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-   Q+A with Sylvia Massy - round 2 (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-sylvia-massy-round-2-a/)
-   -   What experiments are you dying to try? (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-sylvia-massy-round-2-a/1103541-what-experiments-you-dying-try.html)

Gideon K 22nd July 2016 02:53 PM

What experiments are you dying to try?
 
Hi Sylvia,

Thanks for taking the time to do the Q&A. In your book Recording Unhinged (which I really enjoyed, by the way - lots of crazy ideas to try), you mentioned the concept of recording an album on a private jet, amongst other left-of-field ideas like when you through a guitar off a cliff, or even tracking all the guitar parts on a battery-powered amp.

At this point in time with so much studio/recording/musical experience behind you, what are the adventures in recording you are dying to try but haven't found the logistics or budget, or even perhaps partners-in-crime necessary to be able to do yet?

SylviaMassy 7th August 2016 03:16 AM

Gas-Filled Chamber Effect
 
I have always wanted to try running audio through different gasses, and record how each gas affects the sound. This would require a pressurized chamber and probably some good fire suppression because there are some gasses that may ignite.

I've had this idea ever since I was a kid, pondering over the affect of helium on a human voice. When you breathe in helium, say, from a balloon, and talk, you sound like a chipmunk. So I asked my teachers: does the helium cause the constriction of the vocal chords, or is it the effect of sound going through thinner air that causes the voice to change? (yeah, I was a weird kid)

I'd like to try sound experiments with helium. I'd also like to try neon, and would use a glass chamber or tube for that, because I believe some high frequencies might light up! Anyone who has similar interests in experimenting with sound and gas please write me. Especially if they have access to a facility with a pressurized chamber. :)

Gideon K 7th August 2016 11:12 AM

Hmmm. Pretty interesting.

Quote:

Originally Posted by SylviaMassy (Post 12060539)
This would require a pressurized chamber and probably some good fire suppression because there are some gasses that may ignite.

Maybe not. I found this video where someone tries a similar sort of experiment simply using a baloon full of CO2. In theory you could try something with balloons full of different gases, or a room full of balloons? Not quite as clinical or lab-level as you might be after though.

Gideon K 7th August 2016 11:17 AM

Also on a related note, you might be interested in this effect of sound refraction through air at different temperatures. The way he explains it makes me really curious to hear what it would sound like to record over a lake.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7RbHBK58h8

bangbang 8th August 2016 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SylviaMassy (Post 12060539)
I have always wanted to try running audio through different gasses, and record how each gas affects the sound. This would require a pressurized chamber and probably some good fire suppression because there are some gasses that may ignite.

I've had this idea ever since I was a kid, pondering over the affect of helium on a human voice. When you breathe in helium, say, from a balloon, and talk, you sound like a chipmunk. So I asked my teachers: does the helium cause the constriction of the vocal chords, or is it the effect of sound going through thinner air that causes the voice to change? (yeah, I was a weird kid)

I'd like to try sound experiments with helium. I'd also like to try neon, and would use a glass chamber or tube for that, because I believe some high frequencies might light up! Anyone who has similar interests in experimenting with sound and gas please write me. Especially if they have access to a facility with a pressurized chamber. :)

I feel like I heard about this being done? Not that there's a gas chamber we used as a drum room or anything, but that air content, or gas being introduced into a recording environment, was changed and documented, at some point.

matt thomas 8th August 2016 04:56 PM

Check out Sulfur Hexafluoride, it has the opposite effect to helium!

Matt