Gearslutz

Gearslutz (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/)
-   Q+A with David L. Morley (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-david-l-morley/)
-   -   Approach to wrting a track (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-a-with-david-l-morley/1093773-approach-wrting-track.html)

empirix 7th June 2016 10:28 AM

Approach to wrting a track
 
Thanks for taking time out for this

So how does one go about writing a track these days in comparison to back in the day (first floor etc)

Were you recording in one take or do you simply compose then arrange etc?

thanks

dlmorley 7th June 2016 01:13 PM

Hi there and thanks for the question
I used to record either to tape or run everything live to DAT. Over the years the computer replaced the tape machine and the DAT but I do still try and use the computer more like a tape machine. I try not to record short sequences and then repeat them. If I am recording a synth sequence i will often tweak it as it is being recorded and run it for the length of the tune. I still mix on my console rather than in the daw. I'll mix to 2 track tape sometimes too.
The actual writing process often starts with just creating a patch on a modular. I still find that a concrete way of moving forwards and getting inspired. Sometimes I do have a clear idea of what I want to achieve or I have a chord progression I like that I start with though. That side varies.
One thing that I always do though is leave a finished piece for quite a while before listening again. Months sometimes. Then when I first listen to it, I know instantly if it works for me or not.

empirix 7th June 2016 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dlmorley (Post 11947751)
Hi there and thanks for the question
I used to record either to tape or run everything live to DAT. Over the years the computer replaced the tape machine and the DAT but I do still try and use the computer more like a tape machine. I try not to record short sequences and then repeat them. If I am recording a synth sequence i will often tweak it as it is being recorded and run it for the length of the tune. I still mix on my console rather than in the daw. I'll mix to 2 track tape sometimes too.
The actual writing process often starts with just creating a patch on a modular. I still find that a concrete way of moving forwards and getting inspired. Sometimes I do have a clear idea of what I want to achieve or I have a chord progression I like that I start with though. That side varies.
One thing that I always do though is leave a finished piece for quite a while before listening again. Months sometimes. Then when I first listen to it, I know instantly if it works for me or not.

Nice one for the insight. Leaving the track for a while and then coming back to listen is quite an epic point, hard to do (for me). cheers

crufty 9th June 2016 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dlmorley (Post 11947751)
Then when I first listen to it, I know instantly if it works for me or not.

Thanks for taking time for Q&A David!

From the ground zero 'have an idea' to the 'this works' calculus, could you take a moment to describe how a potential audience fits in w/your process (if they do at all)?

dlmorley 11th June 2016 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crufty (Post 11952628)
Thanks for taking time for Q&A David!

From the ground zero 'have an idea' to the 'this works' calculus, could you take a moment to describe how a potential audience fits in w/your process (if they do at all)?

Hi there
I honestly don't try and think of any potential audience. I am clear that my musical world is quite small in the greater scheme of things and for people to like what I do, they probably appreciate most of things I release or at least enjoy what I am trying to say. So I try to make music I like.
I would say the only thing I feel responsible to any buyers for is quality and originality. Does it reach a level that I am happy with, have I got everything I can get out of the idea and is it original?
If I fail on those 3 points, I would work some more on it and change it or abandon it.
Hope that answers the question somewhat?
Cheers
David