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I’m having trouble justifying College to myself
Old 22nd August 2018
  #61
Lives for gear
the lady doth protest too much, i think ...
Old 23rd August 2018
  #62
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derp View Post
I never say this to people because most of the time it's mean and wrong to make fun of something that can be a very difficult struggle for people with mental problems, but you need to TAKE YOUR MEDS. Stat.

EDIT - Nevermind, I thought you were BitSmith again trying to say that I brought it up because I capitalized the "H" and he didn't hahahaha Maybe not meds, but some reading glasses for me haha
Old 23rd August 2018
  #63
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Derp's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by psykostx View Post
I never say this to people because most of the time it's mean and wrong to make fun of something that can be a very difficult struggle for people with mental problems, but you need to TAKE YOUR MEDS. Stat.

EDIT - Nevermind, I thought you were BitSmith again trying to say that I brought it up because I capitalized the "H" and he didn't hahahaha Maybe not meds, but some reading glasses for me haha
LOL! Yeah sorry, but Godwin's Law has been invoked, so it needs to be pointed out.
Old 23rd August 2018
  #64
Deleted 2915a84
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitsmith View Post
WELL at the risk of getting off topic here - honestly it sounds like a bit of right wing bias you've got going there ... each country uses it's tax pool for 'the common good' - whatever voters might deem that to be .. for example a police and fire service ... medical care ... national defence (where needed) ... I grew up in canada where taxation of 40-50% isn't uncommon but honestly without such services (look at medical care or security) one could be paying much more than that ... many countries have 'free' universities where there's really only the cost of living to pay for. Western Europe. Russia ... lots of other places. It really all just boils down to what the community thinks is important enough to pay for from the collective fund ...
The common good?

You’ve gotta be kidding me.

How old are you?

Taxes take resources from innovators and give them to paper shufflers to dole out for political purposes.

Rich people don’t pay taxes. Middle
Class people do (the bourgeoisie).
Old 23rd August 2018
  #65
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ponzi's Avatar
I know a 29 year old who took a two year computer vocational degree and is making $106,000 a year now... As to college, I think its really important to understand how much a 4 year degree will cost and what benefits will derive thereof. I know there are some statistics stating college grads make 2.x more or whatever--at the very least this sort of study relies on the logical fallacy of correlation equals causation.

My view is that a college degree is necessary in a STEM career, liberal arts degrees should be examined carefully with an eye to what career they lead to--and whether one wants to acquire 1-2 hundred dollars of debt to get there. I am a huge fan of vocational education, and I think college is over-priced and its benefits over-estimated with the above mentioned career path. Also, a stem degree requires a lot of work and smarts, so if one is not very motivated, just gonna wash out.

There are lots of large companies that require a college degree, whether related or not, though I think this is diminishing. Lots of good jobs available at companies that don't set an arbitrary hurdle. I am aware of one college graduate at a company I worked at who was determined to be unable to read, so I wonder how much comfort employers should get from freshly printed sheepskin...
Old 23rd August 2018
  #66
Deleted 2915a84
Guest
“The bourgeoisie [middle class] , wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his 'natural superiors,”

“...and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, callous 'cash payment.' It has drowned the most heavenly ecstasies of religious fervor, of chivalrous enthusiasm, of philistine sentimentalism, in the icy water of egotistical calculation.”

Marx makes his preference for CASTE FASCISM clear.

This is what Hitler understood.


Every truly national idea is in the last resort social, i.e., he who is prepared so completely to adopt the cause of his people that he really knows no higher ideal than the prosperity of this - his own - people, he who has so taken to heart the meaning of our great song 'Deutschland, Deutschland uber alles,' that nothing in this world stands for him higher than this Germany, people and land, land and people, he is a Socialist!

And he who in this people sympathizes with the poorest of its citizens, who in this people sees in every individual a valuable member of the whole community, and who recognizes that this community can flourish only when it is formed not of rulers and oppressed but when all according to their capacities fulfill their duty to their Fatherland and the community of the people and are valued accordingly, he who seeks to preserve the native vigor, the strength, and the youthful energy of the millions of working men, and who above all is concerned that our precious possession, our youth, should not before its time be used up in unhealthy harmful work - he is not merely a Socialist, but he is also National in the highest sense of that word.”
Old 24th August 2018
  #67
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Derp's Avatar
Looks like somebody didn't realize Godwin's Law is a joke. Just because His holy name has been invoked doesn't mean we have to discuss Him.
Old 24th August 2018
  #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guyacier View Post
The common good?

You’ve gotta be kidding me.

How old are you?

Taxes take resources from innovators and give them to paper shufflers to dole out for political purposes.

Rich people don’t pay taxes. Middle
Class people do (the bourgeoisie).


again ... i think your comment is context dependent (true in america mostly exclusively) so i bet you're american. I'm 52 - how old are you?

but yes ... i'll say it again 'the common good' - i provided examples. but of course there are LOTS of examples of corrupt systems like in the US and eastern european countries etc where exploitation happens ... my eyes are not closed to that ...
Old 24th August 2018
  #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxman12 View Post
My goal when I graduated from high school was to play in a symphony orchestra. I was ready to audition and was told by my teacher that I would be able to win the audition within 6 months. But I was married and had several children.
You were married and had several children when you graduated from high school?
Old 24th August 2018
  #70
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jaxman12's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yummerz View Post
You were married and had several children when you graduated from high school?
No, After I graduated from High School I got married. I was 18 when we got married. Children came along about 4 years later. My goal was always to play in a Symphony since I was in High School. Was still working a full time job and practicing every day. Played in community orchestras. Was within 6 months of being ready and able to win an audition. But had to make a decision between poverty and a symphony position, or a better life that paid the bills and an income that supported a family.
Old 30th August 2018
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PB+J View Post
I’m a college professor. I teach history. I’m sure lots of people here think history is a bunch of useless BS.

Do not go to college if you are not self motivated to do the work.

Knowing history, literature, art is valuable in and of itself. Listening to music, just listening because you like it, doesn’t pay you anything. But it’s valuable in and of itself.

The skills acquired in a liberal arts are useful in virtually any field. At the moment everyone is pushing STEM degrees. Watch as the overproduction of stem degrees leads to unemployment.

I’m not saying don’t undertake a STEM major: just don’t expect a magic bullet. Liberal arts majors, unless they are lazy and indifferent, learn a wide range of skills including writing, editing, logical thinking, marshaling evidence, and the capacity to think synthetically across different fields of knowledge. These things remain valuable. Most of the people. Know why graduated with technical degrees have wound up doing things much closer to the liberal arts, while the technical stuff is done by kids out of college. That is, they write, edit, critique, analyze, strategize, manage. That’s a normal career arc in the professions. But it doesn’t sound like you are drawn in the direction of the liberal arts.

If you aren’t intrinsically motivated then you are probably wasting your time in any case. Trying to guess which technical field will guarantee you a job is dubious: fields change very quickly. If you aren’t intrinsically motivated you will be a mediocre engineer, computer programmer, nurse, accountant etc.

And of course there’s no reason everyone should go to college.

I’m very sympathetic. It’s tough to be young and facing uncertainty. Good luck to you
I used to be a college professor. A good, long while ago.

Got probably the best liberal arts education this country had to offer, too.

I agree with the idea that such an education prepares you most effectively to not only deal with the complexities of the world, and life, but sets you up for a lifetime of self-enriching study and attention to learning about things in ways that really can't just be picked up from Youtube and Wikipedia. The depth, the immersion in the experience you can have of art, literature, history, and all other disciplines as a result of your training in college on _how to learn_, above all, your ability to extend that post-college to even including appreciation and understanding of all the sciences, gives you a kind of life no-one who trains to be a mere temporary tool for capitalism will ever have.

BUT: and this is related to my previous comment. For me, this all happened at a time when it was truly affordable for people who were, at the time, middle class (a class that has pretty much disappeared in the US), and when civilization here wasn't so technologically instrumentalist in nature that all it is willing to support are those temporary tools needed for business profit.

Times are different; the education I had is hugely out of reach of most people now, and comes with a burden of debt slavery that will guarantee a life of indentured servitude to corporations every bit as bad, and extensive, as it was in the 18th and 19th centuries. While corporations don't (yet) whip and brutalize people in the US the way they did during the years of openly embraced slavery, there is still plenty of brutalization -- mental and spiritual, more than physical -- going on across the board, even and especially at the FAANG corporations.

So I wouldn't wish that upon anyone, no matter the benefits. Make the world your book, instead, and don't get punched into a tiny little card-table corner of it, stuck in front of a computer ruining your eyes.
Old 30th August 2018
  #72
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadAnimemes View Post
I’m 19 going on 20, I’ve been through one semester of college as an open major, taking audio engineering courses and gen-eds.
I have no idea why one would study audio engineering in college. Is some big name engineer teaching there? It's been my experience that the mediocrities of the world tend to teach these sorts of courses unless you're going to Berklee or another similar very high quality music school. And, you'd be crazy to pay private school prices for any of this anyway even if you were going to Berklee unless you came from a family with the money to afford it all.

Quote:
I have 20 credits of gen-eds from high school.
So we know you are at least above average in intelligence to pretty damn smart.

Quote:
Long story short, I didn’t enjoy it and am questioning going back. I don’t want a career in music specifically, just want to do audio for a living. Live events, broadcast, television, recording, whatever. I just love audio. I feel like I’m waisitng my time waiting around at College for another 3-4 years when I could just put myself to work. But even if I do Nail The Mix classes, find an apprenticeship I can work at for little or free, and work a management job to help fund all of it, my parents still think it’s a bad decision not to go to school at the same time.
Maybe you should take a break to see if your audio career can gain any traction. But, if you don't make decent money within X amount of time (say two years) then back to college. But, please do yourself a favor and don't take any more audio courses.

Quote:
What are your expiriences with school? Is the debt worth it for someone who wants to work in entertainment?
I think your first college degree (hopefully a bachelor degree) should focus on something that comes very easy for you. Go with your strengths. Stay away from private colleges and their extremely high costs unless you are going to a top five university or come from a family with the finances to pay for it without incurring debt. Stay away from student loans. Student loans are really only for persons who are in professional school and will earn an assured income after college such as dentists or physicians. Small student loans (say $5K to $10K per year are a good way for undergrads whose parents are paying for things to allow the parents to spread the costs across several months versus being hit for chunks of money in a way that hurts the family's cashflow.

When you ask is the debt worth it get out a calculator. There's a sort of voodoo in making business decisions: Decision Trees for Decision Making

But, I've been in meetings where a Ph.D. economist (graduated from Chicago) pulled out a calculator and just ran through scenarios to see if they were financially viable.
Old 30th August 2018
  #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psykostx View Post
If you don't have a career in mind that requires specific training or a Masters or Doctorate, do not get a Bachelor's degree. Aside from being incredibly expensive, it becomes even more expensive when your degree does little more than put you at the front of the line for positions that don't require a degree and pay hourly wages, not salary. A bachelor's degree means absolutely nothing to employers these days, unless it's very specific and a step towards a particular master's degree or doctorate.
To say that as some sweeping fact is incorrect. WHAT YOUR MAJOR IS MATTERS - A LOT. Getting a bachelor's in liberal arts (aka basket weaving) is hardly the same as getting one in accounting or computer science or engineering, etc.

The academic landscape has changed and continues to change dramatically, and college costs are enormous, giving good reason to question that path, but IMO it's foolish to discount the benefit of one outright. Do the research, have an idea what career path you're interested in, weigh the pros and cons of other options, etc.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
A bachelor's degree means, at the very least, the the degree-holder had the patience, perseverance, commitment, and dedication to see a large "project" [sic] through to completion.

Given two all-other-things-equal job candidates, any employer is going to look more favorably upon the degree holder for that reason.
....and I'd say that occurs in about, oh, .000001% of all job placements (tops). Unfortunately.

In most cases, employers don't give a flip that you have a degree in and of itself. What's the degree in, what's your GPA, do you have any experience, any other qualifications...THOSE are the things that get people interviews most of the time; not just "I have a degree."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derp View Post
Also, there is the experience and education that comes with a degree.
A degree = education, not experience. At least no employer out there counts that as "experience."


Quote:
Originally Posted by johnd5412 View Post
Getting an education is often mistakenly viewed as a means to an end. However, lets not forget about the journey. It should make you a better critical thinker and problem identifier/solver. If it doesn't, then you are not getting the right education.
Sorry but that is more pie in the sky fluffy wishful thinking and totally incorrect. The primary reason for a degree is to significantly bolster your job/career opportunities. Unless perhaps your parents are silly rich and you have the luxury of such lofty goals without having to worry about oh btw I need to be able to make a living.


Quote:
Originally Posted by conleec View Post
There are intangible benefits to attending school at that age: primarily critical thinking skills, patience, and perhaps most importantly, it just opens your mind to alternate points of view
LOL

Haven't been around colleges in recent years I take it? College profs are about as open-minded as Hitler these days.
Old 30th August 2018
  #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 2915a84 View Post
Rich people don’t pay taxes.
LOL

On what planet?
Old 30th August 2018
  #75
Gear Guru
 
Derp's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
A degree = education, not experience. At least no employer out there counts that as "experience."
I can't speak for all employers obviously, but my employer doesn't care what you major in to get into upper management, just that you have one. There is where experience counts for them in that what they're seeing in a college grad is someone that buckled down and did their school work without having direct supervision. College projects often require thinking outside of the box, so they figure if you have a degree, you had to do at least some thinking on your own.
Old 30th August 2018
  #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derp View Post
I can't speak for all employers obviously, but my employer doesn't care what you major in to get into upper management, just that you have one. There is where experience counts for them in that what they're seeing in a college grad is someone that buckled down and did their school work without having direct supervision. College projects often require thinking outside of the box, so they figure if you have a degree, you had to do at least some thinking on your own.
Sure. But that still isn't "experience" in the job/career sense. If your employer calls that "experience," they're in an extremely tiny minority. When employers say "experience" in a job posting, they mean job experience, not a degree. Experience and education are always (or extremely close to it) considered two distinct and separate things, that's all I mean.
Old 30th August 2018
  #77
Gear Guru
 
Derp's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
Sure. But that still isn't "experience" in the job/career sense. If your employer calls that "experience," they're in an extremely tiny minority. When employers say "experience" in a job posting, they mean job experience, not a degree. Experience and education are always (or extremely close to it) considered two distinct and separate things, that's all I mean.
Yeah, the employer didn't call it experience, I did.

LOL SEMANTICS!!!
Old 1st September 2018
  #78
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derp View Post
I can't speak for all employers obviously, but my employer doesn't care what you major in to get into upper management, just that you have one. There is where experience counts for them in that what they're seeing in a college grad is someone that buckled down and did their school work without having direct supervision. College projects often require thinking outside of the box, so they figure if you have a degree, you had to do at least some thinking on your own.
I don't know if it's so much 'thinking on one's own' so much as you know that an ex university grad is going to have a fairly standarized experience and you know they will be on the same page as you compared to, let's say a community college student or something
Old 1st September 2018
  #79
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ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
...Haven't been around colleges in recent years I take it? College profs are about as open-minded as Hitler these days.
I had resisted speaking to this point, but since you broke the ice on the subject, from what I am seeing in the news as well as what was reported from my son in college, the undergrad college experience seems to be all about teaching followership and intolerance of the ideas of others.

The standard stated benefit of a 'liberal education' is all about learning how to think for one's self, learning problem solving skills, learning to understand other perspectives, preparing to embark on a lifetime course of learning. I think the theory here has merit, and no doubt in some colleges this actually occurs. (I think a couple of professors articulated this concept quite well in earlier posts).

What I do see a lot of now, and frankly from studying American history its the culmination of a trend, is that in fact the college student is taught not how to think, but rather what to think, and this is universally a fairly narrow and rigid set of cultural and political beliefs. There is even, at this sad point in our history, an openly stated objection to the free exchange of ideas, which at one point was considered foundation to the notion of a 'liberal education'. Also, the ideological hostility to capitalism, and in particular for-profit corporations, I have to wonder to what extent the recently minted college graduate who has internalized this world view can give their employers indigestion.

I also think the theory of the 'liberal education' is kind of a distractor from the important question (to the student, not the college), of the idea that they are spending many times more than in decades past with a reasonable goal of also being able to secure gainful employment at a high enough salary level to both pay off their student loans as well as attain the material components of the American Dream: A house, a car, a job that is emotionally and financially rewarding, the ability to support a family in a safe neighborhood.

I think the notion of a 'liberal education' that is directed at creating the well rounded man (its from the 19th century) has a strong aristocratic component--that a true Gentleman need not dirty their hands grubbing for the filthy mammon. So, at its core, the 'liberal education' is almost intentionally not directed at securing employment, as an aristocrat has no need to do so.

Well, for those who made it this far, I hope you enjoyed reading this as much as I enjoyed writing it. I continue to be a very strong advocate for vocational education--an investment in one's economic future. I think there is both an institutional jealousy and a snobbishness to the notion that a vocational education leaves its student somehow lacking in the enlightened perspective that a 'liberal education' can impart. I wonder if a truly liberal education (in the 19th century meaning of the phrase) is even available t the average college student today.

Last edited by ponzi; 2nd September 2018 at 04:09 PM..
Old 1st September 2018
  #80
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You're spitting into the wind, but bravo all the same.
Old 1st September 2018
  #81
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ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
You're spitting into the wind, but bravo all the same.
Just showing off, I suppose...
Old 2nd September 2018
  #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realtrance View Post
I used to be a college professor. A good, long while ago.

Got probably the best liberal arts education this country had to offer, too.

I agree with the idea that such an education prepares you most effectively to not only deal with the complexities of the world, and life, but sets you up for a lifetime of self-enriching study and attention to learning about things in ways that really can't just be picked up from Youtube and Wikipedia. The depth, the immersion in the experience you can have of art, literature, history, and all other disciplines as a result of your training in college on _how to learn_, above all, your ability to extend that post-college to even including appreciation and understanding of all the sciences, gives you a kind of life no-one who trains to be a mere temporary tool for capitalism will ever have.

BUT: and this is related to my previous comment. For me, this all happened at a time when it was truly affordable for people who were, at the time, middle class (a class that has pretty much disappeared in the US), and when civilization here wasn't so technologically instrumentalist in nature that all it is willing to support are those temporary tools needed for business profit.

Times are different; the education I had is hugely out of reach of most people now, and comes with a burden of debt slavery that will guarantee a life of indentured servitude to corporations every bit as bad, and extensive, as it was in the 18th and 19th centuries. While corporations don't (yet) whip and brutalize people in the US the way they did during the years of openly embraced slavery, there is still plenty of brutalization -- mental and spiritual, more than physical -- going on across the board, even and especially at the FAANG corporations.

So I wouldn't wish that upon anyone, no matter the benefits. Make the world your book, instead, and don't get punched into a tiny little card-table corner of it, stuck in front of a computer ruining your eyes.
Where did you get your liberal arts education?
Old 2nd September 2018
  #83
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
To say that as some sweeping fact is incorrect. WHAT YOUR MAJOR IS MATTERS - A LOT. Getting a bachelor's in liberal arts (aka basket weaving) is hardly the same as getting one in accounting or computer science or engineering, etc.

The academic landscape has changed and continues to change dramatically, and college costs are enormous, giving good reason to question that path, but IMO it's foolish to discount the benefit of one outright. Do the research, have an idea what career path you're interested in, weigh the pros and cons of other options, etc.
I agree, that's why I said "if you don't have a particular [career] or [degree path] in mind. Did you read beyond the first sentence of my post?
Old 2nd September 2018
  #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PB+J View Post
Do not go to college if you are not self motivated to do the work.
You'd think that's stating the obvious, but I have to wonder how many thousands - make that millions - of dollars and man-hours were wasted because both kids and parents didn't make an honest assessment in that regard and act accordingly.

Quote:
Knowing history, literature, art is valuable in and of itself. Listening to music, just listening because you like it, doesn’t pay you anything. But it’s valuable in and of itself.
Yes, absolutely; it is from an enrich-your-mind perspective. But it rarely is from a get a job/making a living perspective, unfortunately.

Quote:
The skills acquired in a liberal arts are useful in virtually any field.
Yes, but one can - in fact usually has to - take a certain degree of liberal arts-type courses for most any degree, including technical ones, so that's not a case for a liberal arts degree. And I'm sorry but a liberal arts degree is like a kickstand on tank in terms of building a career. It's like screaming "I don't know what I want to do with my life." And companies aren't looking for that. They want people with specific knowledge/skills.

Quote:
At the moment everyone is pushing STEM degrees. Watch as the overproduction of stem degrees leads to unemployment.
You'll be watching an awfully long time, because that isn't happening any time soon. The most in-demand jobs are STEM related (granted that varies on how broadly you define "STEM," e.g. most healthcare-related jobs are technical as well). People with technical degrees remain in high demand. People with liberal arts degrees remain essentially not in demand at all. I'm not saying that's good or bad, it's simply reality.

Quote:
Most of the people. Know why graduated with technical degrees have wound up doing things much closer to the liberal arts,
If this means "most of the people you know," believe me, that's a very unique outlier. If anything, it's usually the opposite; people with liberal arts degrees end up having to get a degree or some other training in something specific to make a living. Good luck finding jobs out there which post "liberal arts degree" as a requirement or even desired. Most by far are looking for very specific skills and education (not all "STEM" but again the bulk of the most in-demand ones are).

Quote:
Trying to guess which technical field will guarantee you a job is dubious: fields change very quickly.
Not sure what you mean by "fields change" - the tech within them does, but the jobs and fields themselves, i.e. the nature of the jobs etc hasn't much, generally speaking.

Quote:
And of course there’s no reason everyone should go to college.
Quite true. It's a radically changing landscape IMO. Between the soaring costs and many companies/fields getting less picky about requiring degrees vs some job-specific certification, I predict college enrollment will continue to spiral downward in the coming years. It's a scary outlook.
Old 2nd September 2018
  #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psykostx View Post
I agree, that's why I said "if you don't have a particular [career] or [degree path] in mind. Did you read beyond the first sentence of my post?
Yes. Did you miss how I was agreeing with you?
Old 2nd September 2018
  #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
Yes. Did you miss how I was agreeing with you?
Saying that my statements were akin to sweeping generalizations and thus incorrect, directly after quoting them does not communicate agreement. Even if the following information parallels in some way, the opening remark sets a tone of corrective reconstruction and editorial criticism, not of harmonious urgency and further clarification. So no I didn't miss that you were agreeing, I was under the impression that you did haha
Old 2nd September 2018
  #87
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Temple of Light's Avatar
 

The choice is simply whether or not you are going to spend your life thinking in the box, and trying to get out,
vs thinking outside the box and throwing the box away, while being happy with yourself as you finally realize you didn't
need the box to begin with.
Bill Gates is a college dropout and a master criminal, rewarding him billions.
The same could be said for Trump.
Understand what motivates you and prioritize that according to your intelligence.
Not matter what you do, someone is going to hack and troll you until you die.

YYMV

Light

Temple
Old 2nd September 2018
  #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psykostx View Post
Saying that my statements were akin to sweeping generalizations and thus incorrect, directly after quoting them does not communicate agreement. Even if the following information parallels in some way, the opening remark sets a tone of corrective reconstruction and editorial criticism, not of harmonious urgency and further clarification. So no I didn't miss that you were agreeing, I was under the impression that you did haha
My bad, got my posts mixed up (never read/answer posts in a hurry).

You said: "If you don't have a career in mind that requires specific training or a Masters or Doctorate, do not get a Bachelor's degree."

"specific training" is too vague to really agree or disagree with; virtually all jobs, regardless of educational or any other requirements, will ultimately require "specific training." So that in itself says nothing about the logic of getting or not getting a Bachelors.

That aside, if the focus is on only a Bachelors not being enough, that is certainly incorrect. My point was there are many careers for which where no more than a Bachelors is required to go far.
Old 3rd September 2018
  #89
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BarcelonaMusic's Avatar
 

Trades. That`s where the money is. I work at a college, and I could not if I did not have a degree. Gravy job, only work maybe 10 months a year at most and super laid back, free insurance, matching 7%/7% retirement I just got lucky. People stay at these jobs for 50 years plus. I`ve had a trade license for almost 20 years that pays about $75 an hour of work. I`ve made over $1.200 in A DAY before. I`m just kinda comfortable and lazy and enjoy my free time. But trades are where the money is. If I were younger I would start as a plumbers apprentice. Holy crap, even Journeymen make a LOT of money. Master plumber, you don`t do anything except watch the cash roll in.
Old 4th September 2018
  #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yummerz View Post
Where did you get your liberal arts education?
'Murica.
Topic:
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