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small market biznus tactics
Old 16th August 2007
  #1
small market biznus tactics

I really enjoy working on films. I want more, MORE, MORE!!! It's just fun.

What are good methods for soliciting the local smaller markets? Advertising, small production films, TV, radio,... etc. Anything that may need music and engineering/editing.

Do you cold call?
Do you join some union or other group?
etc.

Aside from word of mouth.... What's a tactic for getting work?

Thanks
Old 16th August 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joenovice View Post
I really enjoy working on films. I want more, MORE, MORE!!! It's just fun.

What are good methods for soliciting the local smaller markets? Advertising, small production films, TV, radio,... etc. Anything that may need music and engineering/editing.

Do you cold call?
Do you join some union or other group?
etc.

Aside from word of mouth.... What's a tactic for getting work?

Thanks
Even in small markets the sorts of work you mention are mostly done by specialists who do a lot of that thing and a little of other stuff. Advertising is a particularly specialized area, which needs heavy and continual marketing. Radio is the same, and most of it is done by the stations themselves unless it is a big campaign, in which case it's done by the ad guys. Long form work like indie films and network stuff is mostly by word of mouth--producers getting names from each other. Most people establish themselves by getting lucky with a low/no budget project going big in some way, and getting their name around. Many people want to do this work, so you may find competition even for projects with little or no money. Your best bet might be to find a friend who is making an indie film and offer to work for them for free, esp if your creative visions line up and you think you'll be able to do some cool work on that project. A lot of doc work is bulk dialog cleanup, often no creative sound work beyond the mix of the music against the dialog is required. That sort of work is gotten by reputation, availability and price. Joining any sort of filmmaking group and schmoozing around could be very helpful. The union thing depends on where you live and what sorts of shows working in which sorts of situations you might have a shot at. Knowing some people already on the inside doing that work is very helpful.

Philip Perkins
Old 16th August 2007
  #3
Thanks for the words of expereince.

I'm finishing my first big project (documentry - all engineering and 20+ original music cues) and really enjoyed the process. I've made some money but very little compared to others here.

I will be moving soon and will be working as a professor. Sometime later, I want to establish a business that provides services like 5.1 mixing, audio restoration, specialized tracking and ADR, and music production for libraries and *for hire* projects (film score, advertising).

Obviously it is tough to break into a market. Do you think it is overkill to envision the above services? Would it be better to focus on one or a few?
Old 16th August 2007
  #4
Lives for gear
 
soundboy's Avatar
That would be a good question for the Minister. He does all that.
Old 16th August 2007
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joenovice View Post
Thanks for the words of expereince.

I'm finishing my first big project (documentry - all engineering and 20+ original music cues) and really enjoyed the process. I've made some money but very little compared to others here.

I will be moving soon and will be working as a professor. Sometime later, I want to establish a business that provides services like 5.1 mixing, audio restoration, specialized tracking and ADR, and music production for libraries and *for hire* projects (film score, advertising).

Obviously it is tough to break into a market. Do you think it is overkill to envision the above services? Would it be better to focus on one or a few?
If you can make it work for you why not? The business tends towards specialization, esp. in bigger markets, but there isn't any reason for you not to try if you can get the work. In a small market being able to do many sorts of things has high survival value.

Philip Perkins
Old 25th August 2007
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by minister View Post
i don't have much to say about this other than the common sense things of :

get yourself organised, get a business plan, do some research on the industry in your town. meanwhile, learn the basics of audio and audio post for picture. you are going to be offering a service and charging money for it. you better know what the h-e-double hockey sticks you are doing. judging from your posts, you are a decent person trying very hard to learn. but someone who doesn't know what a phantom center is should not be claiming they can mix a film. you really need to do a lot of homework. i am sorry to come of harsh, ......audio publicly screened.

also remember that for all your passion and desire there are 500 other people in your town with the same amount of passion and drive. not to mention all of the established places........ my composing gigs got sound design added to them and then i started doing more and more homework. but it took years. and i still have a lot to learn and there are people who know way more than me. ......if one is patient and works regularly ...
........and lastly, tell me to go to hell and prove me wrong and do it your own way. that can work too. what do i know?
Thanks for adding your thoughts. I take everything my elders say seriously and with some salt.

I have to say that I understand your position/warning in regards to my questions regarding the term "phantom center," but I can't let that prevent me from working. To me not knowing the term is trivial. These are the things you learn and without the job I may not have.

So I learned a new term, composed 20+ cues, and mixed my first film. Does it sound as good as the pros? Not a chance... BUT the director loved it and I learned a ****LOAD. It was WAY better than the director could have done and cost less than using a studio. After viewing the final product the producer has arranged two more jobs for me. I've got a comedy to mix and a film score to write for the producers friend.

Joe = 3
"Turning down work for fear of having to learn" = 0
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