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Epic. LA Film School Class Action Lawsuit Recorders, Players & Tape Machines
Old 5th January 2011
  #31
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charles maynes's Avatar
 

I know a few guys who came out of Full Sail who have done quite well in post here in Hollywood-
Old 5th January 2011
  #32
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ansonwing's Avatar
 

I was actually planning on going to The L.A. Recording School. Obviously I am rethinking at this point. I understand the industry is not at an all time high but quite honestly, I couldn't imagine myself doing anything different. If you don't suggest these recording schools then what do you suggest? It seems that people only want to talk down how bad these schools are yet there are no alternatives being made. I've heard the usual so many times - read online, buy gear, learn by experience, internship, etc. That's fine and quite honestly that's what I've done up to this point with the exception of a few classes at a local college. I know that those examples can be good sources but bad as well. reading online can be very time consuming, I am buying gear but limited with that, and as everyone states, there are no internships going on. It's not that I'm not willing to put in the time or hard work- quite the opposite. But I personally thrive in a school setting where I'm getting information from someone who I know knows what they're doing. If these schools are not the best way to learn or get into the industry, what is? It doesn't matter to me that these schools don't get you the dream job right out of school, that's not what I'm expecting. I know that hard work and determination will get me where I want to go. I just want to do it to be in a school setting, learning and soaking in what matters most to me. Any advice?
Old 5th January 2011
  #33
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ggegan's Avatar
I know some instructors at a couple of the schools mentioned who are seasoned professionals. I can't vouch for their teaching ability, but they definitely know their subjects.

Like Charles, I also have met a number of graduates from Full Sail who have done reasonably well.

I think that all you can expect from any trade school is a basic knowledge of how to use the tools and a general understanding of the process. That isn't enough to make you a competent editor or mixer when you finish the curriculum, probably not even an assistant editor or recordist, but it makes you a good candidate for an internship or maybe an apprenticeship. However, even unpaid internships are in short supply, so the competition is pretty fierce and there are a lot of intangibles that affect who gets picked that may have very little to do with technical knowledge.
Old 5th January 2011
  #34
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Mister_T's Avatar
 

Epic. LA Film School Class Action Lawsuit

Seems like it kinda boils down to the person, not the school. I don't have anything against folks who go or went to these schools.

Guess what bugs me is the marketing. Just like the marketing for home recording gear ("mix your band's record from your macbook"), the article in the OP's link was about misrepresenting claims from the schools about success... Which would make sense. I don't think it's worth suing over - kids filing the lawsuit shoulda worked harder in school is all.
Old 5th January 2011
  #35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansonwing View Post
I was actually planning on going to The L.A. Recording School. Obviously I am rethinking at this point. I understand the industry is not at an all time high but quite honestly, I couldn't imagine myself doing anything different. If you don't suggest these recording schools then what do you suggest? It seems that people only want to talk down how bad these schools are yet there are no alternatives being made. I've heard the usual so many times - read online, buy gear, learn by experience, internship, etc. That's fine and quite honestly that's what I've done up to this point with the exception of a few classes at a local college. I know that those examples can be good sources but bad as well. reading online can be very time consuming, I am buying gear but limited with that, and as everyone states, there are no internships going on. It's not that I'm not willing to put in the time or hard work- quite the opposite. But I personally thrive in a school setting where I'm getting information from someone who I know knows what they're doing. If these schools are not the best way to learn or get into the industry, what is? It doesn't matter to me that these schools don't get you the dream job right out of school, that's not what I'm expecting. I know that hard work and determination will get me where I want to go. I just want to do it to be in a school setting, learning and soaking in what matters most to me. Any advice?
Just going to one of these trade "school" is not going to get you much other than a basic understanding of the equipment and the techniques used in Post. If you are already working in or interning in Post I guess at this point and with the current economic conditions I would say just stay where you are.

If you attend the trade school you are STILL going to have to go into some type of internship or apprenticeship program which will take you back to where you are now.

When I attended college back in the 60's it was different. I went to college to become an EE. After six weeks of re learning Ohm's law (I had already had three years of electronics and physics in High School) I said enough and switched to Broadcasting where I really felt at home.

I really wanted to be an audio engineer. At the time there were no colleges in the states that you could "major" in audio. So Broadcasting was as close as I could get. I got a really good broad based education in the arts, the humanities and in broadcasting. The University taught me how to study and how to find information. My education was GREAT and I really excelled. I was ready to take on the world after graduation but Uncle Sam said he needed me for the Vietnam war and I got drafted. I spent two years in the Army as a Broadcast Specialist and then got out and got a job at the local PBS television station. From there to being a director of audio services for a college for 26 years and then on to my current situation of having my own business in mastering and post production.

Looking back I would NEVER have imagined where I would be today when I left college. I thought I would be working in Radio-TV or a recording studio and making some good bucks. Today most Radio and TV stations do not even have a separate "audio engineer" and there are less and less recording studios that would have hired me as an "audio engineer" so my career path was not what I expected. I love what I am doing now and everyday is exciting and different and I cannot wait to get to work - which is a short trip since my studio is part of my house.

I wish you the best of luck and hope all your dreams come true - but be prepared for some bumps along the way and don't be too surprised if you are doing something entirely different 20 to 40 years in the future.
Old 5th January 2011
  #36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_T View Post
Seems like it kinda boils down to the person, not the school.
I think you nailed it on the head. The school has nothing to do with it, its ALL about the person.

I went to Five Towns College in New York. Unlike some of these schools you actually leave there with a degree, not just a certificate. The audio program offered audio as a MINOR and you could major in music or business. I choose music and got a bachelors. Anyway after several years in different non-audio industries things are finally starting to happen for me in this industry, but only after I stopped feeling sorry for myself and started to take real responsibility for where i wanted to end up. Poor attitude is the biggest block people face i believe. When my attitude changed it began to work.

PLUS networking, meeting people in the industry face to face and building your reputation is soooo important,and this is what they DONT teach you in school. Emailing resumes to faceless studios and chasing no-pay craigslist ads won't do anything. Nobody cares about your certificate or degree either. You can learn most of the stuff they are going to teach you from books. (True of any subject!)

There are opportunities out there, kids are just misguided about how the opportunities show come to them.

In hindsight, could i have saved a lot of money if i bought equipment, interned and worked my way up? Maybe, but i feel blessed that everything happened as it did. I learned much more about life and business working in other industries that i consider priceless and wouldnt have learned if i dove headfirst into the industry interning at 18.
Old 5th January 2011
  #37
Gear Nut
 

The issue here is whether a trade school inflated its graduate employment numbers to maintain accredation with the state. Lying that people working at Best Buy are part of the "entertainment industry" is just a weak way to inflate the numbers in the face of a competitive workplace. If wouldn't be surprised one bit if these claims are true. If they are true, then the students should feel the school mis-represented the product they were selling.

If an institution boasts a 90% placement rate (or similar), then it seems like a reasonable investment to get yourself started. If they have a 10% placement rate, you'd naturally wonder if it's worthwhile.

Personally, I'd say you could buy a hell of a lot of studio gear for 25 G's. If it doesn't work out for you and you decide to quit, you can always sell it for 15 G's on Gearslutz
Old 6th January 2011
  #38
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To be honest with you, for the $20 or $30,000 you would pay to go to one of these schools, you could probably hire an out of work professional or pay a studio with cash flow problems to teach you the technical ropes.

There are also schools like SCAD > Programs > Sound Design > Faculty
where you can learn from a real pro like David Stone.

I'd just be sure that any school teaches you about business, accounting, money management, electronics, acoustics, integration with video and graphics, real world digital workflow and not just a ProTools certification. That will get you about as far as a barista degree from Starbucks. Most students will end up being self-employed at some point, so knowing how to manage a business is extremely important.
Old 7th January 2011
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Sanchez View Post
To be honest with you, for the $20 or $30,000 you would pay to go to one of these schools, you could probably hire an out of work professional or pay a studio with cash flow problems to teach you the technical ropes.
But then you don't get a student loan and that is how people afford these types of schools that don't really give out scholarships.
Old 7th January 2011
  #40
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monsieur x's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwignjhxc View Post
i used to walk pass that school everyday and always wonder how good it was.. i met a few people that went there and some said its a great place but dont offer you anything. Very similar situation with the school i went to. I went to SAE right down the road from LA film school and there "job placement" program is a joke, and im sure even today its a joke. I would go on the placement website to see if there was any job openings and everything was so outdated, they never updated the site with newer postings and not to mention the student director had no ties to the industry. It's really disappointing because they schools cost an extreme amount of money and people that work extremely hard like myself to graduate get nothing in the end. Now for me, i dont have a college degree and only have my audio engineering degree from here but that's not gonna help me get a job. now i am back in college and working towards a degree but by the time i grad with a bach i would be like 32, so i will have n enormous amount of debt not a lot of experience in the industry since my time now has to go to school and pay for rent and all. So people that are in my boat it's an ultimate fail. A lot of these schools have students work there that just graduated from the school, which can cause problems in the learning environment because people that go to these schools want to be taught the correct way and dont want to be mislead with anything. All in all is that I put my time in when i went to SAE, i enjoyed the program a lot. There were a lot of stuff going on when i was there which cause a lot of frustration with my class and our experience there. I would have to rethink about whether going to another vocational school again. The one thing I like about those schools is that your learning what you want to learn and what you pay for unlike college which take your money and make you take classes you have zero interest in, or the place you in non credit classes and take your money that way. School is a scam but we have to play the game in order to get that $10 an hour career job we always wanted
The mistake is ever thinking that SAE is an alternative or a substitute for a college education. It's not. Why do people even put the two in the same schema mentally?

Getting an actual degree is about becoming a well rounded individual so that one can better contribute to society. It's to be cultured, to better enjoy our world.

"Tech schools" only make more "skilled labourers" for the machine.

Going to a university and completing a well rounded curriculum that includes art, humanities, science, mathematics, etc. is what will give you the foundation of knowledge you need (and keep you from being a tool).

I would much rather hire someone who graduated with a degree in Music, Liberal Arts or Psychology to work for me as an assistant than someone who has a "Sound Tech. Certifictate" or "Protools Certification".

The good news is you are still very young (30 is a perfect time to take a grab of your life), and you are making the right decision in going to a university.

Your time at SAE is sunk cost, and I hope you can salvage something useful from that time spent.

But others, beware, would going to university full-time and interning at a studio part-time/full-time during the summers not be a much better way to get into a career of music production? I believe it would be. . .

Oh, and most importantly. Sound engineers tend to have one thing in common: they forget about the music. Jeez, please at least play one instrument well and know basic theory, chords and intervals by ear!

All the best,
Old 7th January 2011
  #41
Lives for gear
I mentioned this before (in the intern moan zone thread) but I think it bears repeating. I have a friend who was an instructor at the LA Recording School and he literally knew almost nothing about audio. He had done some 2nd assisting and that was all prior to "teaching" - they gave him a syllabus and he would follow it... he was literally one day ahead of the students

Also, I helped a recording major at another Hollywood Institute (hint-hint) finish his FINAL project in their very poorly maintained studios... I brought my own cables and stands and mics as we couldn't find enough working ones. During the setup he pointed to a tube mic PSU and asked the lab/studio manager if that was a preamp... the manager said "No, that's a compressor"... this was, as I said, his FINAL graduation project.... yikes.
Old 7th January 2011
  #42
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Here's a rough guide for people thinking of going to any "trade" type audio school, whatever they call themselves and whatever they promise you:

1: are you obsessed enough with audio ALREADY, like pre- the school, that you have bought some audio gear and started recording, editing, mixing with it?
2: have you been hanging out at the sound board at clubs or around TV stations or other obvious media-making places trying to see what you can learn?
3: have you cold-called anyone in the industry from the many directories out there to get advice, technical or career? To offer your services and try to sell yourself as an unpaid helper?
4: have you got a soldering iron and some tools, and have you used them to make any audio gear from kits, or repair cables etc?
5: do you have some friends who are equally audio-obsessed as you--have you looked for like-minded people your own age?
6: have you done some projects with other young people (like bands) who want recording done, however you can cobble it together?
7: if you go to church, have you volunteered to do whatever to help the people running the PA for services and events? Ditto at school?
8: do you go to audio trade shows, like AES (that have free admission to the exhibits), and then ask a lot of questions there?
9: do you know and spend time on audio-related forums like this, do searches and ask questions there?
10: if your goal is working in post, have you ever made a film yourself, however humble? Helped someone else make one? Tried to do sound cutting for picture in any of the low-cost tools around now (iMovie or whatever)? Helped with production sound?

If this describes your life (like for YEARS, not for weeks), then the investment in a GOOD trade school for audio might be worth the years of work you'll need to do to pay off the loans the school will require. (Do your research on both the school AND how student loans work.) If you HAVEN'T gotten into the stuff above, then you are NOT ready for a trade school. You are too inexperienced in audio, too lacking in basic skills, too ignorant of the business in general and may be expecting that you can accomplish your goal of working in the industry w/o much effort, just by attending a school and collecting some kind of certificate. THAT is a hallucination you should rid yourself of right away....

phil p
Old 7th January 2011
  #43
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Phil,

That list sounds like the background of an awful lot of very successful Hollywood sound people I know who never went to a trade school.

I think you can get pretty much everything you need other than the actual practical experience of an apprenticeship by reading books and manuals, listening to and analyzing movies, reading interviews in trade mags and on the internet, and playing around with Pro Tools LE, which is pretty cheap.

Then all it takes is a lot of hustle and perseverence to find an internship/apprenticeship and a mentor.
Old 8th January 2011
  #44
Gear Maniac
When I got interested in recording studios, I had a different career and the $175 dollars I paid Shannon Walton (an engineer in the DC area) to "let me be an intern" changed my life. I already had a four year degree, but the guy said repeatedly, "Take as many business management courses as you can stomach." I listened. No matter where you get educated, these days the term "glorified trade school" sums up pretty much everything. Unless you're in a management program, few other opportunities will expose you to the real cost of doing business without taking your time and funds.

Four to eight classes, with or without a degree, well worth it.
Old 8th January 2011
  #45
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charles maynes's Avatar
 

Gary's comments are dead on- I also think business school is a really good idea for anyone in the creative arts-
Old 11th January 2011
  #46
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I went to one of them.

I agree with a lot of you.

I tried interning at some Recording Studios in SF CA. and no one would take me serious without a completion of one school. I was 17 at the time, and have been A HUGE synth head since i was 13. (Moog was my first synth thumbsup lucky me)
But i wanted to do recording/mixing/post for the rest of my life.

I was not a rookie at it but was not at the top of my game. The school I attended had incredible teachers, BUT the thing that helped me LEARN A LOT was the hands on experience... I would like to think 80% of the money I paid for was to be in the recording studios around the gear. Our school DID have issues with the studios every now and then but was taking care of in a timely matter.

At first I attended the A** INST***** of S** Fra******, they told me all i wanted to hear and i certainly believed them... Little did i know i was gonna share a SSL 9000 console with over 300 kids.... i left after a semester... you definitely NEED to do your research.

But knowledge alone does not get you the job. HUNGER and the HUSTLE and KNOWLEDGE is what lands you big jobs.

Overall i was satisfied with my school... glad to say i got an internship at one of the studios now... plus just finished interning at a Record Label here in SF.
Old 11th January 2011
  #47
Here for the gear
 

I went to LA Recording School and graduated last year. A lot of the kids there were social rejects and took out loans to make beatz on their shiny Macbook Pros everyday hoping to be the next Dr. Dre or whatever, I was the rare one that was interested in post, and that's out of a 40 people class.

The school takes in about 25-40 kids every month and the same amount graduates every month, the bottom line is money, once I was out of the door and completed a couple Digi certificates, they just flat out shun me when I ask them for job assistance. None of the internship or job applications that I sent thru them EVER got a reply (and they require you to send the app through them for what they call a "pre-screening" process), non of my follow up with the career center got any attention, and even scheduling a half hour counseling session will have to be booked WEEKS in advance with no guarantee for an alumni. In other words, they took my money, and they're booting my ass outta there so they could focus on recruiting new blood.

Faculty wasn't very impressive either, some of them would just point out a class leader and leave in the middle of class to talk on their phones or back home smoke a J. Some of the teachers have decent credits, but those are cocky or too busy to learn from, and the rest of them are either graduates from LARS or out of work.

In the end, 22k bought me a minimum requirement for the studios to grant me an internship. 2 free works and half a year later I'm starting to earn some money from film post, not much but it's a start. I realized half way through school that 95% of my peers are NOT gonna be my competitors cuz they got no drive, but that also means my real competitors are gonna be at the very least as skilled and eager as me, and that notion still motivates me today.

I just think to myself, if one day I make it big and LARS ask me to be on their newsletter cover as an honorable grad so they could market and parade it, my answer will be a resounding UP YOURS! fuuck
Old 11th January 2011
  #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaotic View Post
I went to LA Recording School and graduated last year. A lot of the kids there were social rejects and took out loans to make beatz on their shiny Macbook Pros everyday hoping to be the next Dr. Dre or whatever, I was the rare one that was interested in post, and that's out of a 40 people class.
Yea man it seems like they mainly focus on the kids that want to make beats for a living and lure them with the "production kit" consisting of a Macbook or something like that. But at the end it all depends on the person a lot of people just expect for S*** to fall on their lap all because they have a diploma or Certificate... Congrats on your paid work though
Old 11th January 2011
  #49
Gear Head
 

yea man the same with me at SAE right down the street.. they have a horrible job placement program. I knew from the start that it wouldn't be helpful but i was hoping to be wrong. Now im home in New York, but might be back in LA in the summer. Its really networking, being persistant and keep pushing i guess. I started going back to college in the fall so my main priority is that now. hopefully i can do some stuff in audio till i graduate. Not too sure how much i want to do this for a career anymore.. film post i would like to but i wont record music for a career anymore.



Quote:
Originally Posted by kaotic View Post
I went to LA Recording School and graduated last year. A lot of the kids there were social rejects and took out loans to make beatz on their shiny Macbook Pros everyday hoping to be the next Dr. Dre or whatever, I was the rare one that was interested in post, and that's out of a 40 people class.

The school takes in about 25-40 kids every month and the same amount graduates every month, the bottom line is money, once I was out of the door and completed a couple Digi certificates, they just flat out shun me when I ask them for job assistance. None of the internship or job applications that I sent thru them EVER got a reply (and they require you to send the app through them for what they call a "pre-screening" process), non of my follow up with the career center got any attention, and even scheduling a half hour counseling session will have to be booked WEEKS in advance with no guarantee for an alumni. In other words, they took my money, and they're booting my ass outta there so they could focus on recruiting new blood.

Faculty wasn't very impressive either, some of them would just point out a class leader and leave in the middle of class to talk on their phones or back home smoke a J. Some of the teachers have decent credits, but those are cocky or too busy to learn from, and the rest of them are either graduates from LARS or out of work.

In the end, 22k bought me a minimum requirement for the studios to grant me an internship. 2 free works and half a year later I'm starting to earn some money from film post, not much but it's a start. I realized half way through school that 95% of my peers are NOT gonna be my competitors cuz they got no drive, but that also means my real competitors are gonna be at the very least as skilled and eager as me, and that notion still motivates me today.

I just think to myself, if one day I make it big and LARS ask me to be on their newsletter cover as an honorable grad so they could market and parade it, my answer will be a resounding UP YOURS! fuuck
Old 11th January 2011
  #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwignjhxc View Post
yea man the same with me at SAE right down the street.. they have a horrible job placement program. I knew from the start that it wouldn't be helpful but i was hoping to be wrong. Now im home in New York, but might be back in LA in the summer. Its really networking, being persistant and keep pushing i guess. I started going back to college in the fall so my main priority is that now. hopefully i can do some stuff in audio till i graduate. Not too sure how much i want to do this for a career anymore.. film post i would like to but i wont record music for a career anymore.
Yea im at SF campus... fairly new. Im not expecting to get a high paying job out the gate but like any job, gotta work your way up the ranks. There is a lot of schools that just have one studio where they teach 20-40 kid classes. I got lucky my class was 8 so no one had to compete to book studio time. We have about 5 studios at the school. Pretty modern set ups no Tape Machines though.
Good luck though man!

Last edited by Smurf_Rocks; 11th January 2011 at 09:15 PM.. Reason: More Info
Old 12th January 2011
  #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Sanchez View Post
Most students will end up being self-employed at some point, so knowing how to manage a business is extremely important.
Yes, this, the course I studied has let me learn the theory and basics of Music & Sound Recording, but precious little in business! My university secured me a one year placement during my studies too, which is great as it's because of my placement that I am employed now.

Any good resources online or anything where I can pick up some management and business skills? I'm kind of playing everything by ear, but knowledge is power. Anything that helps me cut down time with paperwork and so forth will mean I have more time to get my hands on the actual work!
Old 14th January 2011
  #52
Gear Maniac
 

After attending SCAD's Sound Design program, I agree with a lot of what I'm hearing. I've been working in the production and post industry ever since.

You pay out the nose (or rather, for most, your parents do) and your success is largely disconnected from your degree. The degree can help with some employers, as some have mentioned being turned down on the basis of not having one.

The thing is -- the programs guarantee you access to equipment and some level of training. What you get out of it depends on what you put into it and for many programs their motivation ends with getting you in the door. That's the Edutainment part. But I think it is your choice if you get an Edutainment or Education.

Your degree won't mean much -- but your reel will. If your reel kicks ass, you've got a shot at getting a job. It doesn't mean there are jobs in the industry to support the student output. But that's what's been getting people jobs for a long time -- a good reel or a good referral.

You could possibly buy your own equipment and train yourself for a similar price, but many colleges have film programs and other areas that you can work with other people on their projects. Far fewer people want you to cut your teeth on their work outside of college (though many would like pro level work for free....... ugh.)

It's a mixed bag. I know there were plenty of kids in my program who are probably not working in anything audio related right now. It's a gamble, but one you have some amount of control over.
Old 15th January 2011
  #53
Gear Maniac
 

ok, my own story, I had a choice at the age of 17 1/2- a world respected research oriented university/conservatory in my hometown of B-more, or a local state funded regional power of a State U about fifteen minutes north of there, but a budget, provided I got grades and worked part time (no dorms, too close to home). I'd like to keep second guessing myself, but the state school, although too big for my personality, was perfect- many opportunities in film/T.V. live theatre, musicals, music department, computer science etc., Since I went for their generic "entertainment arts" curriculum-kinda like liberal arts but all performance oriented, it was perfect. My major ended up being music, a second major in applied physics/design (I liked optical circuits for some reason), and minors in business and theatre production..four internships mandatory, and my career took me to NASA Goddard, through the last internship I had. Stayed there eighteen years, and got a chance for the big R and never looked back. What did I do there- I.T. and networking.. absolutely nothing to do with my major at all. I saw the same thing many of you pointed out- not much effort from the students, a few decent ones working hard, some that were going to, and definitely made it in the industry..But what the U. stated to their music students? minor in education or business, because until you establish yourself, you're going to need a job.I know in I.T., our certs have to be taken, they do matter, but no-one, I mean no-one gets a job until thier internship is done, period. But going to a tech school is frowned upon, better from a community college. As for pay to learn in a studio, I think I'll try that- at least I'll shake off the rust the last few years of downtime have caused, and get to meet some people.
Old 15th January 2011
  #54
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Someone mentioned the magic word "apprenticeship", and I want to expound a little on the concept and my observations.

Firstly, I am very proud to admit that I am a product of good mentoring through the apprenticeship model. Throughout my life there have been individuals who chose to let me in on what they do and how they do it. I have always been very humble for this, since your mentors pick you and not so much the other way around. When I was first coming up there was a variety of entry level jobs. Driver, client service, assistant tech, that sort of thing. There were lots of people around because it took lots of people to make a movie or television show or whatever. (And it was expensive.) And if you were lucky and showed some kind of promise, then somebody would pull you up and show you whats what.

The problem today, as I see it, is that these jobs have vanished. Its all handled by one person, and he or she just doesn't have the time to show you how to do anything. Heck, you aren't even in the building. We have become super efficient one-person-operations. It's happened everywhere, not just in audio, or post-production. But it hurts our industry because there is no way to learn the complex dance of working with others, managing 192+ tracks of audio, fixing a busted speaker, or any of the other million things that we do without people noticing unless you watch it done for a few years. Unless you have someone to show you a little, let you touch the controls, let you make "learning" mistakes while protecting you from career ending goofs.

I'm sorry, but that job is completely gone. Now you have to invent it from scratch. I am constantly trying to find some kind of way to bring back the apprenticeship model. But, its hard. Budgets and time limitations make it very challenging to do anything meaningful for anyone trying to learn the ropes. We all have to find a way.

I know I will never grow tired of being helped by people who know more than I do.. nor helping someone when I can.
Old 21st January 2011
  #55
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_T View Post
Seems like it kinda boils down to the person, not the school. I don't have anything against folks who go or went to these schools.

Guess what bugs me is the marketing. Just like the marketing for home recording gear ("mix your band's record from your macbook"), the article in the OP's link was about misrepresenting claims from the schools about success... Which would make sense. I don't think it's worth suing over - kids filing the lawsuit shoulda worked harder in school is all.
Couldn't have put it better myself. I attend LARS. It's mostly full of wanna be "producers" and rappers. My first class had 40 kids in it, now, 10 months later, there are 6 in my intermediate film sound lab. The professors are incredibly knowledgable and many have Grammy's and Emmy's. If you want to learn about the audio engineering, be surrounded by working professionals and have the dedication to spend 12 months in school 30+ hours a week and can get by doing so, I would recommend LARS. PM me with any questions about the school, I'll be more than glad to answer and inquiries.
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