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Most Hollywood movies use location sound? Modular Synthesizers
Old 6th March 2014
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Most Hollywood movies use location sound?

I know this question may be weird, but my boss insists that most Hollywood movies don't use locational sound, they use ADR. However, I don't think so, cause every time I go to theaters I can hear location noise from dialogue, also the 'jump' to ADR is so obvious!!
Old 6th March 2014
  #2
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nzl62's Avatar
 

It varies greatly. Its wrong to state that MOST films replace everything. I'd say MOST use production where they can.
Old 6th March 2014
  #3
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dr.sound's Avatar
 

Your Boss is wrong.
Old 6th March 2014
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kei_siuip View Post
also the 'jump' to ADR is so obvious!!
Only the obvious ones are obvious.
Old 8th March 2014
  #5
Here for the gear
 

Yeah, bringing actors into ADR is a challenge, matching the intensity, emotion, etc. of the scene as well when they're stuck in a room with a mic with none of the same issues surrounding them from the film. It is much preferred to use location sound over ADR when possible.

Also depends on the type of film, therefore where you're shooting.
Old 8th March 2014
  #6
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Henchman's Avatar
Your boss has no clue at all.
Old 8th March 2014
  #7
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JSt0rm's Avatar
But you should never TELL your boss he is wrong
Old 8th March 2014
  #8
Gear Head
 
soundconsort's Avatar
 

Gonna have to disagree with your boss. I find it's usually amateur or very low-budget productions that save all the dialogue for ADR, because they either don't have someone to do location sound or they're just too lazy to record sound on set :p
Old 8th March 2014
  #9
hey, kei

I see that you are located in HK.
your boss may come from the old generation of HK film making where the entire film is ADR'd. But today HK film follow's hollywood style in that they no longer adr entire films, unless they are doing a mandarin dub for china release.
Old 8th March 2014
  #10
Gear Maniac
 

I would say today's films use more actual location sound than ever before, partly because the mics have gotten better, partly because the technique has gotten better, partly because the post has gotten better, but also because everybody's in a hurry and wants to avoid ADR. This is particularly true with TV.

But there are still lots of films that use a great deal of ADR, particularly action films with explosions, wind effects, and other location-related problems that can't be easily salvaged.
Old 8th March 2014
  #11
Only in Italy.
Old 8th March 2014
  #12
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gsilbers's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nzl62 View Post
It varies greatly. Its wrong to state that MOST films replace everything. I'd say MOST use production where they can.
agree.

also, if the movie goes later on TV broadcast it will have additional TV ADR to remove bad words. make that movie wolf of wall street or street kings and there you go.. more ADR than production sound

there is that myth hollywood movies is all ADR. maybe from shwarzenneger days ?
Old 8th March 2014
  #13
Gear Maniac
 

I just finished watching American Hustle and to me it sounded like completely location sound apart from, obviously, the voiceover parts. Then I check the credits and I see 4 ADR mixers credited..They surely did a good job.
Old 8th March 2014
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oscarproducer View Post
I just finished watching American Hustle and to me it sounded like completely location sound apart from, obviously, the voiceover parts. Then I check the credits and I see 4 ADR mixers credited..They surely did a good job.
I've also seen this and I think there are only few lines are ADR!
Old 8th March 2014
  #15
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhuang View Post
hey, kei

I see that you are located in HK.
your boss may come from the old generation of HK film making where the entire film is ADR'd. But today HK film follow's hollywood style in that they no longer adr entire films, unless they are doing a mandarin dub for china release.
He is not old generation but I don't know why he has this idea.
Well, not only him, some HK directors also think that most Hollywood productions use ADR. They always argue why ADR is doing so Fxxking good in US.
IMO, most HK directors don't pay so much attention on location sound recording, also, most HK location audio men are NOT professional!!
They always record 3-4 tracks at the same time but still noisy whatever they use lav or boom.
Old 8th March 2014
  #16
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Henchman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by oscarproducer View Post
I just finished watching American Hustle and to me it sounded like completely location sound apart from, obviously, the voiceover parts. Then I check the credits and I see 4 ADR mixers credited..They surely did a good job.
There are only a few lines. But most likely each one was a different actor, different t location
Old 8th March 2014
  #17
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Henchman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kei_siuip View Post
He is not old generation but I don't know why he has this idea.
Well, not only him, some HK directors also think that most Hollywood productions use ADR. They always argue why ADR is doing so Fxxking good in US.
IMO, most HK directors don't pay so much attention on location sound recording, also, most HK location audio men are NOT professional!!
They always record 3-4 tracks at the same time but still noisy whatever they use lav or boom.
Don't underestimate the value of a god dialog re-recording mixer.
Some productions sound good in spite of the location sound guy.
Old 8th March 2014
  #18
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PatrickFaith's Avatar
 

From a finance costing viewpoint the "most" word is a bit to vague since so much stuff goes on in Hollywood. U need to break the films down by genre, then by distribution approaches. For example in the Animated blockbuster category, most voice is done in post. In the superhero blockbuster I'd lean to most is done in post ( i.e. Especially when major characters are vfx). For high end indie drama (I.e. Woody Allen films), very little done in post. the ratio is also normally modified by the directors work approach. This is all worked out in detail as the film is costed as it relates to distribution (ie since broadcast only work has very tight schedules/budget so way less ADR, things like feature films with major openings with a perfectionist director will have large ADR budgets).
Old 8th March 2014
  #19
Gear Maniac
 

I've seen Wolf of Wall Street today and I think the mixing of dialogue is so great!
Mostly are location sound, am I right?
However, in the office where Leo using a microphone giving a speech to his men,
is the microphone effect was recorded on location?
Old 8th March 2014
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Fleischman View Post
Only in Italy.
And Russia, as well...
Old 8th March 2014
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kei_siuip View Post
I've seen Wolf of Wall Street today and I think the mixing of dialogue is so great!
Mostly are location sound, am I right?
However, in the office where Leo using a microphone giving a speech to his men,
is the microphone effect was recorded on location?
Thank you!

Aside from the voice over and loop group there was not much principal ADR, maybe 10%, and most of it was done for story points or dialogue overlaps. Almost every scene was improvised so there were a lot of mismatched overlaps.

The office speeches were recorded with the mic Leo was holding, a lav, and a boom, so it was a matter of finding the right balance for those tracks in each shot. There was a PA in the room and the boom got a good recording of it in most shots. I also added a bit of mic effect in the mix.
Old 8th March 2014
  #22
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Yeah, your boss is pretty off from what I've experienced out here.
Old 8th March 2014
  #23
Lives for gear
 

The boss in question also doesn't understand modern acting technique--the actors are trained to give a total performance, to "inhabit" their character, and it is very hard for many actors to get back into the headspace they were in on the set--in costume and makeup, with the other actors, on location, with the props etc when ADRing in a recording studio. For some lines, non dramatic exposition etc it can be fine, but for real "money" lines--climactic scenes important to the emotional tone of the movie, all the directors I've worked with would rather put up with some location sound problems and have that performance than an ADRed one. MANY times we've gone to the trouble to get ADR that I thought was pretty darn good, only to have the director decide that he or she wasn't feeling the performance the way they had with the location sound, even if it was mediocre.

philp
Old 8th March 2014
  #24
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dr.sound's Avatar
 

Now if you're talking Indian Films then 100% is ADR.
I know, I've done quite a few including starting another one today.
It is 100% ADR. They don't even try to use Productioon Sound
there. The one major exception was "Slumdog Millionaire".
Old 8th March 2014
  #25
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.sound View Post
The one major exception was "Slumdog Millionaire".
That's not an indian film. It's just set in India.
Old 8th March 2014
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.sound View Post
Now if you're talking Indian Films then 100% is ADR.
I know, I've done quite a few including starting another one today.
It is 100% ADR. They don't even try to use Productioon Sound
there. The one major exception was "Slumdog Millionaire".
Over on Jeff Wexler's board we have at least one very active member who is a location soundie in India, and his posts lead me to believe that many younger directors want what most Euro-American directors want--to have their location sound work for post, and that he is not alone in doing location sound that lives in the mix. He does emphasize, however, that getting good sound there is uphill work.

philp
Old 9th March 2014
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.sound View Post
The one major exception was "Slumdog Millionaire".
British film, made by British director, set in India! And as far as I know they don't do 100% ADR here in the UK unless its an absolute necessity.
Old 9th March 2014
  #28
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Sorry, you're right but you get my point. Production Sound is not used in Indian Movies that are shot, mixed and played for the Indian audience.
Nearly non existant.
Old 9th March 2014
  #29
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nzl62's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.sound View Post
Sorry, you're right but you get my point. Production Sound is not used in Indian Movies that are shot, mixed and played for the Indian audience.
Nearly non existant.
Yep and most sound hellish.
I had to do adr for a "bollywood" flick. They insisted on recording to a dvd of the cut, I wasn't able to ingest it we did a couple of takes at most - all were completely out of sync but no one cared as all the audience was interested was the songs according to director.
It is extremely challenging to lower your standards that low - I found it an awful experience and would have only been made more tolerable if I was deaf and blind. To be fair this was prob a c grade bolly flik at best. But overall, sync seems to be an optional extra
Old 9th March 2014
  #30
Gear Head
 

Well said

Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickFaith View Post
From a finance costing viewpoint the "most" word is a bit to vague since so much stuff goes on in Hollywood. U need to break the films down by genre, then by distribution approaches. For example in the Animated blockbuster category, most voice is done in post. In the superhero blockbuster I'd lean to most is done in post ( i.e. Especially when major characters are vfx). For high end indie drama (I.e. Woody Allen films), very little done in post. the ratio is also normally modified by the directors work approach. This is all worked out in detail as the film is costed as it relates to distribution (ie since broadcast only work has very tight schedules/budget so way less ADR, things like feature films with major openings with a perfectionist director will have large ADR budgets).
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