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-   -   Advise to a serious home studio guy (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-mark-needham/1111458-advise-serious-home-studio-guy.html)

Unclenny 9th September 2016 01:46 PM

Advise to a serious home studio guy
 
Mark,

I truly appreciate the opportunity to ask this question as I have never had the opportunity to dialog with someone of your status.

To piggyback on the question from @ diogo_c .....what would be the one nugget of wisdom that you might impart to someone like myself who may never get into a real studio but who is still seriously intent on producing the best possible recordings in that back bedroom in front of a computer screen?

Thanks so much for this.

Mark Needham 9th September 2016 04:02 PM

Advise to a serious home studio guy
 
My studio is on my property at home now and I like to think it is a real studio! Get a computer, a good preamp and mic and a set of speakers that you listen to everything on so you know what a great mix sounds like on them and start making tracks. My first studio was a 4 channel tube mic pre /mixer with a bass and treble control , 2 mics and an old Sony 2 track. Just do it a lot and the other stuff will come.

lucey 10th September 2016 02:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark Needham (Post 12125323)
My studio is on my property at home now and I like to think it is a real studio! Get a computer, a good preamp and mic and a set of speakers that you listen to everything on so you know what a great mix sounds like on them and start making tracks. My first studio was a 4 channel tube mic pre /mixer with a bass and treble control , 2 mics and an old Sony 2 track. Just do it a lot and the other stuff will come.

It's a real studio for sure :)



Mark of all the gear you listed, and given how good the inexpensive tools are these days ... would you agree that monitoring is really the most important tool for a young mixer? To listen, learn and work?


It used to be that Genelec 1031s were close to the low end, or Event 20/20s, or Mackie HR 824s ... now there are $300/pair speakers sold as professional tools and people are mixing on earbuds and headphones.

Obviously a smart person can eventually learn to mix on anything, but physics is physics, and many rooms need a lot of help.


What's your take on monitoring as a tool for the home studio folks?