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Post your industry jokes and anecdotes here
Old 15th September 2015
  #1
Lives for gear
 
ggegan's Avatar
Post your industry jokes and anecdotes here

I'm tired of talking about technical stuff. Let's hear some good jokes and crazy stories! Post them here.
Old 15th September 2015
  #2
Lives for gear
 
ggegan's Avatar
I'll start things out with a story from many years ago when I was an ADR mixer.

About a year or so after Haing Ngor won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in "The Killing Fields" in 1985 I was booked to do an ADR session with him on a low budget war film about Viet Nam. On the day of the session the director came to the stage early and said he needed to have a serious talk with me about Hang. He told me that that what Hang went through in Cambodia during the wholesale slaughter was so traumatic that he was like a bomb waiting to go off. I needed to be super careful about how I interacted with him, because he could go totally psycho over the most unexpected things. He explained that he was worried that Hang was very intimidated by ADR and would freak out and walk out without finishing the film which would mean millions of dollars could be at stake. Just then I heard the door to the control room burst open and here was this crazy little Cambodian guy going totally berserk, screaming in a strange language with eyes the size of saucers, thrashing around and knocking stuff off the credenza. He got right in my face and started going off like he wanted to kill me and I was totally terrified. It lasted about 30 seconds when everyone started laughing hysterically and patting me on the back, especially Hang. It was all a joke. Hang was actually the sweetest most calm, polite and professional person you could imagine. Hang even gave me a signed copy of his book. He was an absolutely lovely and incredibly gentle person.

A short time later he was murdered in a senseless random shooting outside his home in LA's Chinatown. I was devastated when I heard the news.

Last edited by ggegan; 15th September 2015 at 05:06 AM..
Old 15th September 2015
  #3
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ggegan's Avatar
You don't have to name names if it will get you in trouble. Just Jokes you have heard are fine, too.
Old 15th September 2015
  #4
How many post engineers does it take to screw in a light bulb. Answer: none that is the gaffer's job. Insert drum roll here... fade to black!
Old 15th September 2015
  #5
Gear Nut
 

In 1985 the studio I was working for got a phone call to do the ADR with Al Pacino and Donald Sutherland on 'Revolution'. To this day I don't know why we got the work as ordinarily it would have gone to any one of 4 or 5 more established facilities. Maybe they were all busy. To say I was both nervous and excited would be an understatement. This was going to hopefully put our studio, which had only been going 2 years, on the map. Paccino was going to be with us for 2 days then followed by Sutherland for 2 as well.
His approach to ADR was refreshing as he would completely give it his all. He would replicate almost exactly what he was doing on screen - if he was falling down or carrying something heavy he'd do the same during the take. Everything had been going splendidly for about 4 or 5 hours and we got to a section where the ADR editor, because Pacino was running in screen for about 15 seconds, had broken it down into 3 sections rather than subject him to having to run about 100 metres. He watched it once and decreed that he'd do it all in one go despite all our protestations that he didn't need to. He took out all his change etc from his pockets, took off his shoes and prepared himself. I've never seen anything like it. He ran like a man possessed during the take. All the nouances of the breaths and gasps, considering he'd only seen it once, was extraordinary. He collapsed onto the sofa in front of the console and was exhausted. Hugh Hudson, the Director, and the dialogue editor and I were stunned at his commitment and brilliance. Whilst he was getting his breath back we decided to play it back and revel in this unique moment we'd all witnessed. Even typing this now, 30 years later, I still have a churning in my stomach. I hadn't recorded it. Don't ask me why. I thought about lying and blaming the console or it being an Act of God (but which God can have been this cruel?). They stared at me in disbelief whilst all I could hear was Pacino out of sight on the sofa close to death and still barely able to breathe. My career was hanging on a knife edge until Pacino said "Give me another couple of minutes and I'll do it again". What a gentleman and wonderful human being. I won't have a word spoken against the man!
There is another story about him that is terribly convoluted on the same film. And the Donald Sutherland episode was amazing. Hopefully I'll get round to posting them.
Old 15th September 2015
  #6
Gear Nut
 

I'm pre-mixing a Polanski film in Paris in 1986. The new studio had the first Neve automated console I'd ever worked on (faders only) and there were teething problems with virtually everything. The 35mm recorders were Sondor, and the console automation was an Adams-Smith synchroniser which was a nightmare. Eventually, because we were trying to get the film ready for Cannes and nothing worked consistently, we had to fly back to Twickenham Studios in London to do dialogue pre-dubs over night and into the morning and then fly back to Paris. We get back to Paris bleary eyed and decide to listen to what I'd done in London. No sound is coming out of the speakers so 2 or 3 people descend on the console. Obviously we're going to hear something as soon as the right button is pressed or patch cord that should be in or out is found. The film has been running about 5 minutes so I decide to go and stretch my legs whilst the engineers sort it out. I lean back behind the console to turn the studio lights on and by total coincidence the dialogue comes out of the speaker. I ask what the engineers have changed and they say nothing. I turn the lights off again and the dialogue goes. It transpired that whilst we were in London they had spent the night trying to sort out the endless problems we were having.......and had inadvertently wired the lights to trigger the record bias on the Sondor's. Genius!
Old 15th September 2015
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Thanks Dean, this stories made me chuckle (the first one I have heard before but it is still as good) :-)
Old 15th September 2015
  #8
Lives for gear
 
pethenis's Avatar
 

Prologue, this is how I rolled into the business: halfway through lawschool I decided I wanted to work in a music studio (doh). Called all the studio's I could find to see if they needed a teaboy. Not a chance, but I did get invited to a post company, who did so well on the videoside, that they wanted to add a studio.I was to be trained during the studio build on a DAR Soundstation. At the time (early 90's) a futuristic touchscreen DAW (8tracks!) that I still remember fondly.

4 months later, I know the DAW, know the analogue Studer board, how to chase TC and layback to Beta SP (top of the line then). Boss comes in and tells me we got asked to do an episode of a monthly corporate newsshow for a big airline. Last minute thing, had to start at 8 in the evening so they could make VHS- copies during the night... But no pressure, record the 4 tracks of the Betacam they come with in the DAR (sync on 1 and 2, music 3/4), bit of compression and EQ and layback. Do I feel ready for that?

Eager to show how invaluable I was to the company I say yes and spend the rest of the afternoon rehearsing what I knew (very little haha).

20.00, they're here, all 6 of them including 2 bigshots from the airline. The producers look nervous, the bigshots look grumpy. I swallow once more and record the tracks from tape, doesn't sound too bad, maybe I can make this work?

Then the bomb drops, they hand me a big reel, could I layback to this? It was a C-format, a big clunky reel to reel video machine we had in the machineroom, but never used. I'm starting to sweat and say it may take a while to set it up. I can feel they are getting nervous, remarks like "in the other studio it was never a problem" don't help me.

I manage to connect it al (wasn't even wired to the machineroom patchbay), but for some reason I can't hear the return signal. For those who never mixed straight to tape, the only way to do pickups is to rewind, play, quickly A/B between what's on tape and what you're sending, get it sounding the same and punch in.

And then I decide to wing it... I couldn't take the pressure in the room, couldn't man up and say I wasn't able to do it, I just winged it. Lots of punch ins and I didn't hear a single one coming from tape. Needless to say we never heard from them again, but I had a great boss who never held it against me. Probably realised he shouldn't have left me alone on this one.

Ah, the early days, great fun.

Last edited by pethenis; 15th September 2015 at 05:43 PM..
Old 15th September 2015
  #9
Lives for gear
 
NReichman's Avatar
 

...and there was the slightly annoying intern at a Manhattan music house that was asked (at a critical moment during the mix) to go across the street to Radio Shack to get another 12db of headroom.
Old 15th September 2015
  #10
One of my first feature film post jobs was in 1996 in Italy, on Francesco Rosi's "The Truce". I must say I was quite young at the time (23), and had been sort of "sold" as a know-all sound editor to the ageing dialog editor/coach (72 at the time) so that the production sound mixer could rent out his Akai DD1500 for the sound edit (good 'ole thing was built like a tank! ... the Akai, not the dialogue coach).
Not to knock Italian foley artists, but when it came the time to do the foley for the film I wasn't quite confident. They had a habit of doing all the foley for the film in 2 days (as I was told), with three foley artists working simultaneously which would have made resynching anything a living nightmare. So I called a French foley artist I had started working with and all was agreed for him to come down to Rome for two weeks to do the job.

Now the film was quite long, and 3/4 of the movie has hundreds of extras on screen milling around, so there was a lot of work to do. So we didn't check our watches often...
Then one evening, while we were working: ALL THE LIGHTS AND GEAR GO OUT! Bam! Just like that. Ever the boy scout at the time (with various Leatherman, Maglite and stuff like that usually hanging off my belt (yes I WAS young)) I jump - in complete darkness - to where I remember having left my jacket, find it and the Mini-Maglite in the inside pocket, and then rush up the stairs (basement studio) just as the janitor was closing the heavy metal gate to the studio street entrance!
Man was I pissed! The more so as he started telling me off for being there in the first place!

The guys never even checked that the studio was running, and cut the mains every evening. I would NOT like to be their audio gear maintenance guy...
Old 15th September 2015
  #11
Also, on the same movie, me being advised by aforementioned dialog coach that one of the local mixers is not the sharpest tool in the shed:
him: that guy is useless, he just punches in in the morning and then reads his paper all day
me: what? you mean he starts recording and then just leaves the gear in record?
him: no... he punches in at the time clock, and then reads his paper. I guess he doesn't even get round to recording anything.
Old 15th September 2015
  #12
Gear Maniac
 
Oliver.Lucas's Avatar
I was booked to record a TV commercial voice over with a very successful (muti platinum selling/stadium touring) German pop singer to promote her new album. I had never worked with her before.
After we had finished she asked if there was anything more I needed to record.
I said that I was fine with the takes I had and that I would not mind leaving early that day because it was my daughter's birthday.
She asked for her name, and quickly jumped back to the microphone saying "Hit record Ollie, this is for your daughter...." Then she started singing a quick version of happy birthday exclusively for her.
Old 15th September 2015
  #13
Lives for gear
 
pethenis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oliver.Lucas View Post
I was booked to record a TV commercial voice over with a very successful (muti platinum selling/stadium touring) German pop singer to promote her new album. I had never worked with her before.
After we had finished she asked if there was anything more I needed to record.
I said that I was fine with the takes I had and that I would not mind leaving early that day because it was my daughter's birthday.
She asked for her name, and quickly jumped back to the microphone saying "Hit record Ollie, this is for your daughter...." Then she started singing a quick version of happy birthday exclusively for her.
Totally forgot about my similar experience, I had the Dutch "Bob the Builder" for a VO. When I told him my four year old was a big fan, he improvised something using my sons name a lot. He did about 4 other voices on that show and switched seamlessly. The look on my sons face when i played it to him ;-)
Old 15th September 2015
  #14
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sakamoto's Avatar
 

Old 15th September 2015
  #15
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lemix's Avatar
Some of you might not relate to the subject, please just skip it.
Also names with be withheld.

You should know that I live and work in Toronto, Canada.
And...the local NHL franchise, the Maple Leafs had a rare conference final run in the 1993 ( IIRC) playoffs. That is of course a truly historical event, because they suck...plainly put. I'm not a fan.
However, there are more than plenty around here and to celebrate the occasion a monster media even was launched in support.
A local newspaper and TV station sponsored it and ran a contest for a cheering song to be played everywhere, sold on cassettes and used for fundraising.

Our studio ( well established professional downtown room/advertising, music and video post ) donated time to record the winning song, performed by a famous Canadian country/folk group .
Three guys ( brothers ?), sing and mostly play stringed instruments, some other musicians ...and the Leaf's coach ( nice man, sadly passed away ) "playing" an acoustic gtr just for the shoot.

I was assigned to engineer the session, given three hours unpaid for the good cause.
OK..
Arrives the winner dude, the band and sports reporters.
Session went fine, taped on 24 track 2".
Then more media, cameras, catering and the Coach with his gtr.
I set him up in the gobo and everyone really wanted him to be recorded on the track.
Mic set, level set cans OK...he starts to play.

I'm fairly outspoken and never let mediocre stuff go by...so I said;
can one of the musicians help him to tune up ?
That was the first time many of the now fairly large number of attendees
directed strange looks to me.
He was a beloved sports hero after all.

All went down, quick mix, cameras rolling, posters and champagne everywhere.
As everyone is leaving the sponsor heads and the coach asking me if I would want a some swag and ( a very much sought after ) Leafs ticket in the VIP box.

Then I said :
"sure, thanx . Appreciate the cups and T-shirts.. I only take the Hockey tickets if the St.Louis Blues are playing.

The reaction in the entire room was shocking. Silence..cameras unplugged, people leaving.

True story, that I'll never forget.
BTW..I'm a hardcore Blues fan
Old 15th September 2015
  #16
Early in my career, I was regularly recording VO for educational productions (before Prop 13 in Calif.) One day, the regular male and female VO artists take their spots behind the mics and start warming up while I get levels and such. As I soloed the ladies mic, I kept hearing this swish - swish - swish as she read. She had the habit of doing rather large gesturing, and on this particular day, she had just come from the gym and was wearing this nylon sweat suit. I told her the nylon was making noise, and so could she remove the jacket for recording? She paused a moment, and then dutifully removed the jacket. What she failed to mention was that she was only wearing a bra underneath... and it was one of the those thin, sheer types. Well, the male announcer, the gentleman that he was, sprang up and offered her his jacket in a feeble attempt to conceal the"distractions". During the entire session, she was flailing her arms and several times the jacket became, well, less functional. I have no idea what was recorded, and that I probably took horrible take notes.
Moral: Be careful of nylon clothes.
Old 15th September 2015
  #17
Deleted 7f9cade
Guest
Approached with a crap short film.

"We have zero time left and no budget. Can you help us with sound?"

"Sorry, but no"

"Well how about a few pizzas as payment?"
Old 16th September 2015
  #18
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ggegan's Avatar
I remember years ago when I was a machine room operator and after the mix the director walked in holding out a ten dollar bill as a tip for the four of us like he was "Mr. Big-Time" (in those days the backroom crew was a recordist, two loaders and a projectionist). I felt like a parking lot attendant.
Old 16th September 2015
  #19
Deleted 7f9cade
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggegan View Post
I remember years ago when I was a machine room operator and after the mix the director walked in holding out a ten dollar bill as a tip for the four of us like he was "Mr. Big-Time" (in those days the backroom crew was a recordist, two loaders and a projectionist). I felt like a parking lot attendant.
You should have taken the $10 and given him two $5s back. Act like he wanted change.
Old 16th September 2015
  #20
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ggegan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 7f9cade View Post
You should have taken the $10 and given him two $5s back. Act like he wanted change.
We thanked him for his kindness, went out for a few beers after work and just laughed it off. He meant well. When is the last time anyone here received a tip of any amount?
Old 16th September 2015
  #21
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ggegan's Avatar
This is all great stuff! Just what I was hoping for. Everyone has a story and I want to hear them all.
Old 16th September 2015
  #22
Around Christmas last year I did a last minute rush mix and the director gave me a decent bottle of wine. I don't drink, so I waited one morning and gave it to our trash man as he was making his rounds. He was very happy. Making friends with the trash guys has proven to be an excellent choice. I mean I hardly ever get tips but when was the last time one of those guys got a tip?!
Old 16th September 2015
  #23
Gear Maniac
 
PeteJE's Avatar
Jumps up and exclaims "Sudden production bonus!" then whips out about 15k in cash and rips of 3-4 100 dollar bills to everyone in the room during the dub.

Any guesses who? (I have heard it is common with this person)
Old 16th September 2015
  #24
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteJE View Post
Jumps up and exclaims "Sudden production bonus!" then whips out about 15k in cash and rips of 3-4 100 dollar bills to everyone in the room during the dub.

Any guesses who? (I have heard it is common with this person)
Father Christmas?
Old 16th September 2015
  #25
Lives for gear
 

Not audio, but still somewhat related field:

Back in the day I worked as a set manager on higher-end shootings for commercials a lot.
One day, boyfriend of the young actress comes to the set, first time for him. Everyone's really friendly to him, he's even offered a seat in front of one of the director's screens to see his GF act.

Shot was for a big bank and one of their credit offerings.

Scene is set up, director shouts 'Action', boyfriend head turns red quickly and he runs out of the room.
Everybody was like 'what the ****..?'

Seems his GF didn't tell him her role was to pour bottles of champagne into a tub over the naked body of a really ugly fat guy, throw roses over him and then enter the tub in her sexy underwear..
Old 16th September 2015
  #26
Gear Nut
 

I'd been warned in advance of recording the ADR on 'Revolution' that Donald Sutherland could be tricky. I should have put 2 and 2 together when the Director wasn't there for Donald's arrival. He didn't show until about 4 hours in....and then left after about an hour.
I attempted to introduce myself as did the ADR editor when he arrived. He walked past me and said whilst pointing at the mic,
"Do you do the recording"?
"Yes"
"I want the mic right by my mouth. I don't want any of this crap about having it 2 or 3 feet away. I want the full timbre of my voice".
Pointing at the ADR editor he said,
"And I don't want any of this 'Can we do another one for sync?' because it's your job to get it in sync".
The battle lines were drawn.
The first line he had to do we were told "I'm not doing this as you can make it sound better with all your equipment". I briefly tried to put up a small amount of resistance but it was futile.
In 2 days he didn't at any point drop his guard. There were no 'pleases, thank you, good mornings, hello, goodbye's'.
Donald went out of the studio during the first afternoon and we thought he'd be back in 2 or 3 minutes. 10 minutes later he hadn't returned.The projectionist got on the talkback and told me to come to the projection room. He intercepted me outside and told me to go into the projection room as he was slightly concerned because Donald had been walking from wall to wall for 10 minutes just saying the word "****" repeatedly. I went in on the pretext of looking for something and sure enough that was exactly what was happening. He continued for another 5 minutes and then returned.
A week later a sound editor friend of mine, who is a brilliant mimic, recounted how he too had worked with him on a previous film and he'd been equally difficult.
Fast forward to months later......I get a phone call in the studio and the voice says "This is Donald Sutherland I want to speak to Dean Humphreys". It was a brilliant impression of him but it was clearly my friend. I told him I was busy and put the phone down. 2 minutes later the phone rings again and this voice says "I want to speak to Dean Humphreys. Someone hung up on me earlier". It was the great DS all along and I of course apologised explaining that clearly he'd been put through to the wrong department or office and that I'd look into this appalling behaviour.
He was playing the painter Gaugin, was in Oslo (I think) and had told the Director that he wanted to do his ADR in London. "I've told him it's the best studio I've worked in".
I'm now sitting there open mouthed and wondering if this was a parallel universe moment.
Fast forward to a few weeks later....he comes in with an entourage of people, shakes me warmly by the hand, says "Hi Dean, it's great to see you again" and we all carry on as though we're life long friends.
Old 16th September 2015
  #27
Gear Nut
 
Mister_T's Avatar
 

This one's embarrassing, but it REALLY made me appreciate who I work for...

Finishing up a monster documentary mix. Lots of 14+hr days, Sundance deadline, very particular clients and a lot of cooks in the kitchen. The last day it feels like the end of a Vietnam tour. Been through hell together but everyone is clapping each other on the back.

Director says, "Hold on a minute, I forgot..." and runs out the door. He comes back with a case of beer and we all crack one open.

Now keep in mind, I ALWAYS keep my drinks on a side table. But I'm tired and we start shooting the **** while I transfer files to their drive. The producer asks how long the transfer will take. I spin around in my chair to check the progress bar and hear a GERSPLOOSH as 12 ounces of IPA wash across the console. Every one freaks out.

I start mopping it up with my shirt, Kleenex - the director runs to get paper towels. I power off the board. Files are transferred. They leave sheepishly and wish me good luck and good night. I call my wife, ask her bring all the canned air and electronics cleaners we have. She shows up and we do what we can, but it's no use. The whole board smells like a brewery and 8 faders are dead. The lights flicker on and off like a burnt-out strip club sign. So I make the call to my boss. Sweat is pouring off me. My wife looks nervous.

Me: "We finished the mix"

Boss: "Great.... What's up"

Me: "I uh.... spilled beer on the console"

Boss: "...."

My whole career starts flashing through my mind. My wife will have to take a second job. I'll be blacklisted. All those B movies I've worked on... All for nothing. Years of my life lost to a stupid, delicious mistake. Maybe I could start a food truck business.... Then I hear laughter on the phone.

Boss: "Don't worry about it."

Me: "What?"

Boss: "Go home, we'll deal with it in the morning."

The next day we send the console to a local shop to get fixed. I ask how much it'll cost, offer to pay for the work and any parts. Bosses refuse. They just tell me that these types of things happen and not to beat myself up about it. They didn't fire me, insurance paid for the fix, and in a few days the console was back in place. I did get some ribbing around the office and the suggestion to "lay off the sauce."

That's why I like working on independent films. Low-stress, and you get to work with people who care about the right things. I won't knock anyone who wants to be the next Gary Rydstrom or Ben Burtt. But it can be great to have the camaraderie that comes with working with friends at a place that feels like Cheers.
Old 17th September 2015
  #28
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ggegan's Avatar
Some years ago I mixed a very strange feature that had two directors. One wasn't a replacement for the other, they were partners in crime. During the mix there was a fair amount of disagreement between them but they always worked it out except for one reel, which they were so far apart on that they decided to mix it twice - once for each director and then they would see which was better.

After we mixed both versions we watched them back several times and both directors started lobbying everyone in the room to vote for their reel, but no way was anyone going to give an opinion so the argument went on and on and on and got more and more heated. Finally a UPS driver walked on the stage with a delivery for someone so the two directors grab him and make him sit down and watch both reels and then tell them which one he liked best.

Last edited by ggegan; 17th September 2015 at 01:22 AM..
Old 17th September 2015
  #29
Gear Nut
 

The studio I worked for in the mid 80's was owned by a film/TV Director called Tony Palmer. His forte and reputation was built on making films about music and composers (his credits are on IMDB). He had a cleaner called Mrs Thompson who's ability to be unbelievably forthright and vulgar was in inverse proportion to her height. She was 4'9" tall. On day 1 of Al Pacino doing his ADR with us Hugh Hudson asked if we had a U- Matic as he wanted to show Pacino some cut material. The only machine we had was in Tony's bedroom/office and nobody apart from Mrs Thompson was allowed in there. I worked there for 4 years and never saw the room. I called Tony and asked him to come into the studio where I introduced him to Hugh and Pacino. He was thrilled and was at this charming best with them. Hugh asked if he could run the U-Matic and Tony said to follow him to where he had the U-Matic in his office/bedroom. Later that afternoon another U-Matic tape was delivered. In the meantime Tony Palmer had gone out on business and wouldn't be back until the following morning. On the morning of the 2nd day of ADR Tony comes flying into the studio and starts to apologise to Hugh and Pacino. "I'm so sorry....etc etc". I had no idea what he was apologising for.
On the afternoon of day 1 when the 2nd U-Matic tape was delivered they both to Tony's room to run it. Mrs Thompson went into the room, sees 2 people she's never seen before and who shouldn't be in the room, and tells them to get out. Hugh starts to explain but Mrs T is having none of it. She starts to drag Pacino off Tony's bed and tells them both to "**** off out of Mr Palmer's room".
Hugh later explained that as Mrs T grabbed Pacino he thought he'd let her know just who it was that she was manhandling. "That's Al Pacino" but again she was totally unbothered.
When Tony returned the following day Mrs T recounted the whole incident to him. She explained that there were 2 men in his room and that she had thrown them out. "Oh, you know the bloke I grabbed hold of. You did a film about him. Puccini".

Last edited by DEAN HUMPHREYS; 17th September 2015 at 02:31 PM..
Old 17th September 2015
  #30
I worked for a PBS station. I was the on air duty director and TD. Next to me sat my audio engineer. This was in the days of allowing smoking in the control room and RW, my audio engineer, always had a large cigarette ash on his cigarette. It was always dropping off onto the audio console. He also drank a lot of Pepsi and always had a big bottle of the soft drink on his audio console. My on air stint was from 4 pm to midnight. We had a local live on air news show at 10 pm. About 8 o'clock one one particular evening RW is talking about something and is wildly gesturing and knocks the the whole bottle Pepsi into my switcher. Lots of sparks lots of smoke and we go off the air. Our EIC was the best and immediately decided that we should move our operations to the news suite with its own switcher and audio console. We did all the patching and got back on the air in 30 minutes or less. The audience at home (estimated at 2 million) probably never knew what happened but we were back on the air in record time. There were some problems with setting up the news show but everything ran smoothly. I was also the TD of the news show so for me it was easy. We finally signed off at midnight. The next day we got a message from our bosses that effective immediately there was to be no drinks in the control room and anyone caught with one would be let go. They also banned smoking which was hard for RW and the EIC who were both chain smokers. That night the EIC took the Pepsi soaked switcher and put in in a large tub and washed it down with steaming hot water. He also blew the whole thing out with compressed air and put two heaters on it over night. He stayed at the station and by the time we signed on at 8 am the master control switcher was back in working order and everything was back to "normal" The EIC got a lot of kudos from the staff and management for all his "extra work". It was a great place to work and as you can tell a lot of really committed people working there.
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