.

I already own MIXBUS and yes, I could test this stuff out, I suppose, but I do not want to buy a plug in for nothing and I do not want to commit a bunch of time on a client's project to find out these answers or anything else regarding using this DAW for post production if there are other users who can talk about the experience.

If no one else can or will comment on the subject, maybe I will try working on a short project in the spirit of research.

Any information is helpful. Thanks.

Swing 9th March 2018 09:39 PM

Have you checked the Ardour and Mixbus forums? Maybe call over to Harrison, or visit them since you are in Nashville and they are not so far away.

Puffer Fish 10th March 2018 02:28 AM

I heard directly from the Harrison folks. They said MIXBUS was intended for music production, not film. There you have it. They also thought they might make a film-centric version some time in the future based upon requests... so someday. But not right now. : )

PascalC 23rd March 2018 05:15 PM

Harrison + Ardour + Xjadeo = nice package for post prod. imo
For a limited time we can have Harrison Mixbus for 19$

My set

Linux Ubuntu studio 16.04.4 LTS
Harrison Mixbus 4
Ardour 5 (+ xjadeo)
+ Waveform Tracktion 8)
Lightworks
Da Vinci Resolve
Fusion
Nvidia card
AAtranslator via Crossover Codeweavers 17.0.1
Kxstudio repositories for WineASIO


JasPalermo 8th May 2018 03:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puffer Fish (Post 13190362)
I have been searching for information regarding using Harrison MIXBUS for film post production work and am not finding much. I see there is an Ardour plug in for OMF and AAF importing. I also read some cryptic commentary on the video player within MIXBUS maybe not working correctly.

I already own MIXBUS and yes, I could test this stuff out, I suppose, but I do not want to buy a plug in for nothing and I do not want to commit a bunch of time on a client's project to find out these answers or anything else regarding using this DAW for post production if there are other users who can talk about the experience.

If no one else can or will comment on the subject, maybe I will try working on a short project in the spirit of research.

Any information is helpful. Thanks.

If you are on a deadline I'd strongly suggest sticking with a boring mainstream post solution.

Mixbus can technically do some post, however I found that to do everything one might want for a simple post project felt like using a desk chair to reach a shelf instead of a step stool.

Too much of a wobbly balancing act for my taste. Use a step stool.

Puffer Fish 8th May 2018 01:03 PM

I was in contact with folks from Harrison and the simple answer was: MixBus was designed for music, not for post.

I was hoping with their long history of consoles for the film industry, MixBus would have a tilt toward the film industry. Not so. Oh well, it was a nice thought.

JasPalermo 8th May 2018 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puffer Fish (Post 13304261)
I was in contact with folks from Harrison and the simple answer was: MixBus was designed for music, not for post.

I was hoping with their long history of consoles for the film industry, MixBus would have a tilt toward the film industry. Not so. Oh well, it was a nice thought.

It is their first DAW. Cut them some slack, it was probably enough of a challenge without worrying about frame sync, surround matrices, and video codecs. :cool:

Puffer Fish 8th May 2018 09:35 PM

slack cut. I was not bashing them. Just hoping.

bradh 14th May 2018 10:20 PM

You should check out Fairlight, which is integrated in DaVinci Resolve (both the free version and the paid Studio version). It only got added in version 14 and they've recently released the beta for version 15, which adds a lot more features and functionality to Fairlight. Resolve is used by most film studios, initially by colorists but they've done a great job expanding its capabilities so it's now a full-blown NLE with separate-but-integrated tabs for each step of the film/video editing, audio, coloring, and rendering/delivery process.

PascalC 20th May 2018 07:46 AM

sad reynaud gone from gearslutz, i'd like to try Da Vinci on CentOS. (One computer only for this soft) or at least a partition for it.

Puffer Fish 25th May 2018 01:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradh (Post 13316327)
You should check out Fairlight, which is integrated in DaVinci Resolve (both the free version and the paid Studio version). It only got added in version 14 and they've recently released the beta for version 15, which adds a lot more features and functionality to Fairlight. Resolve is used by most film studios, initially by colorists but they've done a great job expanding its capabilities so it's now a full-blown NLE with separate-but-integrated tabs for each step of the film/video editing, audio, coloring, and rendering/delivery process.

I looked into this last summer and there was not information. Maybe I should search again. A Blackmagic rep was all talking it up to me and then I could not find any of the stuff he was talking about. He was probably speaking well ahead of their web site updates...

bradh 25th May 2018 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puffer Fish (Post 13336040)
I looked into this last summer and there was not information. Maybe I should search again. A Blackmagic rep was all talking it up to me and then I could not find any of the stuff he was talking about. He was probably speaking well ahead of their web site updates...

See http://documents.blackmagicdesign.co...ures_Guide.pdf for details on the new features in Resolve version 15, including the Fairlight enhancements.

Puffer Fish 25th May 2018 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradh (Post 13336544)
See http://documents.blackmagicdesign.co...ures_Guide.pdf for details on the new features in Resolve version 15, including the Fairlight enhancements.

Bradh---thank you for the link. The ADR section alone makes this version of Fairlight look like a very useful tool. I need to read further and do some cost assessment, but this looks really good so far. A serious appeal is, I know for a fact that colleagues in the video editing departments, particularly the colorists, are already using older versions of DeVinci Resolve, so I am thinking there will be smoother delivery of working files between departments using this set up. Time and research will tell... : )

bradh 25th May 2018 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puffer Fish (Post 13336784)
I need to read further and do some cost assessment, but this looks really good so far.

Unless you're considering the Studio version ($300) , no cost assessment is really needed: the free version of Resolve has all the Fairlight functionality as far as I know.

djp420 31st May 2018 02:59 AM

I was just tech'd aka sat in a class for DaVinci/Fairlight. It ain't no magic bullet. Didn't appear useful for Post Sound, quick cuts, some fades and other cute tools but in my experience when one thing does a lot more than it should everything suffers.

bradh 31st May 2018 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djp420 (Post 13345783)
I was just tech'd aka sat in a class for DaVinci/Fairlight. It ain't no magic bullet. Didn't appear useful for Post Sound, quick cuts, some fades and other cute tools but in my experience when one thing does a lot more than it should everything suffers.

Which version of Resolve were they using? Fairlight was only introduced in version 14; even then it came with a good amount of post-production tools (mixer, effects, EQ, compression, ability to assign tracks to buses, etc.); version 15 (which is still in beta but stable enough for production work) has additional functionality.

It's important to distinguish between the rudimentary audio tools that you see in the Edit page of Resolve and everything you get on the dedicated Fairlight page. This is one of the features of Resolve: each step of the video production workflow gets its own dedicated page and work area in the app: you have a page for media management, another page dedicated to editing, another for audio (Fairlight), another for coloring, and another for rendering.

You can do basic audio edits (fades, etc.) in the Edit page, but the Fairlight page is where you get all the tools. Details available here: https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/pro...olve/fairlight

There's also a really good video overview of Fairlight in Resolve 15 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufiveWv6Bdk

All of these features are available in the free version of Resolve.

djp420 31st May 2018 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradh (Post 13346189)
Which version of Resolve were they using? Fairlight was only introduced in version 14; even then it came with a good amount of post-production tools (mixer, effects, EQ, compression, ability to assign tracks to buses, etc.); version 15 (which is still in beta but stable enough for production work) has additional functionality.

It's important to distinguish between the rudimentary audio tools that you see in the Edit page of Resolve and everything you get on the dedicated Fairlight page. This is one of the features of Resolve: each step of the video production workflow gets its own dedicated page and work area in the app: you have a page for media management, another page dedicated to editing, another for audio (Fairlight), another for coloring, and another for rendering.

You can do basic audio edits (fades, etc.) in the Edit page, but the Fairlight page is where you get all the tools. Details available here: https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/pro...olve/fairlight

All of these features are available in the free version of Resolve.

I’m coming from a background in post audio and Pro Tools. The version I am referring to is the latest release. The class simply glazed over the magic of Fairlight so I dug deep into the accompanying book. I didn’t think it was a far shot from any other audio editing tool which comes standard Avid or Premiere. Is it useful for a video editor? Yes. Is it a post audio solution? It’s a prep tool.
I am similar to most Pro Tools users where we want something to give Avid Pro Tools a run for their money.
Point here is, and maybe I should have said it earlier is I was under the impression DaVinci was “the magic bullet” for the Post Production process and while it’s color correction utility is bar-none top of the line I was not impressed or inspired by Fairlight. Like I said earlier I have yet to see an all in one product excell in all areas. I hope they don’t wear themselves out too thin.