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pascal and others - translation from nearfielsds to Theater
Old 3rd February 2007
  #1
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audiothings's Avatar
 

pascal sijen and others - translation from nearfielsds to Theater

Hello

I see that lots of Post houses are using nearfield surround monitoring systems like the blue sky 5.1 system for their smaller rooms...

Thx pm3 certification indicates that stuff mixed on pm3 monitors should translate well to Thx certified mix stages...no?

My question is... how is this system working with guys who've tried it? What if any are the translation issues? Does this mean that one can make the bulk of creative film surround mixing decisions in a nearfield monitoring environment and then move the project files to a proper mix stage just to double check? (and yes... what about x curve... is it implemented in pm3/nearfield monitoring situations as well

I realize that many pros from big post houses will be opposed to the idea... and i'm sure moving things to smaller studios as is happening with the music industry, will have many negative repercussions.... still I want to know whats possible

thanks and respect,
Old 3rd February 2007
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

Hello Audiothings:

I can't directly speak for all of our users, but people like Dennis Leonard (among others) at Skywalker Sound and users such as Robert Zemeckis (began using our systems during Polar Express) have given us very positive feedback. Having said that, there are always going to be perceived deferences between small pre-mix / post rooms and large dubbing stages, that will require small tweaks. The magnitude of the differences depend on the acoustics of the room, along with the proper calibration / configuration of the system. But, in general most users have expressed a great deal of confidence in our monitoring systems, in particular with regard to translation to larger dubbing stages and movie theaters.

With regard to THX pm3, the X-Curve and small rooms: If you are listing on nearfields and are direct field dominant, you typically don't have to worry about the "x-curve". This was explained in the post linked below, in particular this section:

All published experimenters have found that in a large room, a flat response near-field loudspeaker is subjectively best matched by a distant loudspeaker having a rolled-off high-frequency response in steady-state measurements. The source of the need for this measured rolloff appears to be the differing interaction of the sound field with the head, pinnae, and ear canal between a distantly originating sound field, and one originating close by, or by differences between transient and steady responses caused by the mechanism described in b) above. Since the need for such an apparent rolloff with steady state signals is shown, this standard documents the response for best interchangeability of product across many auditoriums.


More information here:
https://www.gearslutz.com/board/showthrea...40#post1108440

Depending on the acoustic conditions of the room, sometimes a slight ReEQ (THX's TM'd Name) is applied in smaller rooms. This is typically only necessary in rooms which are not properly treated (consumer rooms typically) and have a high amount of HF reflections, causing an HF spectral tilt in the response.

For more information on THX pm3, follow this link:
http://thx.com/studio/pm3design.html

I hope that helps...

Cheers!
Old 4th February 2007
  #3
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audiothings's Avatar
 

Quote:
a flat response near-field loudspeaker is subjectively best matched by a distant loudspeaker having a rolled-off high-frequency response
thanks pascal...sorry... as the originator of that thread i should have already got it!

i don't mean to open a can of worms or start a flame war... but is the future of audio post is going to be in the same direction as music production? As in, the bulk of the work (including surround mixing) gets done at smaller privately owned studios... a situation where engineers can afford their own setup (say, pt hd-x + nearfield monitoring in a 16 x 12 x 9 space)?

to give you a clue of where i'm coming from, i'm part time musician and full time engineer and run a studio along with my partner (who is the main composer). I'm considering adding a 5.1 monitoring system to my space, primarily because i want to do more for the smaller film projects... when non "blockbuster" oriented productions get into post, theres very little time/money for creative work, and this is something i can counter by extending the use of my studio, for the purpose.

thoughts and perspectives on this are welcome.

respect,
Old 4th February 2007
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by audiothings View Post
thanks pascal...sorry... as the originator of that thread i should have already got it!

i don't mean to open a can of worms or start a flame war... but is the future of audio post is going to be in the same direction as music production? As in, the bulk of the work (including surround mixing) gets done at smaller privately owned studios... a situation where engineers can afford their own setup (say, pt hd-x + nearfield monitoring in a 16 x 12 x 9 space)?

to give you a clue of where i'm coming from, i'm part time musician and full time engineer and run a studio along with my partner (who is the main composer). I'm considering adding a 5.1 monitoring system to my space, primarily because i want to do more for the smaller film projects... when non "blockbuster" oriented productions get into post, theres very little time/money for creative work, and this is something i can counter by extending the use of my studio, for the purpose.

thoughts and perspectives on this are welcome.

respect,
Hello audiothings:

I am sure others can chime in on this, with much more authority; but most of the "pre-mix" work being done for film post is already being done in smaller rooms. The cost of operating a big dub stage means that typically only the "final" work is done in a larger room. There are many independent editors and mixers working in smaller pro studios, or even from home, creating near "final" mixes or very complete pre-mixes.

However, at the end of the chain, the final mix is typically done on a large film style dub stage.

Cheers!
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