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guccimanesclone 3rd June 2017 05:45 PM

Trailer studio?
 
What are your thoughts on creating a studio in a mobile trailer? If it was treated right I think it could work, my aim is to be able to record a full 5 peice band but not all at once.

ccg 3rd June 2017 06:51 PM

Is it your band or are you thinking of a commercial business? The vibe could be cool, but I'd worry worry about a space that size. Still...the vibe could be cool and sometimes that's all that matters, especially if you're working on your own music and not expecting to build a commercial studio.

Deleted User 3rd June 2017 07:35 PM

If you were using the trailer as just your control room, I could see it; pull up to a venue, run a snake from the stage to the trailer... maybe. But if you were planning to record, say a drummer, in that limited a space, you would be very challenged by the tight area's boxy acoustics. Too small a space for that. Besides, where would you put the gear?

ibtl 3rd June 2017 07:58 PM

when you're mixing, you just crank it and go for a walk
outside to hear it properly.

guccimanesclone 4th June 2017 01:04 AM

Im thinking of doing it commercially for a while until I can find a better space.

guccimanesclone 4th June 2017 01:07 AM

In regards to the boxyness of drum recordings I figure if I can get enough room to put a couple of inches of roxul in that should take care of that right? I heard somewhere that recording drums in a small treated space would result in a really dead sound which would be ok

Synth Guru 4th June 2017 01:49 AM

A double wide trailer could work.

Drumsound 5th June 2017 10:04 PM

There was a feature in one of the magazines years ago with a guy who built a studio into an Airstream trailer.

Deleted User 5th June 2017 10:46 PM

Qote:"In regards to the boxyness of drum recordings I figure if I can get enough room to put a couple of inches of roxul in that should take care of that right? I heard somewhere that recording drums in a small treated space would result in a really dead sound which would be ok"...NO.
The last time drums were recorded "dead" was "Hotel California"...LOL! Roxul is soundproofing material, this will do nothing for the "tone" or sound quality of the recording space. You need to have enough space around the kit and treat the room with the proper techniques to prevent ( or at least minimize) standing waves. The smaller the room, the more problems you will have with the acoustics of the recording space.

Drumsound 7th June 2017 07:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moonbaby (Post 12662935)
The last time drums were recorded "dead" was "Hotel California"...

That's not even remotely true.

bambamboom 6th March 2018 02:59 AM

I'm late to the party.......


Regarding a dead room and drum sound....

If it's all you have to work with, take a look at the Ocean Way Studios plugin. It's actually a pretty cool way to make your tracks sound like they were done in a bigger room.

Obviously the real thing is better. But you might be surprised at what you can do.

Here's an example - the drum part is around the 3 minute mark. BTW Jim Lill is an awesome dude.



Re the trailer idea,

I'd suggest finding a trailer with a couple of pop-outs. As an example, I have a 26 footer for the family. With the pop-outs if I gutted the interior I could do a 5 pc band tracking session in it. It would obviously be tight, but doable. You can go much bigger than this if you want, but the weight will increase to the point where you would need a decent full size truck to pull it. See this example floorplan below, and imagine that gutted.

https://assets-cdn-interactrv.netdna...5346738347.jpg

Stability may be a bit of a challenge - even with the stabilizer legs down, trailers do tend to sway a lot - you may need to look at add-on solutions to improve this.

In terms of soundproofing, that will take some work to do right, as most trailers have very little, and if it rains, you will hear it on the roof big time. To do really good isolation will be costly and you'll lose a lot of space, dealing with all 4 sides, plus addressing things like the air vents etc. Probably better to do a more moderate job and then be content to find locations that are relatively quiet, and hope that it doesn't rain.

RyanC 16th March 2018 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moonbaby (Post 12662935)
Roxul is soundproofing material, this will do nothing for the "tone" or sound quality of the recording space.

You've got that completely backwards. Any type of insulation can be used to treat a room, but the consistent mantra with studio construction is "insulation is not isolation". In the big picture a couple inches of insulation is not enough to achieve an absorption coefficient of 1 below 500hz, so you are right that this amount of insulation won't be enough to treat a trailer...It takes feet of insulation to start to get that much.

OP: Is there a shortage of studios in your area? I would think that clients would probably pick the trailer studio last...Also if your area is like most US cities, there are probably plenty of studios that aren't that busy and you could rent time there while you prepare to go out on your own.

Outside of the physical restrictions, you won't get much sound isolation- do you have a place to park it? Additionally most places will have zoning ordinances here, it's certainly risky to put much money into this if any neighbor or competitor could make a quick call to the city and have you shut down. I would check those first...