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Inception music too loud Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 1st January 2011
  #31
Gear Maniac
 

I think you misunderstand my point. The only thing that is king is the final product. That is the only measure. So no, dialogue in every instance is not king. I think many of you are just used to bad scores and I understand why you subjugate the music to a secondary role.
Old 1st January 2011
  #32
Gear Nut
 

Seems to me that films released in theatres are mixed for that, and that mix is transferred to the dvd and bluray releases. If you're not watching it in 5.1 with it meant to be really loud, you wont get the sound you're looking for. I'm surprised they don't do a home surround mix as well as stereo mix option for the dvds/blurays, because nobody has the theatre experience in their house, so the mix does not transfer there correctly.
Old 1st January 2011
  #33
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Player1's Avatar
 

Player1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Henchman View Post
Dialog is king.
End of story.
And it has nothing to do with being a "Hollywood" movie.
And I wish all composers would simply accept that.
Right now I am mixing a show, and the composer is doing a fantastic job, scoring COMPLETELY around the dialog, where needed.

THAT'S composing.

Quite frankly, I think that in general, too much music is being used in a lot of Film and TV, where none is needed at all. Even documentaries I see this. They don't have a story, so they have wall to wall music.
Maybe a new category? Musical sound efx with visual support! Dialog is king for sure! Music and sound efx are designed to support the mood and action. Dialog is essential to telling a story, and while I understand the value of greatly placed music and sound efx if you have to fight for the dialog the story telling is generally weak. As far as the scoring there is plenty of places in film to show your stuff, but you got to know how to tuck when required.
Old 1st January 2011
  #34
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dr.sound's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadOrange View Post
I think you misunderstand my point. The only thing that is king is the final product. That is the only measure. So no, dialogue in every instance is not king. I think many of you are just used to bad scores and I understand why you subjugate the music to a secondary role.
Mr Orange,
Why don't sign your name to your post if your so sure that we (who do sign our names) don't know what a good score is?
Tell us what you have done, what you have observed.
Tell us more about YOU!

I do know great composers.
I have done numerous films with Christopher Young. He knows how to write around dialog.I have never been accused of not featuring music when possible.
Now start telling us about YOU and maybe we will understand your point of view.
Old 1st January 2011
  #35
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dr.sound's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by eighttwelve View Post
Seems to me that films released in theatres are mixed for that, and that mix is transferred to the dvd and bluray releases. If you're not watching it in 5.1 with it meant to be really loud, you wont get the sound you're looking for. I'm surprised they don't do a home surround mix as well as stereo mix option for the dvds/blurays, because nobody has the theatre experience in their house, so the mix does not transfer there correctly.
They do (some / most of the time) a "Nearfield Mix" . It is at a mixed on smaller speakers closer to the mixer at a reduced monitor level. Hardly ever do they do separate "stereo mix". The budgets don't allow it.
Old 1st January 2011
  #36
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minister's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadOrange View Post
to be honest, I find that music is given less space these days. FX now take up a huge amount of space.
Now? This has been an issue since at least 1977 (and many notable examples before). Ben Burtt did a lot sound for Star Wars that was buried or removed. A few music cues were removed or thinned because the FX told the story better. Some movies before this had a lot of SFX, and certainly a lot after this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BadOrange View Post
I've had to learn the hard way when I started out as an orchestrator as I wanted to show my aptitude and all these voice exchanges and counterpuntal fugue like material was completely lost once locked to screen. I do think you should orchestrate/compose around or perhaps in late fashion with the dialogue as to not get too mickey mouse ish , but I find whenever there is an intense scene and there are sound fx involved, the music is buried way in the back. COmposers really are left with FFF block chords.
This statement leads me to believe you are a music student.

The composer and orchestrators job is not to show their chops, it is to compose in a way that works for film story telling. Counterpuntal exchanges don't mean dookie if they detract from the story. Look at how Bernard Herrmann composed and orchestrated the films he worked on. It was revolutionary, but it was always in service to the film and not to show off his very formidable chops.

Being "Mikey-Mousey" means to mimic the on-screen action like Carl Stalling or Scott Bradley. To write AROUND the dialogue is not "Mickey-Mousing". It means composing and orchestrating in such a way as the music can continue underneath without drawing attention to itself and supporting the dialogue. Too thick and too busy and too many arrangement pyro-tekniks and you are not a very good film composer. You don't want to lower the level of music that is over-composed, you want to have a good level for well-composed film music.

If music is being pulled back, it could be that it is fighting with the intentions of the director. The Director (when they chose to participate) is king. The story is the most important thing. The mixers are there to serve the story and the Director's intentions (which may also be influenced by the Studio and any other political concerns). Composers don't decide how loud their music should be, they are only submitting another element to be used as the mixers and Director sees fit given all the choices put on the table. If you had worked on a lot of films, you would know this. In fact, I have even composed several scores to films I have mixed, and I don't feature my music when it is inappropriate. The film does not exist as a vehicle for the music. It is not my film, it is the Director's (or the producer's or the studio's). And even if there are differences of opinion, the Director has final say.

You should listen to people lik Dr. Sound and Gary. They have been there. They mix films. They love music; they know the power. But they are in the room, working on lots of films with lots of different directors, and they know how and when to use it and use FX. And they know that the dialogue is the most important thing, because it tells the audience what is going on, and it should be the main element against which all others are balanced. Though in the end, the Director will likely have the most influence on the sound and that can be a good or a bad result.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadOrange View Post
and yes, Zimmer makes extensive use of 5.1 Watching it on a DVD will sound different but I imagine for the dvd , they will err on the side of caution and make sure the dialogue is cutting thru.
What do you mean Zimmer does? He and his assistants and his scoring mixers submit 5.1 stems, but the re-recording mixers and director have final say over how 5.1 is used.
Old 1st January 2011
  #37
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ggegan's Avatar
BadOrange, the pecking order on the dub stage is dialog, then music, then FX. In all the films I have worked on, I have rarely seen an exception to that rule.

You are certainly entitled to your opinions, but my advice to you, should you happen to get an interview for a job on a mainstream feature project, is to be very careful what you say about how you think things should be done, lest you betray a lack of basic understanding of the widely accepted goals and priorities within the craft and industry.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #38
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I finally saw Inception on Christmas day. I have a 5.1 system in my house and I didn't notice that the music or sound design was too loud (this was on DVD, not Blu-Ray or cable). I'm going to watch it again in the next week and report, but it's possible that the movie theater didn't have their system properly calibrated.

As for those commenting on composers "stepping" on the dialog, it's my experience that sometimes, it's not the composer's choice: It's the Director or Producer's choice and it's difficult (although not impossible) to change their minds about certain scenes. As for documentaries and reality TV with too much music, hey, that's how many of us make a living. Library tracks. heh

On a side note, I thought Zimmer's score was absolutely phenomenal. For years, he was treading water, re-using the same theme either sped up or at a slower tempo (Gladiator, Pearl Harbor, The Rock, etc. all shared that theme). Something happened during the "The Dark Knight" score, where his composition sounded completely different and that growth was evident in the Inception score. If I hadn't known it was a Hans Zimmer score, I would have never guessed that he was the film's composer.

I thought the entire movie,from the production to the story to the score and the acting, was absolutely brilliant.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #39
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MicDaddy's Avatar
 

Riding the faders more at home watching movies than FOH.... seriously it's ridiculous.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #40
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BIGBANGBUZZ's Avatar
 

Inception music too loud

Did anyone else think music was over used in the film.
I guess it's a personal taste thing.

I do agree with MicDaddy a lot of DVD's seem to have way to much dynamic range for a domestic 5.1 theatre in a box , obviously no budget for a re-mix.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #41
Gear Maniac
 

I thought the music was overbearing and a bit too loud during the action sequences when I saw it in the theater. I also thought there was way too much dialogue in the script! The characters were constantly explaining everything. I'm guessing it was a big challenge to mix all of that dialogue, fx, and music during the extremely long action sequences.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #42
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.sound View Post
They do (some / most of the time) a "Nearfield Mix" . It is at a mixed on smaller speakers closer to the mixer at a reduced monitor level. Hardly ever do they do separate "stereo mix". The budgets don't allow it.
Ah, interesting. What do most dvds/blurays default to, the nearfield ones or the louder mix? Is the louder one usually the theater mix?
Old 2nd January 2011
  #43
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Dr.Wu's Avatar
 

didnt really care too much about the music or the movie but found the SFX way to loud.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minister View Post


This statement leads me to believe you are a music student.

The composer and orchestrators job is not to show their chops, it is to compose in a way that works for film story telling.



What do you mean Zimmer does? He and his assistants and his scoring mixers submit 5.1 stems, but the re-recording mixers and director have final say over how 5.1 is used.
I finished my masters a almost 3 years ago so still quite fresh. I do disagree and at the same time agree in that ingenuity and craftsman ship can be part of a score still working despite perhaps how most people won't notice or care. Most people do not comprehend the levels of structure of music and perhaps they enjoy it but I do not thing one has to make things at the lowest common denominator because only a few would find it gratifying. It was one of my first projects and I did not realize how low the music would end up and although it did not distract, I was just disappointed you couldn't hear it.

My intentions where not to show chops. It seemed logical and the progression of the score and the the coherency of the orchestration is something I guess i'm rather OCD about and I do take the actual entire work ie the movie as the goal, I really try to make something that is well crafted , well planned and for my self, a challenge. The decisions are ultimately how they fit to everything else on and my supervisor does tell me I don't need to put that much effort but it is important for me. He says it in a good way tho in that he finds the work I submit extremely well done and is surprised by the quality. I do spend alot of time and could do the work in a lot less time and get the same pay per page but while I work this temporary stepping stone, I find it important to have my work challenge myself and keep me interested and above all keep me learning.

Forgive the passage about the dialogue as my writing skills , well lets just say I often have a hard time explaining things with words. What I meant by mickey mousing is sort of the concept you talked about but rather to do with dialogue in a more sentimental way. I think I left out a negation somewhere which may have confused things more. So like a guy falls and the music mimics the action and has some sweep, dialogue is often accompanied by a similar concept in that the music sort of just mimics the intended sentiment a little too hard and I find it really hard to take.

And about Zimmer, I just used the name to represent the entire team. One of the engineers that I sometimes get to chat with and talk about his work as I do know less about that aspect talks about how their projects really make use of music and the 5.1 landscape compared to alot of other projects that tend to just keep music relatively stereo.

And finally , my contention with the statement dialogue is king , despite being true in a practical sense , is that I don't agree. I suppose I am opinionated and I am quite aware of how I view the work and how things are done. It isn't that I think dialogue should not be the most salient sound as that is usually what is required. But I view the end work as a whole each part being as important regardless of the given weight one item might have in the mix.

You are all absolutely right in a practical sense but I do not think music has to subjugate itself to dialogue. That is the usual prescription but I don't see it as a universal rule. I suppose my issue is that I am thinking of the work as a piece of art rather than a Hollywood film. I am aware of my ideal aesthetic and the way things actually work but I am also aware that I have not seen a good movie in ages due to so many aspects being regimented and copied over and over . So while my opinion does not match the current aesthetic and I would not be foolish enough to make this opinion as a junior at work but i do feel strongly about my opinion. Every decision would be made from the perspective of the final work without any pre drawn rules or prescriptions of where in the mix the dialogue should be and how music has to be at this level and how sound effects should be this loud.

anyways , i hope that clears my opinion.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #45
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zooce's Avatar
 

Filmmaking is about telling a story. The statement, "Dialog is KING," is obvious and absolutely true. But I think what sparks "controversy" over it, is the fact that it is also a very broad statement. I think a good way of putting it, as many have already said in this thread, is that when saying, "Dialog is KING," it doesn't mean that everything else necessarily, "Takes a back seat," it just means that everything else should be worked around it in a tasteful way.

When we're talking about the mix of film sound, I think Gary says it best by this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
Dialog is the standard to which all other elements must be balanced.
Then again I'm only a student and I have a lot to learn!!!

Happy New Year BTW!!!
Old 3rd January 2011
  #46
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That's funny I saw Inception opening night and I thought it was just bad sound in the theater because there where several times that I couldn't hear the dialog during that movie. Lol, I blamed it on the theater!

I have to say, that movie was a major let down. I thought that it would have been much better considering Leo was in it and the director...
Old 3rd January 2011
  #47
Gear Maniac
 

yes it is the wording that bothers me. I mean often dialogue can ruin a sequence where the actual moment would be better described with perhaps body language, maybe a soft utterance and the music perhaps making the dialogue even less at the forefront.

I will say that I really do not get much from Hollywood films except some lightweight fun like a Dan Brown book. But when you've already decided that the dialogue will trump everything else, it really does ruin any possible artistic opportunity to make the scene perhaps more effective. Dialogue happens in the form of music , words and body language. I think the objective should be to maximize the artistic worth of the film by balancing those items in a way that involves thought and a deep understanding of the movie and how these elements would best intertwine with the aim to convey the vision of the director. As opposed to having everything set to some standard.

I guess the problem is that things are so team oriented that it is hard to really make something truly cohesive as the guy making the mix has no input in any artistic decision and is mixing based on industry standards that work most of the time but at the cost of the oppurtnity in perhaps doing something unconventional that would make the film better

I have come to peace that it is an industry and art takes a backseat but that doesn't mean I can't have an opinion regarding how things should be. I am young and can handle some of the cringe as I am learning quite a bit but I think I would rather pursue an other career rather than becoming a complete automaton composing the same music for the same films over and over and over creating nothing of any value or merit. I do not think I could handle that sort of routine rather void of any real creativity. But I am enjoying what I do for the moment and take it as it comes.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #48
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Henchman's Avatar
Dialog is in a film to be heard. A movie is made and built around the script.
Period.
Everything else is added candy.
And if people walk away, having not understood some of the dialog because of too loud music or SFX, then that is not good. This has nothing to to with artistry, and everything to do with possibly missing key points of dialog.
Dialog is written to tell a story. Not to fill time. And in most films, the dialog is laboured on,written, re-written, and then re-written again. Almost every line is important. If a scene is supposed to be carried by SFX or music, the director will have made that choice, and there wont be any dialog there. In which case, the composer will be asked to do a soundalike for the temp music that everyone has fallen in love with for that scene.

But otherwise, yes. Dialog IS king.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #49
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Henchman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadOrange View Post
I will say that I really do not get much from Hollywood films except some lightweight fun like a Dan Brown book.
That's a pretty snobbish attitude to have in this industry.
I guarantee you, you'll get to a point in your career where you'll give your left nut to work on those lightweight Hollywood films.

I think John Williams is a pretty respected guy.
I'm pretty sure he's happy he didn't turn down the scoring job for a movie about a kid rescuing a princess with a couple of robots and a guy in a giant ape suit.

I don't turn down gigs. I enjoy mixing a reality TV shows as much as a Feature.
Because it means, I don't have to work a real job.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #50
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gsilbers's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGBANGBUZZ View Post
Did anyone else think music was over used in the film.
I guess it's a personal taste thing.

I do agree with MicDaddy a lot of DVD's seem to have way to much dynamic range for a domestic 5.1 theatre in a box , obviously no budget for a re-mix.

there was wall to wall music!!! amazing how much music there was.

i think the dialog was low and not the music too loud. if that makes sense

and who knows,,, maybe its on purpose to detract from some dialog lines so it didnt get too cheesy. heh
(same thing i think happens in the show sons of anarchy and other's to make the characters be more "Cool" by hiding the dialog and or script.
just some wierd thoery of mine, cause those shows i work with and once u play them back so many times, i think man thats some cheesy shiat!
but sure sounds cool
but this is how i think inception was:
dialog:
.a dream within a dream in the matrix of another dream..of another dream world o


and music music music music music on top getting louder...

plus the heavy ADR on the asian dude...

oh btw anyone saw the southpark spoof ? (insheeption)

btw2 ... those brass sounds where actually the wake up song in half speed, and slower and slower until it sounded like that. very clever by HZ.
each layer dream the wake up music (from edit piaf) was slowed down more and more.(plus all the other stuff of course)
Old 3rd January 2011
  #51
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Henchman View Post
That's a pretty snobbish attitude to have in this industry.
I guarantee you, you'll get to a point in your career where you'll give your left nut to work on those lightweight Hollywood films.

I think John Williams is a pretty respected guy.
I'm pretty sure he's happy he didn't turn down the scoring job for a movie about a kid rescuing a princess with a couple of robots and a guy in a giant ape suit.

I don't turn down gigs. I enjoy mixing a reality TV shows as much as a Feature.
Because it means, I don't have to work a real job.
It is no more snobbish than saying you prefer classical music to pop because you get more from it. I was talking about viewing films, not the work I am currently doing on said films. And i did not say I hated these low brow flics, only that you them and that is pretty much it. There are no layers of abstraction that can take years to study and digest, which is also why I liken it to a Dan Brown. Fun yes. Intellectually stimulating ? Not really. If that makes me a snob then I guess i'm a snob.

But I was quite clear in that I am learning alot so there is no down side and yes the movies are hollywood movies, in fact very big hollywood movies so to your statement about giving a left nut to work on a small film, I just don't see that happening. The second I stop learning and I find the work mundane, time to something I want to do.

The whole reason I chose music and devoted probably if you averaged it out 8 hours every day since I was 3 is that well officially I have aspergers and those nuts tend to like doing just one thing but I enjoy music and doing creative things I like and learning and getting better at it. If things start getting repetitive and I am not having any fun just like any normal job ( which to be honest I would not know about as the only normal job i've done was a paper route when i was in grade 4), I don't see the point. I can get a real job if I ever need to with steady hours and benefits that is music related and meets all those requirements I listed. I mean I went to curtis. I can pretty much get any theory composition job at any university. I think I would have to stop acting collegial and not ask the students if they have boyfriends. I do see your point but I have other options and this was a choice. See right there, that was being snobby but just to get into Curtis is pretty much a carte blanche at being snobby. I mean really i'm not because I don't really find what I do that particularly fantastic. It is more esoteric than most jobs but I mean if you think I was snobby now, well Imagine being a rocket scientist and how you would just walk around oozing of self entitlement. But music ? Kinda nerdy.

So to sum it up, perhaps I am a snob, maybe a nut, and no I would not give a nut to do a mundane job and do not see the novelty of a "music" job and when it comes down to it, if I ever find myself bored for a long period of time, and that doesn't have to do with what i'm working on but what I am doing with what i'm working that counts, I will do something else. So about the movie with the robot and would John Williams do it ? I don't know. I like robots most of the time and I don't see why he wouldn't like robots either. I would take a **** movie just so I can become friends with Keanu Reeves and play matrix until I get fired. But i've never just done something because of financial reasons. I think if I cared about money, I would of followed in my brother and sisters steps and been a lawyer or doctor. Money is just not something I thing about. I tend to give all of it to my girlfriend to manage as having to little makes me stressed and having too much also stresses me out because I feel like I should spent it. And i hate stress. Now I just realized that if she spent all that money, I would be in a position where perhaps a nut might be given for a small job. Well thanks alot Mr Hensley.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #52
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dr.sound's Avatar
 

Mr Orange,
Thank you for the last few posts. It gives us a better idea of where you are coming from. I do appreciate it.
Now another request, your name and some of the projects you have been associated with.

Thanks,
Old 3rd January 2011
  #53
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minister's Avatar
BadOrange,

Someday your experience will catch up with your opinion.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #54
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Henchman's Avatar
BadOrange, I think you misunderstood me.
I don't do what I do because I HAVE to.
I do it because I want to.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #55
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Kuba_Pietrzak's Avatar
 

I really wonder, if the OP (BIGBANGBUZZ) ever thought, that his comment on music in "Inception" would lead us to this point...

... really interesting



regards,
Kuba
Old 3rd January 2011
  #56
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Jfriah's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadOrange View Post
to be honest, I find that music is given less space these days. FX now take up a huge amount of space.
I just read this again; it's a 'poking fun' comment so (smile) I read those first two sentences and thought "is this guy a composer"?


Jeff
Old 3rd January 2011
  #57
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Jfriah's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGBANGBUZZ View Post
Having a great score is important, to great a drama be it TV or film.
I'm just saying the general public don't walk away and say, wow great score, or wow those Fx were cool.
They say wow what a film.

My favorite score is in No Country For Old Men.
Just tonal atmosphere that no one notices.
I, too, am a fan (personally---no slight meant to any composer that works hard to get their stuff 'heard' and deals with the constant revisions put upon them by the clients--the same clients that tell US "certain things" to try to get elements to be heard, manipulated, etc.) of sparse 'underscore' and 'score where required, where it supports and helps lead the viewer and to bend emotions'.

No Country for Old Men. CastAway. Two great examples from my personal faves.

And I don't say that 'the general public' doesn't walk away saying 'wow what a film'... they'll say things like loved it, hated it, it kicked a$$, that kind of thing. More often than not, they WILL say 'cool fx', or 'man that was loud'. Very few times do I ever hear people leaving a cineplex saying anything about the musical score (EQUALS JOB WELL DONE if you ask me), except for maybe some source tunes they heard and liked.

Yep, I'm another in the camp of "underscore, not noticed"

And, pursuant to the thread. To me, Inception score was noticed. Prevalently.

Jeff
Old 3rd January 2011
  #58
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Jfriah's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
...the misuse of music and sound FX in general.

I have a big problem with overbearing music or sound FX in films. I resent it when the director tries to use music to tell me what to feel about what is going on because they haven't shot a film or told a story that can stand on its own. The same goes for sound FX. I feel it is both a crutch and an insult.

I can't tell you how many mixes I've been on where directors have tried to make a boring scene exciting by pumping up the music or FX. All it can do is make a marginal scene louder, but it's still marginal. If it is a good scene, overly loud music and FX actually pushes the audience away rather than pulling them in. Music and sound FX can certainly enhance or fill in blanks in the story, but they can't make up for bad story telling.

My feeling is that the story is everything, and nothing in the soundtrack should draw attention to itself unless it is a story point. it should all be integrated to the point where the audience just accepts what they are experiencing as reality. When the sound FX or music become the focus, then the director has failed. Just by the fact that you are even commenting on the music tells me that the director failed to draw you into the story enough for you to suspend disbelief in the movie making process.
I felt the personal need to re-quote that again. And side with the 'in this perspective, as a re-recording mixer and a biased/educated film viewer' camp in saying that I'm with "Dialog(ue) is king".

I often joke with people saying 'If you don't like it, go back to making your silent movies!'

Again, absolutely not slighting anything composers do or create (we all have our tasks and jobs and that includes interpreting what a client says to us or, sometimes, DOESN'T say to us as mixers), but take a film you're familiar with that you have the ability to play 'at this very moment' and play it through the built-in speaker of your fave mp3 player/video player at a low volume.

It is just an interesting experiment.

Or at home (though, you're not playing fair because you have reverb in other speakers), unplug your center speaker for a movie and watch it that way.

How many filmmakers out there currently can tell their story without the use of the dialogue?

How many filmmakers out there currently can roll film/camera without the use of a script?

How many movie companies/investors out there currently want to bank on a film (or cough cough tv show cough) that has nothing in it except dialogue? Just straight, cleaned-up dialogue with no fx, no music, no foley?

So they all go together to help sell the piece but... What's #1 unless you're making an art film that has no dialogue? Heck, what has a specific speaker been created for to help placement / audience focus / to keep other things out of ? (oh yeah and then there's just that whole little 'mixing' thing, hahaha, many many fine mono films in the past)

If a tree falls in the forest...

But again I digress. I found Inception to be another 'quite carpeted' movie of noticeable music. Not faulting anyone, not praising anyone, just pointing out an opinion. Because hearkening back to the top of my post, some very very good comments about 'we do what we do but it is the person sitting behind - or sometimes beside- us that really sometimes makes the piece what it is, for good or bad'.

And, yes, if an audience is noticing things about any particular element unless for effect... (FAIL). "on most projects"



Jeff
Old 4th January 2011
  #59
Gear Addict
 

I still don't get the Inception mix bashing in this forum.

I had no problems hearing the dialogue, and I loved the soundtrack in general. Could have had something to do with the story, but hey.

YMMV.
Old 4th January 2011
  #60
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Loved the movie. There were a few small spots where the dialog was hard to hear on the internal speakers from my crappy early 90's bigscreen TV.

I just want to say how hard it is sometimes to appease everyone's taste. My dad wants the credits on a record to be 24pts because he's in his late 50's. The girl in the last band I mixed always wanted the vocal up on the record, while outside engineers (much better ones than myself) thought the vocal was TOO upfront.

I'm sure all kinds of testing is done on various playback systems, but you can't catch all of it. Watching movies at home there are always notes that ring out way too loud in the score due to the terrible terrible speakers in my tv.

With all the moaning about how things should be done, I like to sit back and just marvel that these things even get done. That a record even happens... so much goes into them that just finishing it is an accomplishment.

When people rip on Hollywood or Television or when ANYONE starts talking integrity I wish they would read Don't Get Too Comfortable by David Rakoff.

There are always a few unemployed arty types who want to say that since I do commercial music I'm not a real artist etc... i don't think art takes a back seat anywhere. The people making commerical art happen to be passionate artists IMO. I have yet to meet anyone stupid enough to try getting into art and film for all the easy money.
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