The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Epic. LA Film School Class Action Lawsuit Recorders, Players & Tape Machines
Old 31st December 2010
  #1
Gear Nut
 
Eric L's Avatar
 

Epic. LA Film School Class Action Lawsuit

Never understood why someone would spend this much money to try to get an entry level job. Now it seems, they weren't even getting that.


Lawsuit claims L.A. film school overstated jobs - Yahoo! News
Old 31st December 2010
  #2
Ouch. That's just frightening, though you always have to take placement numbers with a grain of salt, especially in this business.
Old 31st December 2010
  #3
Gear Nut
 
ankely's Avatar
 

I taught at one of these schools.

What is stated in that article has merit in my experience.

These schools take in up to the legal limit of 90% of their income from gov't loans to students.

That's the real story of these schools.

Education or more accurately Edutainment is the vehicle thru which they get the gov't money.

Kidz don't matter.
Old 31st December 2010
  #4
Gear Head
 

My experience, from having gone to one of these schools and actually getting a job in the industry is it is a two way street.

You get the information and knowledge you need to break in to the industry but you have to be driven to succeed and that usually means working from the bottom as an assistant, working nights, doing the mundane tasks until you can work your way up.

The majority of the students I was in class with didn't put the hard work in, and seemed to be there because their rich parents wanted them to go to school, and it sounded cool, or they thought they could be some instant director or DJ.

The schools are a money making industry, they max out the tuition and promise jobs in an exciting busy industry that we all know is hard to break into, and not exactly thriving, but had I not gone to school, I wouldn't have gotten a call back on my resume, so it is a necessary evil in most cases.
Old 1st January 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Coast View Post
My experience, from having gone to one of these schools and actually getting a job in the industry is it is a two way street.

You get the information and knowledge you need to break in to the industry but you have to be driven to succeed and that usually means working from the bottom as an assistant, working nights, doing the mundane tasks until you can work your way up.

The majority of the students I was in class with didn't put the hard work in, and seemed to be there because their rich parents wanted them to go to school, and it sounded cool, or they thought they could be some instant director or DJ.

The schools are a money making industry, they max out the tuition and promise jobs in an exciting busy industry that we all know is hard to break into, and not exactly thriving, but had I not gone to school, I wouldn't have gotten a call back on my resume, so it is a necessary evil in most cases.
I'm glad you had the drive and good fortune to succeed in the business, with or without your education at one of the institutions in question. That has nothing to do with the legality of how they operate or the cynicism of how they recruit students by telling them what they want to hear. I've suspected that many of the audio/media schools in my area are scams of one kind or another for years, and now as a taxpayer that subsidizes them I want an accounting. Not all such schools are bad, but the rising chorus of complaints (many of which I've heard first hand) justify scrutiny of their programs and practices. I do not think those schools are a "necessary evil" at all: one can achieve the same results via classes at public colleges, by interning, by working and by studying on one's own. That may be more difficult than attending a for-profit audio school, but the results will be the same with far less debt for the student and less spent in government ed. loans. Another issue for me as a taxpayer: it has been shown that graduates of for-profit schools default on their student loans at a much higher rate than graduates of public schools. I don't think this is because those for-profit grads are more dishonest, I think it is because they are having a hard time finding work with those degrees or certifications, and are living with a crushing debt load. The rules for Federal Ed loans need to be modified to protect the taxpayer from those high loan default rates and the students from exaggerated and unrealistic expectations caused by many of these schools.

phil p
Old 1st January 2011
  #6
Gear Head
 

I tried to break in via other means, but when I spoke to Studio managers, they basically told me, go to school A or B and come back and see us, so for me it was a necessary evil... and I mean evil, as I agree with most of your post.

This was years ago and the tuition was still over 10 grand a year, but it allowed me a foot in the door and I payed my tuition off within 3 years working in the industry.

I was never subsidized by any tax payers (but I am in Canada so maybe it is different where you are), in fact I payed interest on that loan so I was actually subsidizing the government and the for profit school.
Old 1st January 2011
  #7
Lives for gear
 
The MPCist's Avatar
 

Americans love to sue....
Old 1st January 2011
  #8
Lives for gear
 
ggegan's Avatar
Why would anyone expect these schools to operate any differently than the industry they are supposedly training the students to enter?
Old 1st January 2011
  #9
Lives for gear
 
jimmydeluxe's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
Why would anyone expect these schools to operate any differently than the industry they are supposedly training the students to enter?
Well-said.
Old 1st January 2011
  #10
Gear Maniac
 

I am shocked to my very core.

Oh wait, nope.
Old 1st January 2011
  #11
Lives for gear
As a law student I've studied many of these cases that have been brought in my country, UK, Canada and the US, often its Universities that get sued (alarmingly successfully) - My University actually got successfully sued whilst I was doing my paper on it lol
Old 1st January 2011
  #12
Gear Nut
 
ankely's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
Why would anyone expect these schools to operate any differently than the industry they are supposedly training the students to enter?
It's not just the media schools, it's the for-profits in general.
Old 1st January 2011
  #13
I think that today many parents are questioning the cost of college in general. This is especially true of the "Ivy League" type colleges that charge over $50,000 a year or more and prepare the students for a very uncertain future. It use to be if you graduated from a top college your chances of finding a really good job increased but today I am not sure that is still the case.

At the local college students are still looking for jobs two to four years after they leave the college.

NPR recently did a survey of 2000 potential graduates of colleges in 2011. 85% of them said they would probably go home and live with mommy and daddy since their prospects for gainful employment were non existent.

It use to be said that a college graduate would earn over one million more dollars a year than someone who had not graduated from college but again I am not sure that is still a good estimate. My plumber charges me $70.00 per hour but there are recent college graduates working in low pay entry level jobs that are making less than $10.00 per hour. Not a good time for college graduates...

If you are in the arts or the humanities your chance for getting good gain full employment are not good. If you are a science, pre med, engineer or mathematics major you have a much better chance to succeed.

Many students today are going on to graduate school with the hopes of getting a better job when they finally graduate but when they really take a look at what is happening in the world today they just stay in college trying to put off as long as possible their entry into the job market.

I think there is a real tragedy happening today in academic places that promise the world but cannot deliver on their promises. This is especially true of Conservatories and specialized schools who tell students that after they spend $200,000 or more that they will have a chance to get a good job. The student graduates and finds that they are basically unemployable and either can teach privately or go into an allied field.

Not sure where this is all headed but it is not a very encouraging picture for college graduates in general.
Old 1st January 2011
  #14
Lives for gear
 
ggegan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I think that today many parents are questioning the cost of college in general. This is especially true of the "Ivy League" type colleges that charge over $50,000 a year or more and prepare the students for a very uncertain future. It use to be if you graduated from a top college your chances of finding a really good job increased but today I am not sure that is still the
I beg to differ about the Ivies. My son is a junior at Princeton and my daughter will be a freshman at Columbia in the fall. For us, it was cheaper for them to go to the Ivies, particularly Princeton, than any of the California State Universities like Berkeley or Santa Barbara, because the Ivies have huge endowments and are very generous with the money. Many major out-of-state universities, both public and private, are between $45k and $50k a year. None of them guarantee anything in the way of a job, but when a kid is accepted into a university that is as ridiculously selective as many of the Ivies are, just the fact that they got in carries a lot af cache. They may not walk away with a guarantee, but they definitely have a high degree of credibility regarding their intelligence and willingness to apply themselves.
Old 1st January 2011
  #15
Gear Guru
 
charles maynes's Avatar
 

I have to concur with Gary- but will add the following-

If a kid goes to an Ivy league school and finishes near the top of their class, they WILL get a job. And one which is better than minimum wage-

In fact if a kid goes to a community college and graduates with distinction, chances are that they will also get a job.

Getting "C's" though will do you little good. No matter where you go....
Old 1st January 2011
  #16
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I think that today many parents are questioning the cost of college in general. This is especially true of the "Ivy League" type colleges that charge over $50,000 a year or more and prepare the students for a very uncertain future. It use to be if you graduated from a top college your chances of finding a really good job increased but today I am not sure that is still the case.

At the local college students are still looking for jobs two to four years after they leave the college.

NPR recently did a survey of 2000 potential graduates of colleges in 2011. 85% of them said they would probably go home and live with mommy and daddy since their prospects for gainful employment were non existent.

It use to be said that a college graduate would earn over one million more dollars a year than someone who had not graduated from college but again I am not sure that is still a good estimate. My plumber charges me $70.00 per hour but there are recent college graduates working in low pay entry level jobs that are making less than $10.00 per hour. Not a good time for college graduates...

If you are in the arts or the humanities your chance for getting good gain full employment are not good. If you are a science, pre med, engineer or mathematics major you have a much better chance to succeed.

Many students today are going on to graduate school with the hopes of getting a better job when they finally graduate but when they really take a look at what is happening in the world today they just stay in college trying to put off as long as possible their entry into the job market.

I think there is a real tragedy happening today in academic places that promise the world but cannot deliver on their promises. This is especially true of Conservatories and specialized schools who tell students that after they spend $200,000 or more that they will have a chance to get a good job. The student graduates and finds that they are basically unemployable and either can teach privately or go into an allied field.

Not sure where this is all headed but it is not a very encouraging picture for college graduates in general.
Humanities etc grads of universities were never promised anything but that their lives would be more interesting having gotten a general education than they would be without one. This is what I was explicitly told in the late 1960s and early '70s, when it was accepted that college grads earned more. It's true that your plumber may get $70+/hr, but that guy is also responsible for his own insurance, health care, vehicle, tools, advertising etc etc, and had to educate himself--perhaps in community college and perhaps on the job or both. He is certainly not CLEARING $70/hr after those expenses, any more than I am as a sound person with a lot of tools and similar overhead. Having a degree (BA) from a 4 year university still does matter re jobs--my son's first job in the TV biz in LA after graduation specified a 4 year BA as a requirement for the (entry level) gig. The problem is that there aren't so many jobs of any kind open right now. As always, one has to decide what one can really afford, in education as in everything else. My daughter COULD have gone to an Ivy League school, but when the size of the debt load she'd be graduating with was explained to her she decided to go to a state school, so she'd have more freedom (via less debt) to decide about what to do after graduation. My suspicion is that many college students are not clear about those debt obligations....

I think it DOES matter that some of those trade schools are being dishonest with their prospective students, and the idea that since those kids are attempting to enter the supposedly equally dishonest world of media that sort of dishonesty is ok, is ridiculous. If laws and rules are being broken that should stop, and condoning the constriction if not the ruination of a young person's prospects through dishonest means is reprehensible in all cases.

phil p
Old 1st January 2011
  #17
Lives for gear
 
ggegan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by philper View Post

I think it DOES matter that some of those trade schools are being dishonest with their prospective students, and the idea that since those kids are attempting to enter the supposedly equally dishonest world of media that sort of dishonesty is ok, is ridiculous. If laws and rules are being broken that should stop, and condoning the constriction if not the ruination of a young person's prospects through dishonest means is reprehensible in all cases.

phil p
Just to be clear, I'm not saying it's okay to be dishonest, I'm saying that in the entertainment industry, people should be skeptical of any claim, promise or guarantee unless it comes in the form of a carefully constructed contract, and then only if you can afford a good lawyer.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #18
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
Just to be clear, I'm not saying it's okay to be dishonest, I'm saying that in the entertainment industry, people should be skeptical of any claim, promise or guarantee unless it comes in the form of a carefully constructed contract, and then only if you can afford a good lawyer.
Especially if it entails implied promises of a "shortcut" to a career.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #19
Lives for gear
 
soundboy's Avatar
I still think of our profession as being apprenticeship based. These audio schools never really made sense to me. Frontline did a great story on the for profit and online universities, and it seems they really are built for the purpose of getting student loans. These students are really left high and dry.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #20
I think you can't ever blame a school or university for not getting a job (in our industry or other). Lots of motivation and the will to learn will open doors. If you really want to start doing sound work or be a lawyer or be a plumber, you'll get there sooner or later, if you're prepared to put in a lot of work, research and education (without pay of course in the beginning, while your are learning or even more correct with paying in case of following a course).
This said, it is my experience that in any sector there are not too many really enthusiastic people who want to put in the efforts mentioned above.
When building studios I've worked with bad carpenters (as much as I try to avoid bad craftsmen at all times). When working as an assistant in the film school where I studied myself, one of the things I did was teach equipment (ProTools 1 and Akai DD1000 amongst other things at the time). 2nd year had about 50 students at the time (this was supposed to be a mixed sound-picture-lighting interested group). When I would ask who was interested in sound, about 25 would come. Then I would start to explain the DD1000 for this group. After about 2 hours some students would ask for a break. About 15 would come back after the break. And after 4 hours I would know which 5 students would have a real interest in sound postproduction. Of these 5, maybe 1 or 2 would be really talented and find a job in sound post later.
As a studio owner an employer, I perfected my sense for (non)talent through the years. First selection is easy, reading the mail you get from somebody asking for work or apprenticeship. Often you don't even have to read till the bottom of the mail. If otoh it looks promising, I'll invite them for an interview, which takes place during lunch, where they can eat with me and my colleagues. I'll ask technical questions and what their motivation is and it quickly becomes clear when you're talking to the right person. Fastest interview was about 7 minutes, when I told the guy he was not what I was looking for (I let him finish eating his sandwich though :-) and offered some advice).
Being critical and questioning oneself during education is also very important. Choice of university is one of those important things one shouldn't take too lightly. If the schools mentioned in the subject of this thread really are bad quality than that should be clear quite quickly, doing some investigation on the internet and asking graduates from the school. The internet made such things a lot easier than 20 years ago...

Happy New Year!

Thierry
Old 3rd January 2011
  #21
Gear Maniac
 

I think like any product, if the claims are grossly overstated and note true, there is some form of responsibility on the seller that should be accounted for. In a way it is a contract. They say 99% of people get jobs in this type of studio, then after some research you find that nobody is getting work, I do think you have a right to sue. Buyer beware is all nice and all but what if you you bought some food that stated there are no shellfish in this product and then you almost die from the shellfish. You had no way of knowing and if they clearly lied knowing they were distorting the facts basically committing fraud.

I think you would need a few people tho to really get something out of suing a school.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #22
Gear Maniac
 

I have to agree with ThierryD. I think it is clear that there are not enough jobs for the thousands of students being churned out by hundreds of schools worldwide. Having done my studies in one of those schools I value everything I learned there and know that if I had to learn that on my own it would have taken a lot longer to get to the same level of proficiency. In few words, the school provided the knowledge. They provided the toolbox full of tools for me to take away. However, our industry is one that is extremely competitive and hard to break into and as in most career paths tools are not enough. You need to know not only what the tools are and what they do and how they are used but you must be able to then take them and create something you and your clients can be proud of. I call this experience as it is clear that the more you do the better results you get. When I studied I began taking on projects from around the country to work on and used the lessons at school to keep adding tools to my toolbox as I worked and to ask the questions I was getting while working on these films and projects. By spending so much time working on projects I found that when going to the lessons I understood them better or at least asked the right questions.

Many of the directors I worked with while at college have now moved on to do bigger and better things and I am still working with them essentially having built a starting client base while at college. This came through hard work and long hours in the studios editing, recording,mixing and figuring things out as well as working every extra hour in bars and restaurants to pay for it all (was able to do so without taking any loans and no help from family). They were an intense 2-3 years and I wouldn't say the school got me a job (though I have started part time teaching there now so actually they did :p) but I can say that without the school it would have taken me a lot longer to get working in what I love. Having access to great facilities meant I could win pitches and get projects as a student which was the beginning of building a now growing clientbase.

Anyone with a passion for sound can end up working in the industry but it requires extreme passion, dedication and hard work...These three things no college can give you but when used correctly a college can give you a great start off!
Old 3rd January 2011
  #23
Gear Addict
 
Lipflap's Avatar
 

I teach at three film/sound schools: two in the Middle East and one in Latin America. While I don't think that graduates from these schools are yet qualified to function as editors or mixers or location mixers on serious films, they leave school with a decent overview of sound, film, electronics and acoustics. They've at least tasted many aspects of film sound production and I feel that the motivated graduates are reasonably well equipped to set out for interviews, apprenticeships or small-scale films. The rest is up to them.
Perhaps most importantly, my graduates leave school with a fair idea of what they like, what inspires them, and what they have no interest in doing. This sobering experience is worth a great deal.
I regularly tell my students that school is but the beginning of their vocational education, that everything worthwhile they will learn on the job. I also them that a strict boss who takes an interest in their advancement is worth his/her weight in gold. Still, I'm certain that something they learn in school with be useful, and if we, the teachers, spread our enthusiasm and love of cinema and storytelling through sound, the students will get their money's worth.
Old 4th January 2011
  #24
Lives for gear
 

It's not just the audio schools that are gouging the student loan market while promoting false expectations for work.

From nursing to accounting to computer and tech schools this whole new private school market is charging a bundle while not delivering the goods. One of the things they don't teach or promote is the real world market for employment, salary and benefits. Nor are they teaching real world budgeting and workflows.
Old 4th January 2011
  #25
please don't get me started...


Audio and Video schools (in general) that can stay accredited so that they can get Government loans are simply a license to print money. Even though there might be a few teachers out there actually trying to teach these kids... The school owners are in it for only one thing... and it ain't 'cause there is an abundance of open positions in the entertainment industry...




cheers
geo
Old 4th January 2011
  #26
Gear Head
 

i used to walk pass that school everyday and always wonder how good it was.. i met a few people that went there and some said its a great place but dont offer you anything. Very similar situation with the school i went to. I went to SAE right down the road from LA film school and there "job placement" program is a joke, and im sure even today its a joke. I would go on the placement website to see if there was any job openings and everything was so outdated, they never updated the site with newer postings and not to mention the student director had no ties to the industry. It's really disappointing because they schools cost an extreme amount of money and people that work extremely hard like myself to graduate get nothing in the end. Now for me, i dont have a college degree and only have my audio engineering degree from here but that's not gonna help me get a job. now i am back in college and working towards a degree but by the time i grad with a bach i would be like 32, so i will have n enormous amount of debt not a lot of experience in the industry since my time now has to go to school and pay for rent and all. So people that are in my boat it's an ultimate fail. A lot of these schools have students work there that just graduated from the school, which can cause problems in the learning environment because people that go to these schools want to be taught the correct way and dont want to be mislead with anything. All in all is that I put my time in when i went to SAE, i enjoyed the program a lot. There were a lot of stuff going on when i was there which cause a lot of frustration with my class and our experience there. I would have to rethink about whether going to another vocational school again. The one thing I like about those schools is that your learning what you want to learn and what you pay for unlike college which take your money and make you take classes you have zero interest in, or the place you in non credit classes and take your money that way. School is a scam but we have to play the game in order to get that $10 an hour career job we always wanted
Old 4th January 2011
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
I beg to differ about the Ivies. My son is a junior at Princeton and my daughter will be a freshman at Columbia in the fall. For us, it was cheaper for them to go to the Ivies, particularly Princeton, than any of the California State Universities like Berkeley or Santa Barbara, because the Ivies have huge endowments and are very generous with the money. Many major out-of-state universities, both public and private, are between $45k and $50k a year. None of them guarantee anything in the way of a job, but when a kid is accepted into a university that is as ridiculously selective as many of the Ivies are, just the fact that they got in carries a lot af cache. They may not walk away with a guarantee, but they definitely have a high degree of credibility regarding their intelligence and willingness to apply themselves.
I am glad your kids are able to go to top colleges. I hope they are able to get jobs when they graduate. As you said the colleges don't guarantee anything anymore. The NPR survey I spoke about took in colleges from every level from Ivy League to community colleges.

I see more and more postings for entry level jobs in commerce and industry asking for a master's degree. I guess that this where the whole education thing is headed since today most people have to have a college degree just to get hired into a business. To be more selective these companies are now asking for a Master's degree.

At the college here in town they are NOT hiring very many tenure track professors. They are hiring a lot of 2 to 3 year contract faculty who are not on a tenure track and will be replaced at the end of the contract. I guess this saves the college money and gives departments a fresh person every two to three years with some specialized skills.

One thing I have noticed recently is that colleges are run more like businesses and less like academic institutions. They talk about their "yield" and their ratio of incoming to graduating students much like a company would talk about a new product introduction. They also seem to be in a race to see who can charge the most and therefore be the "best". Parents are lead to believe (but not guaranteed) that if their children go to a specific college they will some how have a better education and therefore a better chance to get a "real" job upon graduation.

I think a lot depends on the student's will to succeed and how much they are willing to put into their education. Today grades seem to mean everything but as most of us know good grades are not directly applicable to how good someone can mix.

I would much rather hire a young person who has a C+ B- grade average who did some extra curricular audio work when he or she was in college and who are eager and willing to take on anything life throws at them then someone who is a strait "A" student but is so rapped up in academics that they cannot communicate with clients or be willing to spend hours getting just the "right sound" for some foot steps in Foley because they think it is beneath them.

I hear what you are saying but I don't thing that just by having a degree from an Ivy League school will do much for someone's employment skills unless that person is ALSO driven to succeed.

FWIW and YMMV
Old 4th January 2011
  #28
There are simply too many schools turning out too many students for the amount of jobs available today.

More and more work is being done in boutique studios or literally in someone's basement or garage. The days of the big studios who hire lots of people (read students) are no longer. This also means that students who are looking for internships are going to be very disappointed because there are less and less places that take interns. The whole "apprenticeship" idea, which made this industry so strong, is also no longer since most of these smaller studios that are doing the work are one person operations and they cannot afford to have someone else on the payroll.

I personally know three FS school graduates. One of them is working at GC, one is living at home with his parents and working at McDonald's, and one, who graduated top in his class at FS, is selling Cell Phones for Verizon. None of them are sitting behind a big SSL consoles and will probably never sit behind one. Their parents paid a lot for their education and got very little in return.

I also know some recent graduates from my alma mater who are also having problems even finding a job in audio and are working in allied fields or have given up their dream of working in audio and are now pharmaceutical salesmen or working as a teller in a bank.

Too many schools turning out too many graduates = a prescription for disaster and a lot of hopes and dreams going down in flames.

Not a pretty picture.
Old 4th January 2011
  #29
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
There are simply too many schools turning out too many students for the amount of jobs available today.

More and more work is being done in boutique studios or literally in someone's basement or garage. The days of the big studios who hire lots of people (read students) are no longer. This also means that students who are looking for internships are going to be very disappointed because there are less and less places that take interns. The whole "apprenticeship" idea, which made this industry so strong, is also no longer since most of these smaller studios that are doing the work are one person operations and they cannot afford to have someone else on the payroll.

I personally know three FS school graduates. One of them is working at GC, one is living at home with his parents and working at McDonald's, and one, who graduated top in his class at FS, is selling Cell Phones for Verizon. None of them are sitting behind a big SSL consoles and will probably never sit behind one. Their parents paid a lot for their education and got very little in return.

I also know some recent graduates from my alma mater who are also having problems even finding a job in audio and are working in allied fields or have given up their dream of working in audio and are now pharmaceutical salesmen or working as a teller in a bank.

Too many schools turning out too many graduates = a prescription for disaster and a lot of hopes and dreams going down in flames.

Not a pretty picture.




agree 100%. no one wants to give anyone an opportunity anymore. no one wants to even pay people anymore especially the sound people. I been trying to think of a backup plan that I would like to do and I simply don't have one. I only want to work in the post field. Even if i wanted to freelance I don't even know where to find work, I've looked at some of the entertainment websites and there's hardly any job postings for sound people, and if there is its usually for low or no money. AWESOME. great way to make a living.
Old 5th January 2011
  #30
Gear Nut
 
Mister_T's Avatar
 

Epic. LA Film School Class Action Lawsuit

I worked with two guys who had degrees from Full Sail and some "recording conservatory." They scoffed at me when I told them I didn't go to any such school. Also I didn't have any certificates from Digidesign saying I could use Pro Tools.

That was my first gig in post production. Those guys are still there working for peanuts. I'm not. Bump one for the school of hard knocks!
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
custom24 / Work In Progress / Advice Requested / Show and Tell / Artist Showcase / Mix-Offs
0
digital 1010 / Electronic Music Instruments and Electronic Music Production
1
vodka gimli / So much gear, so little time
0
BevvyB / Gear free zone - shoot the breeze
5

Forum Jump
Forum Jump