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Music biz: piracy our "climate change," governments must act!
Old 22nd January 2010
  #1
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Music biz: piracy our "climate change," governments must act!

Music biz: piracy our "climate change," governments must act!

Quote:
The global music industry trade group IFPI has released its Digital Music Report 2010, a 30-page document that makes a single argument: copyright infringement is a form of "climate change" for creative industries, and "we look to governments for action."

According to this view of the world, the music business has now tried its hand at being "innovative" and "customer focused." It disaggregated albums, it allowed music to go up on everything from Amazon to iTunes to Spotify to Last.fm. It sued users, it launched education campaigns. Nothing worked. It's now time for governments to step up.
We've got numbers

The report trots out a host of statistics to make its point. The music business is 30 percent smaller than it was in 2004, and is off by even more than that in countries like Spain. At the same time, though, digital single sales grew by 10 percent in 2009 and digital album sales grew by 20 percent.

One obvious explanation for this trend might be that people aren't buying (more expensive) CDs but are buying (much cheaper) digital singles. This factor alone must surely account for a pretty sizeable percentage of the 30 percent decline in music industry revenues, but it's mentioned in only a single sentence. When digital downloads account for 40 percent of the total US music market, you might expect that the economic implications of this shift would be more prominent. But you'd be wrong.

That's because the decline is due to piracy (and "piracy" is the preferred term in the report, sometimes varied by a reference to "digital piracy"). IFPI admits that only 15 percent of European Internet users even engage in piracy at all, and it further admits that many of these users purchase music, but it still claims that piracy is the "fundamental problem."
My fave bit.....
Quote:
"One year the band played Valmiera, the biggest music festival in Latvia. We drove in from the airport and heard our songs on the radio. We headlined the festival and the 10,000-strong crowd roared out our songs. When we came off stage I asked our label representative how many records we had sold in Latvia. The answer was like a slap in the face. 200."
Old 25th January 2010
  #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GearBit View Post
My fave bit.....
Obviously their problem was that they weren't selling T-Shirts, bolo ties, baseball caps and autographed bongs. If they had, they would be millionaires....irhgt???
Old 28th January 2010
  #3

"According to this view of the world, the music business has now tried its hand at being "innovative" and "customer focused." It disaggregated albums, it allowed music to go up on everything from Amazon to iTunes to Spotify to Last.fm. It sued users, it launched education campaigns. Nothing worked. It's now time for governments to step up."

That is - I got my ass beaten after school because I'm a ****** and now I'm gonna call my older brother or my daddy to do something about.

Or - I made a mess but I won't clean it.

Veeeeery nice.
Old 29th January 2010
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diogo_c View Post

"According to this view of the world, the music business has now tried its hand at being "innovative" and "customer focused." It disaggregated albums, it allowed music to go up on everything from Amazon to iTunes to Spotify to Last.fm. It sued users, it launched education campaigns. Nothing worked. It's now time for governments to step up."

That is - I got my ass beaten after school because I'm a ****** and now I'm gonna call my older brother or my daddy to do something about.

Or - I made a mess but I won't clean it.

Veeeeery nice.
With all due respect, just like downloading without permission, beating people up is illegal (not to mention mean spirited). I'm not sure that comparing downloaders to gangs is an analogy that helps your side of the debate ....

Peace.
Old 29th January 2010
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by diogo_c View Post

"According to this view of the world, the music business has now tried its hand at being "innovative" and "customer focused." It disaggregated albums, it allowed music to go up on everything from Amazon to iTunes to Spotify to Last.fm. It sued users, it launched education campaigns. Nothing worked. It's now time for governments to step up."

That is - I got my ass beaten after school because I'm a ****** and now I'm gonna call my older brother or my daddy to do something about.

Or - I made a mess but I won't clean it.

Veeeeery nice.

you have a strange way of looking at the world.

in truth there is a mob beating up the man who can't defend himself because no one can stop them (the music industry being robbed by pirates) but now has the rightful protection of justice (See Biden's Anti-Piracy task force, and media giants awakening to the issue).

I find it hard to believe, that in the world we live in, the greatest battle youth culture can find to fight is the recorded music industry - and only because it threatens the free supply of illegally obtained music.

classic.
Old 29th January 2010
  #6
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvetstudios View Post

I find it hard to believe, that in the world we live in, the greatest battle youth culture can find to fight is the recorded music industry - and only because it threatens the free supply of illegally obtained music.

classic.
I'm not sure the youth or masses ever even choose what to do....they are told!

It's slightly deeper and more complicated then just the youths choosing to fight the record industry, ****, I know plenty of people who are anything but youths who pirate frequently.

It's all messed up, big time. Don't just blame it on the youths...if they have ever had the mind to make it themselves, well, they never have so we can just toss that idea out right now...The youth are only as good as those that educated them and brought them up. Blame the schools, blame the parents, blame television and movies and all the continuous lies we tell them apparently for their benefit

anyways

peace
Old 30th January 2010
  #7
You're right, it's people of all ages.
And more importantly, there's no ideological battle going on.
I talk to people who download illegally.
Their motive is simply consumption.
They want to own lots of music, they don't want to, or more usually don't think to pay for it.
It's really as simple as that.
There is no fight against the evil record companies. They honestly don't even add two and two together and realise how damaging to artists downloading is.
It's just there..... offered to them...... as much music as they want, via a quick download and nothing to pay.
All this ideological stuff is completely on the periphery.
Old 30th January 2010
  #8
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Id Ridden, chrisso, you are right. Education is key.

The superbowl would be too expensive and appeal to the wrong demographic IMO, but I think the RIAA should have had a very family friendly ad right before Obama's State of the Union Address the other night. A very high profile, authentic, respectable artist (Sheryl Crow?) with some "smaller" folks from the biz that are being affected horribly by the downturn. Emphasize the message with a plea such as "the recent economy FAIL is bad enough, please don't take our last breath away downloaders ...". Aim it at parents. "Do you know what your kid is doing on the computer, do you care? ....". "Theft is wrong and it does have consequences ....".

Use an actual case, no actors, just the sad truth for these people. One minute of silent message being said, no music bed because music might be dead. Use silence as a weapon! RIAA could throw a few bucks at the video houses for the ad. I'm sure they could use the work.

P.S. - I'm over a 100 posts now so you all have to do what I say ... heh
Old 30th January 2010
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
You're right, it's people of all ages.
And more importantly, there's no ideological battle going on.
I talk to people who download illegally.
Their motive is simply consumption.
They want to own lots of music, they don't want to, or more usually don't think to pay for it.
It's really as simple as that.
There is no fight against the evil record companies. They honestly don't even add two and two together and realise how damaging to artists downloading is.
It's just there..... offered to them...... as much music as they want, via a quick download and nothing to pay.
All this ideological stuff is completely on the periphery.
all true.
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