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The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!
Old 14th June 2014
  #1
The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!

I know, I apologise for the terrible name!

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-j3.jpg
The view I would like to maximise!

This summer I hope to start construction of a "Shedio" (that is, a studio in a shed). I use the term studio loosely as it is more of a hobby space, a place for me to relax in away from the main house. I am currently set up in the dining room and there are no doors between there and the lounge, making it a very noisy place to try and work. Hence why I am in need of a space of my own.

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-j1.jpg
As you can see, a purpose built room is long overdue!

About Me:

I am 21, just starting out in music production, although I have been playing piano for about 11 years. I stopped having music lessons about 3 years ago because learning by rote was getting tiresome, and I wanted to stretch my imagination a bit. Thus, I picked up a copy of Reason 5 and started making some songs. Admittedly as you would expect, it hurts to go back and listen to my early attempts, but I am steadily improving. I have always preferred to learn on my own, using trial and error to find out what works and what doesn't, how to use this, what that does etc.

(Just don't ask me what my current job is!)

Anyway, now I am in the process of designing my own space to live and "work" in. I have already been commissioned to produce all the music for a video game, so whilst I am not in too much of a rush, it would be nice to have this studio built whilst the weather is warm (or at least the main basics of it).


The Plan:

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-j2.png

So here is my current plan. Note this is version 12 - there have been so many changes of plan and also a change of location that it now looks a lot different to how it originally did!

As you can see I am limited to a 4.1m x 6.1m plot of land at the bottom of the garden. I am not constrained on having to adapt to an existing building, but I do have to be wary of budget as it is certainly a finite resource. The plan is to have a small live room (for the occasional friend who wants to pop over), a slightly smaller control room, and two tiny booths. One will be the lobby/emergency iso room, the smaller will be an emergency iso/machine room.

As my mainstay production is via MIDI keyboard, the lack of space in the live room isn't really an issue. I should note I have been researching studio design for the last couple months, hopefully that might show through... a little!

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-jp1.jpg
Overall view

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-jp2.jpg
Live room looking west

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-jp3.jpg
Live room looking east

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-jp4.jpg
Control room looking west

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-jp6.jpg
Control room looking east (lobby/Iso1 on right)

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-jp5.jpg
Machine room/Iso 2

Here are some things I should point out:

i) I really want a window in the live room, and also the control room. Having to work in a tiny room without windows is no fun (I know this from experience). It makes for a depressing room no matter how stylish the inside may be.

ii) I am aware the above will mean the effectiveness of sound proofing will be diminished

iii) I am not clued up on HVAC (to be honest, I'd prefer an open window)

iv) You may have already guessed, I am not TOO concerned about sound proofing (although there is a need for a moderate amount)

v) I plan to float the floors, the walls will be of staggered stud construction.

There are a few issues that will need to be addressed prior to the foundations being constructed (mainly shoring up the bank of the stream), so progress may be non-existent for the first few weeks. Most of the work will be done by my dad (he is a carpenter/builder) and I.

So there you have it, if you read this far, well done! If you just skipped most of it, that's what the pictures are there for.

Any questions, constructive advice etc, fire away!
Thanks for reading
Jam
Old 14th June 2014
  #2
neb
Gear Maniac
 

Hi Jam, that's a lovely outlook in the first pic.
Question: did you consider building one open room with a couple of small booths or amp closets?
I only ask because the 4x6 is already quite small and also your main use will be midi programming...
Also, what's your plan for floating your floor?

All the best with the build.
Old 15th June 2014
  #3
Thank you for taking the time to respond!
My original plan was to have one room (and indeed it cropped up again in my mind earlier today). I was just looking actually at the possibility of constructing some "gobos" to use to split the building up. So it is interesting that you mention this.
I will give this some further thought.

As for the floors, I actually drew some diagrams to help my dad for when we get around to construction, so hopefully this diagram will explain my idea.

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v5-floating-floor-construction.png

I also have some diagrams for the roof construction, and wall construction.
One other point, I am thinking that for ease of construction, it may be easier just to build a rectangular building, and build the angled walls separately (so more like a room within a room I guess). It may make things a bit easier!
Old 15th June 2014
  #4
I've had a little think (and a test on the program), and I can't get the one room approach to feel right. Having instruments in the control room doesn't seem right. I think they need their own space. The problem being that the sofa would have to be at the centre back of the room. This of course only really leaves the side of the room for any instruments. Then you have to think about the access door, and suddenly you're out of space.

I can see why it is recommended to only have one room for such a small space (due to acoustical reasons), but right now I don't really see it working. Even if you could set up temporary rooms with gobos, that still leaves them blocking the view (and more importantly, sounds) from the sofa which would be at the back of the room.

Unless, that is, I am missing something?
Old 16th June 2014
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

Hi - I really think you are over designing this and a one room studio space has been proven time and again to make more sense. By all means build an iso amp booth but for such a small space it would make SOOOOO much more sense having one decent sized well treated room rather an 4 tiny spaces that will be cramp - full of acoustic treatment and have issues with air con etc.

I think you'd designed your spaces on the principal of a large recording studio and just shrunk it down to your space. This does not work - it's much harder to build. Will cost you twice (or more) in materials and labour and will perform worse than a one room studio.

Please please rethink this.

All the best,

JP
Old 16th June 2014
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Dixon View Post
Hi - I really think you are over designing this and a one room studio space has been proven time and again to make more sense. By all means build an iso amp booth but for such a small space it would make SOOOOO much more sense having one decent sized well treated room rather an 4 tiny spaces that will be cramp - full of acoustic treatment and have issues with air con etc.

I think you'd designed your spaces on the principal of a large recording studio and just shrunk it down to your space. This does not work - it's much harder to build. Will cost you twice (or more) in materials and labour and will perform worse than a one room studio.

Please please rethink this.

All the best,

JP
I am in strong agreement with this post. Unless, which might be still possible u build it bigger, these rooms are likely going to suffer from poor sound, at least in comparison to what you could have with the larger tracking area approach. Lose the extra iso room and waiting area, just mix and track areas, separate rooms or just well isolated. You need to prioritize the space u have or make it bigger.

Wow, and posted right before Father's Day, pretty damn good gift was given I can assume? Can't just have a basketball hoop over the garage or something??? You do hope to leave home eventually, if not sooner than later, is this going to be portable? I would make it something movable or not make it, cause as cool as it might seem right now to have, at my own place would be exponentially better. I am old now, but have to say if my dad in his old age sprung for a separate studio on his property and he included a mix board, I might just move right in. My wife might have a different opinion, so thro in a grand piano and we're both livin w/ Dad. Party!!!
Old 16th June 2014
  #7
Hi JP,

Thanks for the response. I have seen many people (including professionals) post on these forums saying that for small rooms it is best not to split it up. I think you are right that I had designed it on studios with copious amounts of space. Obviously in my head it made sense to try and cram as much functionality as I could into the design. If it were not for acoustics and the way sound travels, the design wouldn't actually be too bad. I'm not worried about a cosy set-up. The trouble (as you correctly point out) is that the small size of the room does not give, particularly the low frequencies, time to develop properly.

Jazz,

Thanks also. I should note I will be paying for all of this! I have been saving up for the year and a half I have had my current (terrible) job. I wanted something good to come out of it, which is why I decided to build some place where I can relax. As for Fathers day, I'm not sure why that is relevant in this scenario! Nethertheless, I am not planning on moving out yet. Both my sisters have moved out recently, and there simply aren't the funds to do the same for me. For as long as my parents will have me here, I'll stay. There's no point in moving. In an ideal world where house prices aren't so unreachable, yes, I would make it portable...

Anyway, I guess I will have to re-think my strategy. Who knows how I'm going to have instruments in the control room work, though I'm sure I can think of something. I think gobos are the only real way forward in this scenario? If worst comes to the worst, we can get the main outside shell built first and work on the interior layout later - that's not a problem.

Thanks for the replies thus far!
Jam
Old 16th June 2014
  #8
Here for the gear
 

I'm delurking to ask...

What are you plans for insulation, heating (or cooling)? Have you thought about damp, condensation and rapid changes in temp / humidity affecting instruments etc? (things like having a place to hang wet coats, or boots so they don't evaporate into the room)

Are you in the New Forest in the UK? If so you're going to get a reasonably cold / damp winter, not too extreme but miserable enough!

A shed can make a lovely working environment ... but it is still a shed!
Old 16th June 2014
  #9
Gear Maniac
 
Kiwi Audio's Avatar
 

The "1 room control room/tracking room" can certainly be accomplished. Before I started building my current room, I was using a small 13'x14' room for everything. I established the space as my "mixing room" first, treated for acoustics, then would setup musicians in the space however it could make them fit. I would monitor with a nice pair of headphones, checking between takes on the monitors. I tracked all kinds of stuff in the small room....guitars, drums, midi, vocals, keyboards...

Just my two cents, but it can certainly be done. My advise would be to design as a mixing/writing space, since that's what you will primarily be using it for. Then move instrument in and out when you need to. Best of luck!
Old 16th June 2014
  #10
Hi Micro,
Every wall, floor and the rafters will be insulated. Preferably with Rockwool, but depends how expensive it all ends up being. As for heating and cooling, it is the one area I haven't researched yet. Mostly likely heating will be an electric radiator of some sort. Cooling is an issue though!

As for condensation, I believe we will be laying a concrete base and upon it use a damp-proof membrane somewhere under the floor joists. Not sure what else is needed to prevent damp/condensation. I plan on having an opening window in the shed (and yes I know about that being a big cause of sound leakage!). I'm leaving the rest up to my dad since he is a builder and knows what he is doing far more than I do!

Yes, we are in the New Forest, UK. So a bit of wet weather (with rain coming in form the direction of the field you can see in the picture). It can get pretty cold in winter, but also hot in summer if the weather carries on like it has the last couple weeks!

Hi Kiwi,
It's good to hear from someone who has experience of working in one room. It doesn't seem to be ideal but if there isn't really enough space you make what you can out of it! I really like the idea of making it a mixing/writing room. I will keep drawing a bit and see if I can get something that works out of the space.

Thanks once again!
Jam
Old 16th June 2014
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamming View Post
Hi JP,

Thanks for the response. I have seen many people (including professionals) post on these forums saying that for small rooms it is best not to split it up. I think you are right that I had designed it on studios with copious amounts of space. Obviously in my head it made sense to try and cram as much functionality as I could into the design. If it were not for acoustics and the way sound travels, the design wouldn't actually be too bad. I'm not worried about a cosy set-up. The trouble (as you correctly point out) is that the small size of the room does not give, particularly the low frequencies, time to develop properly.

Jazz,

Thanks also. I should note I will be paying for all of this! I have been saving up for the year and a half I have had my current (terrible) job. I wanted something good to come out of it, which is why I decided to build some place where I can relax. As for Fathers day, I'm not sure why that is relevant in this scenario! Nethertheless, I am not planning on moving out yet. Both my sisters have moved out recently, and there simply aren't the funds to do the same for me. For as long as my parents will have me here, I'll stay. There's no point in moving. In an ideal world where house prices aren't so unreachable, yes, I would make it portable...

Anyway, I guess I will have to re-think my strategy. Who knows how I'm going to have instruments in the control room work, though I'm sure I can think of something. I think gobos are the only real way forward in this scenario? If worst comes to the worst, we can get the main outside shell built first and work on the interior layout later - that's not a problem.

Thanks for the replies thus far!
Jam
I didn't mean to be funny about it, rather, thinking you might reconsider spending all the money and time in building an independent structure when eventually u will leave. Maybe u do plan on staying for the long haul, but I was thinking for this level of construction, the time invested in designing and of course building, and the fact that if u go in 2-3 yrs or less, just seems like a waste of money. Trust me I know the home costs and I rent in an almost urban area, around Boston, MA. Rent is more than most home mortgages. For me, I would't mind being with family at your age for a bit, but not long enough for me to build something like that. I would rather invest in better gear and rent a small cheap rehearsal space to do tracking work for now.

I mentioned Father's day as u mentioned your Dad in design, construction, and he obviously support the notion of u being there at an adult and additionally supports this notion of building this structure on his property. Sounded pretty relevant to me, I would think a good gift was in order for a cool pop like that! My dad would be happy to have me, but wondering why I am not wanting (not having) to save every penny into moving to the next step. Getting something setup and going would be one thing in the most cost effective and functional way, he would understand as potential avenue for the long term. But If he watched me put thousands $$ into building and of course, I assume filling with gear, he would know the logic is off base.

Anyways, best of luck with the project. I would rent something close by and have privacy a place to go away from the house and spend my money on some killin mics, pres, etc... and yes, saving to get settled into my own place and studio integration.
Old 16th June 2014
  #12
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamming View Post
Hi Micro,
Every wall, floor and the rafters will be insulated. Preferably with Rockwool, but depends how expensive it all ends up being. As for heating and cooling, it is the one area I haven't researched yet. Mostly likely heating will be an electric radiator of some sort. Cooling is an issue though!
Jam
Did you mean to day cooling is not an issue?

If so, I wouldn't be so sure. Sheds can act a bit like cars in the summer. And opening the window is not an option if you want to keep sound in (or outside sounds out).

I'm no expert but I have built a similar sized shedio. Here's some of my experiences FWIW

Mine was made with minimal materials (cheap and cheerful all the way!). I divided my shedio into a 'live room' which is about twice the footprint of a large drumkit (so more like a very large vocal booth) and a control room which is about half as big again (big enough for desk, racks, 88 key controller, v-drums and a comfy chair and tea making department in the corner).

But the divider is a semi partition with double doors (two ordinary sized internal doors with MDF glued to them for added weight). With the doors open the semi partition juts into the room about a couple of feet on each side, so it's basically like having one room when the doors are open. Even with the doors open an inch it still cuts out all hard drive/ fan noises. The benefit is that when I'm writing/ mixing the doors can stay open and I feel like I am in a (relatively) big room. Better sound for mixing too.

The construction is (from the outside in) about a half inch of larch, air gap, sterlingboard (thick compressed plywood boards), studwork filled with Kingspan insulation (about 5 inches deep), sterlingboard again, rockwool (two layers), and finally thin plywood sheets.

The roof is tin ('planwell roofing'), airgap, some spare roofing felt laid on sterlingboard, Kingspan, sterlingboard.

The control room has always been thin carpet directly onto the concrete base with a deep pile rug where I sit so I don't get cold feet. Works fine. No damp or mold.

The live room initially had chipboard on studwork and neoprene (actually cheap camping mats cut into strips!). It was free standing like a drum riser. During the first winter it went a bit mouldy underneath (I practice drums every day so it gets very humid in there). So I just took out the false floor and now have rugs and drum mats directly on the concrete floor. As a result the sound is MUCH better. Acoustic guitars and percussion sound amazing. And I can bring in or remove rugs to taste. The ceiling is now nearly 9ft which also helps a lot.

Obviously the drum kit never sounds great due to the small size (and limited supply of mics :( ) but I can get a respectable enough 'demo' sound (it was never my goal to be able to track acoustic drums properly in there, obviously).

I have NO HEATING, other than my hard drives and my poor overheating (under spec'd) mac. This is only possible because of the kingspan insulation. It's expensive but luckily I was able to mostly use offcuts.

I wouldn't dare use fan heaters or gas heaters because I have a lot of acoustic/ electric guitars and I'd worry about warping them (plus the cost of running them!). When it's really cold (below zero outside) I just wear a fleece and have a blanket wrapped around my legs (and studio slippers!) and that's good enough even when sitting for hours mixing/ writing.

I installed a rudimentary baffled air in/ air out system (two bathroom extractors and lots of plastic tubing). But I never switch them on except when practicing drums. They still draw some air out of the studio even when the fans are switched off. Otherwise I just use a standard desktop fan to 'change the air' during tea / toilet breaks. A one minute blast with the door open is all you need.

In the summer it stays lovely and cool (due to the kingspan). Otherwise it would be unbearably hot.

I've not measured the response of the room, but it sounds great. Having no brickwork helps I'm sure.

As for sound insulation..... standing outside the drum kit (maple, undampened, hit hard) sounds like a loud (but not ghetto!) car stereo playing but with the car doors and windows shut. Beyond 200 feet away you hear nothing. Luckily my nearest neighbours are half a mile away (otherwise I'd have used more rockwool).

So if I had any advice..... I guess I would think about the cost of decent insulation (like kingspan, which is not cheap) vs the cost of running a heater all winter (and any warping of guitars that might cause).

Also heating up on a sunny day is a potential problem, even in the UK! Again decent insulation is the key to staying cool.

I love my concrete floors. The live room walls and ceiling have several layers of thick cotton (heavy curtains) and a few blankets hanging on them - not very pro, I know - but in conjunction with concrete floors (with or without rugs) I can get a very clear, defined recordings but with zero room tone - perfect for Altiverb which is my live room substitute.

When I had a floating chipboard floor everything was much more muddy and boxy. Not anymore. Now it's sounding super tight, I was shocked at the difference TBH

That's all I can think of, hope it was of some use
Old 16th June 2014
  #13
Jazz,
I understand what you mean, my Dad is of course a great man and has always helped me whenever I need him. Of course I will sort him out a gift when the project is done, but our family is very modest.



Micro, what a lengthy response! Thanks so much for sitting down and writing it all out. No, I meant it as I wrote it - cooling is an issue. I was trying to emphasise how I hadn't really thought about it until now! I probably didn't word it properly.

I feel a bit guilty writing such a small response after that! Anyway, some really useful info in there, thank you. I will keep that post as a reference to come back to. I can't really see it being too cold or too hot judging by the sheer amount of insulation that will be in play. With the current shed (which has little or no insulation), the temperature does not vary too much. So with the floors, walls and roof all insulated I don't forsee any drastic changes in temperature.

I think I pretty much have the contruction side of it researched fully. I have done drawings, compared them with existing studios and they seem to match. Obviously I am not looking to achieve professional recording studio quality. However, I do want to achieve at least a minimum amount of sound reduction etc.

As I also said earlier, this outbuilding will primarily be used as a place to be creative, and to relax. I'm not looking to record other people or rent out the space, or think of it as a commercial endeavour. Just a quiet room where I can produce music, write songs, edit videos. Whilst it would be nice to have a corner to record acoustic instruments, it is not necesarry.

I'll give a little think about possible air systems, and probably see if there is a suitable DIY system I could build.
_______________________

I have tomorrow off, so I will have a think about how best to continue with the project with regards to one room or two. The case for both are obvious.

Thanks,
Jam
Old 17th June 2014
  #14
Here for the gear
 

"...No, I meant it as I wrote it - cooling is an issue.."

Ah, the '!' at the end of the sentence threw me..... I though you were having a dig at the British weather.

Looks like you (and your dad) know what you're doing (unlike me when I built mine). The only other thing I can think of is giving yourself options for expansion in the future. You say you don't particularly want to record acoustic instruments, or other people... but who knows?

I'm already planning to add on a decent sized (possibly stone walled) live room to my shedio. If you're not physically constrained by other buildings, wanting to expand is inevitable (just like gear, really)
Old 17th June 2014
  #15
It is a good idea to think about further expansion, although we would be seriously limited with the amount of space here, and obviously planning law comes into it as well. Anyway, we'll think about that if we get that far! Thanks for the advice thus far.

Jam
Old 18th June 2014
  #16
Ok, so finally after hours of head scratching and research, I have come up with what I personally think is a solid plan. I was sceptical about the one room approach - but thanks mostly to an existing control room design in New York, I have produced a workable plan. Gone are the 4 tiny rooms, now there is one dedicated space to write, record, and mix music in.

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v14-v-plan-view.png

I figured a vocal booth isn't necessary considering it probably wouldn't get used very frequently. What I have come up with is a symmetrical (well, it will be in real life!) design with two levels. The slight step up at the back would mark the relaxation area.

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v14-i.jpg

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v14-ii.jpg

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v14-iii.jpg

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v14-iv.jpg

Thank you all for your contributions, as you can see it has been really helpful!
Looking forward to hearing your feedback.

Jam.
Old 18th June 2014
  #17
Gear Maniac
 

Hi - I think it's a lot better but if you square off your 4 external corners you could keep the internal shape and just have 4 very nice large basstraps built into your design. Would save you having to do too many panels etc. Those chopped off corners is just a waste of valuable space IMHO.
Old 18th June 2014
  #18
Gear Maniac
 

..also you have no room symmetry but I sure you know that. If mixing is not your prime concern that's OK but I think, as you are building from scratch you may as well make it symmetrical.

Also the most built in tables, levels, sofas etc you have the less flexible the space becomes.

I still think you are a little guilty of scaling down a larger recording studio for your own room....

All the best..

J
Old 18th June 2014
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Dixon View Post
Hi - I think it's a lot better but if you square off your 4 external corners you could keep the internal shape and just have 4 very nice large basstraps built into your design. Would save you having to do too many panels etc. Those chopped off corners is just a waste of valuable space IMHO.
It's a good point, the trouble is the bottom left corner in the plan will have to be angled due to its proximity to another shed. I don't know where that would leave me with regards to bass traps if only one wall was angled - 3 corners would have substantial bass traps and one probably wouldn't.
Old 18th June 2014
  #20
Oops, bottom right, not bottom left. Sorry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Dixon View Post
..also you have no room symmetry but I sure you know that. If mixing is not your prime concern that's OK but I think, as you are building from scratch you may as well make it symmetrical.

Also the most built in tables, levels, sofas etc you have the less flexible the space becomes.

I still think you are a little guilty of scaling down a larger recording studio for your own room....
Well the shape will probably change slightly, and that plan was a bit rushed so there probably will be more symmetry in the final design! As for flexibility - im not too concerned to be honest. Like I said, any visits would be infrequent by anyone else, and everything as i've designed it is easily accessible. But thanks for the reminder.

I don't know, I think this design is probably less than a metre off the length of the control room I got the inspiration from. But I get your point.

Thanks,
Jam
Old 19th June 2014
  #21
Gear Addict
 
monomono's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamming View Post
(Just don't ask me what my current job is!)
I just have one question - what is your current job?

This looks set to be a great project!
Old 19th June 2014
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by monomono View Post
I just have one question - what is your current job?

This looks set to be a great project!
I'm surprised it took this long for that question!
I'm a KP at a busy country pub (so washer-upper basically) It doesn't matter what fancy name they call it, at the end of the day I just scrub burnt pans for a living. So much fun (insert sarcastic smiley).

Anyway, thanks for the interest! I can only hope the finished result will look something like my plan. So whilst I'm here, this is what I had in mind for ceiling treatment:

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v14b-i.jpg

Although that's only an initial idea, I may change it later. I assume it is best to experiment with acoustic treatment after the building is built.
Old 3rd July 2014
  #23
Gear Nut
 

Hi your last design is getting alot closer to something that make sense but the lack of symetry will really affect your mixing. I might suggest for your roof that you should maybe rotate it 90 degree and off center the crest a little towards the back. Whats the maximum dimension you need to work with I would be intersted to draw up a little sketch. What program you using to produce your pictures? Sketchup? I think your overthinking the whole thing for what you want it for. Since this short/medium term project you might not spend a whole lot for something thats mostly just for your personal enjoyement. You can probably make a more simple and effecient design for less money then what your currently looking at. Anyways hope your having fun with it and keep on learning, it shows you have been doing some homework.
Old 7th July 2014
  #24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SatelliteSP View Post
Hi your last design is getting alot closer to something that make sense but the lack of symetry will really affect your mixing. I might suggest for your roof that you should maybe rotate it 90 degree and off center the crest a little towards the back. Whats the maximum dimension you need to work with I would be intersted to draw up a little sketch.
Thank you!
Unfortunately my laptop battery charger went up in smoke hence why there haven't been any updates. I am using my PC but it does not have the files on it. The program I am using is called "Room Arranger". The unsymmetrical left walls have been changed since the last post, but I always welcome help from people like you. Nice idea with the roof, I had not thought about doing that at all.

Here is a rough diagram to show maximum external dimensions:

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-max-sketch.png

Thanks for your help so far,
Jam

Last edited by Jamming; 7th July 2014 at 04:49 PM.. Reason: Typos
Old 6th September 2014
  #25
Right, laptop is back in action which means I can finish off the planning for the "Shedio". Took a little break as work has been busy and my head has had a plan-making overload. Coming back with a fresh perspective and it occurred to me I might be able to expand just enough to make two rooms a feasible idea (albeit, just a small booth).

After checking this would be OK, I now have a bit more space to work with. Thus I have the following three plans to take into consideration. All plans are roughly drawn out with each grid square representing 1 square meter.

Two plans are fairly similar, whilst the other is a completely open plan set up, with the potential for a dividing folding door/wall, or alternatively using gobos to split up the fairly large space. I did toy with the idea of having an internal balcony above the "extension" space but that is probably overkill in all honesty. Anyway onwards with the 3 plans. Let me know which you would go for, what you would change, and what you think is just plain daft!

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v20-1.jpg

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v20-2.jpg

The Shedio - A studio... in a shed!-v20.3.jpg
Old 9th September 2014
  #26
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Farmboy presents's Avatar
Yo, Dish Pig! Looks like your plans are progressing nicely. Planning before building is essential because it just costs so much. You are lucky to have your dad as a builder because their hourly rates bite. I had to get the professionals in because they could get heaps done quite quickly compared to what I would have done, and all the studs are in the right place now. Having a one room setup is a compromise but I am doing it too, mostly because the majority of the music I will be recording is my own. And its worked out for bands in the past albeit with experts on the job and the best gear money can buy.

Thinking of money; where are you getting your materials from? Secondhand, new, a mixture? I have been astonished at how much some things cost and am trying to buy smart but I think gangsters run the supply business here.

ps. anyone who hasn't washed dishes for a living hasn't really lived.
Old 9th September 2014
  #27
Hey.
I've never heard of Dish Pig before :D Certainly is a pig of a job.
I am still unsure about the one room/two room debate. I'd prefer two, but I understand with such a "small" space it isn't really practical. Either 3 of my latest plans are feasible though, I think. And yes, I really am lucky to have my dad to help out - it'll reduce the cost so much and mean I know the end result will be spot on. I'm not really worried too much about time taken to build, as long as it is done by 6 months. Depends when we can actually start construction (which has been delayed for a couple months).

As for materials, they will be a mixture of new and second hand. Fortunately for me, there's is always wastage from jobs that my dad is on so I've been told I will be able to get some stuff that way. The rest I can buy new - I've worked hard and saved up virtually all my money, so I should be fine. It's also a good idea to visit recycling centres for things like furniture - there are always things there for free or very low cost. You'd also be surprised what people throw away in skips. Whole windows and frames that are intact.

So for a month or so this thread will remain in the planning phase, but better now than after it is built!
Old 9th September 2014
  #28
Gear Nut
 

I would think if you are to use the extra space you now have you would go for a 2 room design. The odd shape might be a problem for room symmetry in a one room design.

The first one seems intersteting

Sorry never got around to do a draft as I suggested was too busy.
Old 9th September 2014
  #29
Gear Maniac
 

Hi - I'd go for plan 3 - but why the odd shape?

Non of your plans take into account the thickness of the walls - i.e. they are currently the thickness of your pencil! In practice they could be about 35cm thick minimum - that eats up a lot of internal space....
Old 9th September 2014
  #30
Thank you for your comments!
The reason for the weird shape is partly because of site restrictions. It's an awkward site, and I want to make the most of it.
I have since got one more design to throw into the mix which is similar(ish) to the 1st design but there are a couple differences.
The walls are all about 21cm thick - which was what I calculated a staggered stud wall + 2 sheets of plasterboard would be. I might check this again before I get much further.
I do think having it as one room would cause some odd acoustics - more akin to a live room. However, like I said, I could easily build gobos if they would solve such issues.

I'm still very much open to ideas, since we haven't even got to the foundation stage yet!
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