The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Why do people bash FL Studio?
Old 9th February 2017
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Why do people bash FL Studio?

Ello, guys. So, I've been talking with some friends as of late, and we managed to end up discussing which DAWs we've used. We all make metalcore/rock music, and yet we use vastly different software. One of us uses Pro Tools, one uses Cubase, and I use FL Studio. I'm curious as to why they (and many others) seem to bash FL Studio. It's a decent DAW, and despite what people say, it works quite nicely for metalcore and rock. The EQ is simple, it comes with many plugins right out of the box (out of the .EXE?), and the piano roll is pure bliss. Left click to add a note. Right click to remove it. Click and hold to drag and/or resize. Double click to edit note properties. There is no switching of tools or keyboard commands necessary to edit midi patterns. I've also seen people say that FL's pattern-based midi editing is "showing its age". What exactly is wrong with being able to click a pattern and click a blank space to copy that pattern? Or being able to visually identify the pattern in a playlist for editing and copy/paste purposes? It doesn't make sense to me that musicians and engineers want the more complicated, painful way of doing things as opposed to the ease of FL.

Any insight?
Old 9th February 2017
  #2
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
FL studio is great for alot of different styles of music especially edm, r&b and trap music. I use cubase bc I like the way that you can easily apply time signature changes. Doing this in FL Studio is a bit cumbersome imo which is why I use cubase. But other than that FL Studio is a great daw. So many hits nowadays have been created with it. I can tell when a track is using FL Studio most of the time by listening to its sequence. All daw's nowadays are more than capable of delivering the goods but if trap music is your goal then FL Studio is very difficult to beat imo. But for composing on a more elaborate composition such as scoring I would go with cubase all the way! YMMV
Old 17th May 2017
  #3
FL is king at what it does. But many ppl don't seem to gel with its workflow. It's unbeatable for pattern based music creation, the piano roll is amazing - no other DAW has nailed that part better - but it wouldn't be my 1st choice for live instrument recording and editing. So as long as as your music heavily relies on vsti, nothing comes close to FL. For hardware instrument recording...I prefer a more traditional multitracker and a dedicated editing system.
Old 27th May 2017
  #4
Here for the gear
 
skench_official's Avatar
 

Here are three reasons that I could think of from the top of my head

1. it's easy to pirate so many young producers who are just starting out use it to make pretty poor sounding music

2. it used to be called Fruity Loops which some people might find ridiculous

3. the earlier versions of the software did not have many features
Old 14th June 2017
  #5
It works for me.
Old 19th June 2017
  #6
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulRippreATTR View Post
I'm curious as to why they (and many others) seem to bash FL Studio.

Any insight?
Ignorance?

I'm not a user really, but I researched it when I was looking into DAWs. It initially was limited but from what I can tell has changed/grown a lot in recent years. That appears to be the clue they're missing.
Old 19th June 2017
  #7
Lives for gear
 
12tone's Avatar
 

A) It wasn't named Cocoa Puffs.

B) It wasn't named Lucky Charms

C) it wasn't named Raisin Bran

D) It wasn't named Frosted Flakes
Old 20th June 2017
  #8
Lives for gear
 

The developer (Gol is he still developing it, he seems to have gone quiet this last, as has FLS) was a complete and total a-hole, constantly saying things were not needed when they were, then totally forgetting all the other software and developers he had insulted when he finally bothered to integrate things.
It got tiresome for me personally so i moved on.
Old 20th June 2017
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungle View Post
The developer (Gol is he still developing it, he seems to have gone quiet this last, as has FLS) was a complete and total a-hole, constantly saying things were not needed when they were, then totally forgetting all the other software and developers he had insulted when he finally bothered to integrate things.
It got tiresome for me personally so i moved on.
You used to work for Image Line?
Old 24th June 2017
  #10
Here for the gear
I've been using it for years now. I make all types of music ranging from orchestral to pop. Back in the day when it was 'Fruity Loops' I was told the exporting algorithms weren't clear and made the mix sound muddy. A lot of labels wouldn't give my work a second glance after finding out about the DAW. I would say it was my inexperience with the mixdown, not the DAW itself but who knows. They didn't have the best reputation to begin with thus is why it isn't as popular today... well especially with the older folk
They have come a long way now and I wouldn't change it for anything.
Old 30th June 2017
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
Ignorance?

I'm not a user really, but I researched it when I was looking into DAWs. It initially was limited but from what I can tell has changed/grown a lot in recent years. That appears to be the clue they're missing.
Its fully featured at this point in time. I started on version 3.something and back then it didn't have a mixer with faders. It had 16 "FX slots". It now has a mixer where you can route any output to any input except to the same channel. You can't do feedback loops without the help of third party plugins, probably as a safety precaution. If you wanted to do this you can use something like Senderella.

As a long time FL Studio user, I would say its development has been ad hoc. The ability to route any channel anywhere, the ability to time stretch audio and edit wave files was all bolted onto a programme that never had these things to begin with and may seem counter intuitive to some people. for example, wave editing with Edison is weird. You have waterfall graphs and all these high level features but the Y axis doesn't show decibels and precision editing is clumsy. You also do it via a plugin loaded on a mixer channel.

Stuff like the sidechain index is super ad hoc. The difference between a "send" channel and an "insert" channel has been completely phased out. As of version 12, any channel can be a send or a bus. Any channel can be a serial or parallel signal path. You can pipe out the signal from any plugin in the signal chain and route it directly to the main or auxiliary input of any other plugin. You sometimes run into weird problems when creating channels like the old send tracks or loading an old .flp project in FL Studio 12.

In an old project where the send tracks were pre-wired, they had inputs from every insert track with the aux send level set to zero by default. These inputs, specifically the channel numbers are reflected in the sidechain index so if you want to route an output directly into a VST plugin input on a send track, then alt + arrow to move your output channels around, it breaks the index numbers.

FL Studio is in a strange place. On the one hand it does certain things that no other DAW can do. Its piano roll is a thing of beauty and working with it is unbelievably fast. On the other hand, it has alot of idiosyncrasies which you have to learn and some of them are not straight forward. In the case of sidechain index, to understand why it behaves the way it does, you really have to know what FL Studio's mixer was like in the past. In a strange way, it is both friendly and hostile to newbies.

I still think it deserves its own sub forum though. At this point I'm used to its weirdness and I can't really use anything else.

Regarding Gol. Hes just gruff. The flp forums have people like Scott and Fidelity doing most of the user interaction now and they can deal with people alot better. I don't hold this against Gol - he is a genius imo but isn't good at talking to people. He is like Jeurgen from Jomox who is a real life electronics superhero but over email he can sound very direct, sometimes even rude. He isn't a rude guy at all, he just comes off that way in text. I don't pay it any mind.
Old 5th July 2017
  #12
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by roaringwave View Post
FL studio is great for alot of different styles of music especially edm, r&b and trap music. I use cubase bc I like the way that you can easily apply time signature changes. Doing this in FL Studio is a bit cumbersome imo which is why I use cubase. But other than that FL Studio is a great daw. So many hits nowadays have been created with it. I can tell when a track is using FL Studio most of the time by listening to its sequence. All daw's nowadays are more than capable of delivering the goods but if trap music is your goal then FL Studio is very difficult to beat imo. But for composing on a more elaborate composition such as scoring I would go with cubase all the way! YMMV
thats pretty wild. how can you tell its fl studio from the sequence? I need to learn how to change that so I dont sound like an FL studio producer lol
any tips?
Old 11th July 2017
  #13
Lives for gear
 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
I've been using FL since 2 in a lot of ways as I grew it grew with me. BUT once I started dealing with outboard synths and midi - SIGH. FL Studio needs a lot of 'clicks' to make this stuff work properly. It's also not great with Reaktor/Kontakt, but not actually bad.

I think at this point you can do any kind of work with FL Studio, but you need to read the guides etc and ask q's on the forum, which is quite active, thankfully.
Also to note, it's EXTREMELY compatible with VST plugs. I am constantly seeing this or that plug doesn't work in this or that DAW but rarely does it not work in FL.

Very easy to think it's a 'bro' kind of DAW but I've seen people showing incredible orchestration automation stuff via Kontakt and VSL, FL Studio has a lot of interesting powerful stuff like flowstone (iirc the name) and INTERNALLY it can pretty much automate anything connected to pretty much anything. But it really struggles with external gear. It doesn't even natively assign pitch bend or modulation wheel from external keyboards :/
Old 18th July 2017
  #14
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
I been sequencing ever since midi/daws were created. What makes an Fl Studio track noticeable is the heavy use of it's note splice feature. This feature along with detuning/pan make it easy to tell what saw that the producer is using. Granted, other daws have these similar features but, fl timing is easy to pick up on and simple to use. Where as in other daws this feature isn't as simple to implement. Also other things about fl studio producers that makes it quite obvious that they are using it as there Saw of choice is: #1 very little use of time signature/tempo changes. That is very awkward to do in fl studio. Can be done though if you understand how to count the number of beats/bars in the pattern mode then chain them in the song mode. I use Cubase because I compose music with many time signature/tempo changes. I don't really like to compose at a constant tempo/time signature, I have a tendency to get bored after the first verse/chorus. I like my compositions to move like a live band does. All the best!!!
Old 20th July 2017
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Seccione's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtROBOT View Post
I've been using FL since 2 in a lot of ways as I grew it grew with me. BUT once I started dealing with outboard synths and midi - SIGH. FL Studio needs a lot of 'clicks' to make this stuff work properly
Not sure what kind of problems you have with FL and outboard synths, but I solved most of my problems by making this VST plugin for controlling my synthesizers:

https://www.kvraudio.com/product/sel...vague-software



Just released it on KVR for free. (Been using that for few years by my self )
Old 20th July 2017
  #16
Lives for gear
 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seccione View Post
Not sure what kind of problems you have with FL and outboard synths, but I solved most of my problems by making this VST plugin for controlling my synthesizers:

https://www.kvraudio.com/product/sel...vague-software



Just released it on KVR for free. (Been using that for few years by my self )
Cooool thanks for that
Old 23rd July 2017
  #17
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
Fl Studio's fingerprints is a giveaway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by varun213 View Post
thats pretty wild. how can you tell its fl studio from the sequence? I need to learn how to change that so I dont sound like an FL studio producer lol
any tips?
Fl Studio has sequencer fingerprints that 99% of the time is quite easy to detect based upon the genre of music that it is calibrated\used for. The 'note splicer' is the most noticeable fingerprint. It's precision and timing along with it's panning and tuning editing let's you know that fl studio's sequencer is being used.

Although many other DAWs have similar features. Fl Studio's feature is very simple to use and manipulate when it comes to that. It's faster and more intuitive specifically in that department where it is quite heavily used. Like I said before, I like Fl Studio. But, I can not use it for every genre of music. Especially when it comes to composing with time signature changes and recording live analog. I find it not so good in that department. In Cubase, this is a breeze to do. But if you write music with no Time signature changes/Tempo changes then Fl Studio may be just for you. But to me, I find music without that to be quite static. I have tendency to get bored with static tempos and timing arrangements.

Lastly, the piano roll in fl studio is sweet but, it is simple no match to Cubase's piano roll imo. The only good part in Fl's piano roll is the note splice feature. Other than that it is quite basic when it comes to midi editing compared to Cubase. Fl studio is the best Trap Daw/EDM out. It's in its own lane in those genres. Although trap and edm can be made on just about any daw, fl seems to get to the finishing line alot quicker. I often wonder when styles and genres outdate themselves what will all the fl producers create next? Trap and EDM seem to be evolving into what, I don't know. But I do know that there is always a new style of music that will come into play and change the game. All the best!!!!
Old 24th July 2017
  #18
Here for the gear
Reading about everyones view on time signature/tempo changes has inspired me to try it myself! Thanks ppl .
Old 25th July 2017
  #19
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by roaringwave View Post
Fl Studio has sequencer fingerprints that 99% of the time is quite easy to detect based upon the genre of music that it is calibrated\used for. The 'note splicer' is the most noticeable fingerprint. It's precision and timing along with it's panning and tuning editing let's you know that fl studio's sequencer is being used.

Although many other DAWs have similar features. Fl Studio's feature is very simple to use and manipulate when it comes to that. It's faster and more intuitive specifically in that department where it is quite heavily used. Like I said before, I like Fl Studio. But, I can not use it for every genre of music. Especially when it comes to composing with time signature changes and recording live analog. I find it not so good in that department. In Cubase, this is a breeze to do. But if you write music with no Time signature changes/Tempo changes then Fl Studio may be just for you. But to me, I find music without that to be quite static. I have tendency to get bored with static tempos and timing arrangements.

Lastly, the piano roll in fl studio is sweet but, it is simple no match to Cubase's piano roll imo. The only good part in Fl's piano roll is the note splice feature. Other than that it is quite basic when it comes to midi editing compared to Cubase. Fl studio is the best Trap Daw/EDM out. It's in its own lane in those genres. Although trap and edm can be made on just about any daw, fl seems to get to the finishing line alot quicker. I often wonder when styles and genres outdate themselves what will all the fl producers create next? Trap and EDM seem to be evolving into what, I don't know. But I do know that there is always a new style of music that will come into play and change the game. All the best!!!!
man great input. So if you record from the metro nome via midi keyboard and record in all your melodies live basically you can still tell its FL studio regardless?

I produce more of the g funk/westcoast style beats using FL studio and love the work flow. I think in hip hop not many tracks change tempo..that would sound kind of off to me.

Could you show me a few songs that change time signature and tempo?

I know classical music would do that but anything modern?
Old 25th July 2017
  #20
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
Humanizing Fl Studio tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by varun213 View Post
man great input. So if you record from the metro nome via midi keyboard and record in all your melodies live basically you can still tell its FL studio regardless?

I produce more of the g funk/westcoast style beats using FL studio and love the work flow. I think in hip hop not many tracks change tempo..that would sound kind of off to me.

Could you show me a few songs that change time signature and tempo?

I know classical music would do that but anything modern?
Even if you don't use tempo changes/time signature changes it's ok. But like I said, "It is very static and not humanized. Try this, say that you have a G-Funk track at a tempo of 80bpm. Make a copy of the pattern and alter the tempo to 80.5bpm in the song mode and of course change a hi hat/kick/snare or two in that copied pattern. Make other patterns in the song mode to drift up to 81.5bpm then back down to 80bpm, then go down to 79bpm/79.5bpm. I normally allow my tempo to drift +or - 1 to 2 to 3bpm. This will humanize your song and won't be noticeable, but I guarantee that it will have a better feel than any Static tempo composition.

I have heard a few FL studio songs with a Time Signature change. But, it really isn't a true Time Signature change because all that the 'Beatmakers' do is make the pattern a double time from the same tempo or vice-versa. A real Time signature change in FL Studio would be to create another pattern of 12 beats per say, which would make it a 3/4 time signature. By creating odd number meters you can make any time signature change in FL Studio. But then when you put these patterns in the song mode you have to calculate a tempo that fits the adjustment. This is where FL Studio lags in because this procedure is very very awkward to do. Where as in Cubase it is just as easy as FL Studios Note splice feature. It is very simple to do in Cubase, it's easy as slicing a sweet potato pie!

Little\,minor adjustments in tempo changes will make you track stand out from the 'static' producers. They can't hear it (tempo), but they will feel it.

When I make hip hop I normally sneak in as many slight tempo changes as possible. Nothing drastic, just 1 to 2 bpm up or down. And if I use samples, I make the samples match the tempo changes so they don't fall out of sync. When I compose other styles of music like rock/r&b/C&W/Jazz etc., I do plenty of time signature and tempo changes. Sometimes drastic tempo\time signature changes if the song requires it (most Rock songs do). And, people always think and ask me about the 'Band' that I recorded (ha!). When it really isn't a band at all, it's just me making the composition with an authentic human feel. You will never know that it is just one person doing it all. This is a breeze to do in Cubase.

Trust me, I have worked on every sequencer Daw program and I know in detail all of them to the T. Cubases sequence/piano roll is on another level when it comes to "Composing music in a more natural way or mechanical and, it has it's own 'splice-like' feature and a Hold and Roll notes entering exactly like the MPC hardware has. Most Producers of Trap/Edm haven't a clue about these unique features that put Cubase in an equal when comparing to the note splice feature in Fl Studio. Producers are just stuck on there Daw of choice and I have no problem with that at all. Use what you have and make the best out of it.

Lastly, I heard only a few tempo changes by people that produce music on FL Studio. I will research this and tell you specifically what songs that have real tempo changes, not the half\double time cheating way that you hear so much of........... All The Best!!!!
Old 25th July 2017
  #21
Lives for gear
 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by roaringwave View Post
Even if you don't use tempo changes/time signature changes it's ok. But like I said, "It is very static and not humanized. Try this, say that you have a G-Funk track at a tempo of 80bpm. Make a copy of the pattern and alter the tempo to 80.5bpm in the song mode and of course change a hi hat/kick/snare or two in that copied pattern. Make other patterns in the song mode to drift up to 81.5bpm then back down to 80bpm, then go down to 79bpm/79.5bpm. I normally allow my tempo to drift +or - 1 to 2 to 3bpm. This will humanize your song and won't be noticeable, but I guarantee that it will have a better feel than any Static tempo composition.

I have heard a few FL studio songs with a Time Signature change. But, it really isn't a true Time Signature change because all that the 'Beatmakers' do is make the pattern a double time from the same tempo or vice-versa. A real Time signature change in FL Studio would be to create another pattern of 12 beats per say, which would make it a 3/4 time signature. By creating odd number meters you can make any time signature change in FL Studio. But then when you put these patterns in the song mode you have to calculate a tempo that fits the adjustment. This is where FL Studio lags in because this procedure is very very awkward to do. Where as in Cubase it is just as easy as FL Studios Note splice feature. It is very simple to do in Cubase, it's easy as slicing a sweet potato pie!

Little\,minor adjustments in tempo changes will make you track stand out from the 'static' producers. They can't hear it (tempo), but they will feel it.

When I make hip hop I normally sneak in as many slight tempo changes as possible. Nothing drastic, just 1 to 2 bpm up or down. And if I use samples, I make the samples match the tempo changes so they don't fall out of sync. When I compose other styles of music like rock/r&b/C&W/Jazz etc., I do plenty of time signature and tempo changes. Sometimes drastic tempo\time signature changes if the song requires it (most Rock songs do). And, people always think and ask me about the 'Band' that I recorded (ha!). When it really isn't a band at all, it's just me making the composition with an authentic human feel. You will never know that it is just one person doing it all. This is a breeze to do in Cubase.

Trust me, I have worked on every sequencer Daw program and I know in detail all of them to the T. Cubases sequence/piano roll is on another level when it comes to "Composing music in a more natural way or mechanical and, it has it's own 'splice-like' feature and a Hold and Roll notes entering exactly like the MPC hardware has. Most Producers of Trap/Edm haven't a clue about these unique features that put Cubase in an equal when comparing to the note splice feature in Fl Studio. Producers are just stuck on there Daw of choice and I have no problem with that at all. Use what you have and make the best out of it.

Lastly, I heard only a few tempo changes by people that produce music on FL Studio. I will research this and tell you specifically what songs that have real tempo changes, not the half\double time cheating way that you hear so much of........... All The Best!!!!
Pretty sure that people avoided cubase because of the cost, not the functionality. Most DAWs (incl. Ableton now) are extremely intimidating cost wise for bedroom producers. I don't disagree there's a FL Studio sound to an extent but it's def not limited to that.

Tempo meandering is really easy to do now in FL Studio (it used to kill the performance). A quick test with some massive wavs and a bunch of midi shows it all works in real time. Time signatures you have to do manually using the 'beat' snapping in the song view etc. HOWEVER they have pretty much promised it's coming in for FL 13.
Old 25th July 2017
  #22
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtROBOT View Post
Pretty sure that people avoided cubase because of the cost, not the functionality. Most DAWs (incl. Ableton now) are extremely intimidating cost wise for bedroom producers. I don't disagree there's a FL Studio sound to an extent but it's def not limited to that.

Tempo meandering is really easy to do now in FL Studio (it used to kill the performance). A quick test with some massive wavs and a bunch of midi shows it all works in real time. Time signatures you have to do manually using the 'beat' snapping in the song view etc. HOWEVER they have pretty much promised it's coming in for FL 13.

I agree with you on the tempo automation in Fl Studio. It's cool now. But the time signature change implementation needs to be completely re-hauled. It is a very strange way to do it. I believe that it should be done like all other daws do theirs. Once they do that in FL 13, it will make it a useful DAW for most serious composers. Imagine this: setting your time signatures and FL Studio creates the exact number of beats in the pattern mode for your blank pattern. Now that would be cool if it could do that.

I also agree with you on the cost of said Daws. They are extremely high to me too. Fl Studio's price is a great bang for the buck. And to be honest, I hear more hit records being created using Fl Studio than most daws put together. This is no joke. Fl, despite its shortcomings still is the most highly rated Daw on the market. It is the number one production daw out for creating hip-hop/R&B and EDM. I know that a lot of ableton users may disagree but, you have to admit that more hits are being done using this daw than all daws put together. Yes, this is true. And with it being affordable to most users naturally, it is the way to go for most young aspiring producers. It is just a slick Daw. I watched it grow up from being the laughed about wimpy kid who gets sand kicked in his face on the beach to the body building muscle-freak who now all the hottest girls at the beach drool over! Ha!

Lastly the only limit to the Fl Studio sound is the person who uses it. People have a tendency to follow trends instead of trying to create them. I like to bend the genres and transform them into something new and fresh. Everyone, well mostly everyone seems to sound the same. How many EDM and Trap records are really distinguishable from each other? Not many. It's like seeing a bunch of Elvis Presly's walking around all looking and sounding the same like the original one does.
Old 26th July 2017
  #23
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by roaringwave View Post
Even if you don't use tempo changes/time signature changes it's ok. But like I said, "It is very static and not humanized. Try this, say that you have a G-Funk track at a tempo of 80bpm. Make a copy of the pattern and alter the tempo to 80.5bpm in the song mode and of course change a hi hat/kick/snare or two in that copied pattern. Make other patterns in the song mode to drift up to 81.5bpm then back down to 80bpm, then go down to 79bpm/79.5bpm. I normally allow my tempo to drift +or - 1 to 2 to 3bpm. This will humanize your song and won't be noticeable, but I guarantee that it will have a better feel than any Static tempo composition.

I have heard a few FL studio songs with a Time Signature change. But, it really isn't a true Time Signature change because all that the 'Beatmakers' do is make the pattern a double time from the same tempo or vice-versa. A real Time signature change in FL Studio would be to create another pattern of 12 beats per say, which would make it a 3/4 time signature. By creating odd number meters you can make any time signature change in FL Studio. But then when you put these patterns in the song mode you have to calculate a tempo that fits the adjustment. This is where FL Studio lags in because this procedure is very very awkward to do. Where as in Cubase it is just as easy as FL Studios Note splice feature. It is very simple to do in Cubase, it's easy as slicing a sweet potato pie!

Little\,minor adjustments in tempo changes will make you track stand out from the 'static' producers. They can't hear it (tempo), but they will feel it.

When I make hip hop I normally sneak in as many slight tempo changes as possible. Nothing drastic, just 1 to 2 bpm up or down. And if I use samples, I make the samples match the tempo changes so they don't fall out of sync. When I compose other styles of music like rock/r&b/C&W/Jazz etc., I do plenty of time signature and tempo changes. Sometimes drastic tempo\time signature changes if the song requires it (most Rock songs do). And, people always think and ask me about the 'Band' that I recorded (ha!). When it really isn't a band at all, it's just me making the composition with an authentic human feel. You will never know that it is just one person doing it all. This is a breeze to do in Cubase.

Trust me, I have worked on every sequencer Daw program and I know in detail all of them to the T. Cubases sequence/piano roll is on another level when it comes to "Composing music in a more natural way or mechanical and, it has it's own 'splice-like' feature and a Hold and Roll notes entering exactly like the MPC hardware has. Most Producers of Trap/Edm haven't a clue about these unique features that put Cubase in an equal when comparing to the note splice feature in Fl Studio. Producers are just stuck on there Daw of choice and I have no problem with that at all. Use what you have and make the best out of it.

Lastly, I heard only a few tempo changes by people that produce music on FL Studio. I will research this and tell you specifically what songs that have real tempo changes, not the half\double time cheating way that you hear so much of........... All The Best!!!!

thats a crazy breakdown. I cant even disagree with you on that. My thing is when would tempo change be most useful in a session?

I thought about it and im wondering for the listener when would they need a tempo change in the song their listening to, to avoid if from getting too stiff?
The halfway part of the verse? All the hooks? Bridges only?

As far as time signature changes during a song itself..i fail to notice if that ever happens in Hip hop music?

Going from say..4x4 measure to 3x7 wouldnt that just throw off the groove a bit?

sorry for sounding like a noob but this could really break some walls for me man.
Old 26th July 2017
  #24
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungle View Post
The developer (Gol is he still developing it, he seems to have gone quiet this last, as has FLS) was a complete and total a-hole, constantly saying things were not needed when they were, then totally forgetting all the other software and developers he had insulted when he finally bothered to integrate things.
It got tiresome for me personally so i moved on.
he is still there and he is still and arsehole. His trite comments and brush offs to the user base make me want to stove his head in with a guitar. I am kind of in too deep to quit it now as I am not sure I can be arsed to learn another DAW from scratch so I just ignore the IL forums completely
Old 26th July 2017
  #25
Lives for gear
 
12tone's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by varun213 View Post
thats a crazy breakdown. I cant even disagree with you on that. My thing is when would tempo change be most useful in a session?

I thought about it and im wondering for the listener when would they need a tempo change in the song their listening to, to avoid if from getting too stiff?
The halfway part of the verse? All the hooks? Bridges only?

As far as time signature changes during a song itself..i fail to notice if that ever happens in Hip hop music?

Going from say..4x4 measure to 3x7 wouldnt that just throw off the groove a bit?

sorry for sounding like a noob but this could really break some walls for me man.
Tempo and meter changes are basic functions that most every sequencer has.

Simple as that. It should be perfunctory.
Old 26th July 2017
  #26
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by varun213 View Post
thats a crazy breakdown. I cant even disagree with you on that. My thing is when would tempo change be most useful in a session?

I thought about it and im wondering for the listener when would they need a tempo change in the song their listening to, to avoid if from getting too stiff?
The halfway part of the verse? All the hooks? Bridges only?

As far as time signature changes during a song itself..i fail to notice if that ever happens in Hip hop music?

Going from say..4x4 measure to 3x7 wouldnt that just throw off the groove a bit?

sorry for sounding like a noob but this could really break some walls for me man.
Very gentle tempo changes are all that is necessary. Varying from 1 to 1.5 up or down. For instance, say you have a 16 bar verse at tempo 140bpm. Try somewhere in bar 5 139.5 bar 7 139.85, bar 9 139.55, bar 12 139.8, bar 16 140 and then the hook 141bpm until verse two back to 140bpm. It's and not really noticeable unless it's drastic.

As far time signature changes in hip hop, well it is quite rare. I've only heard it done once or twice maybe. But nonetheless it can be done with some very gratifying results. For example: say you have a 8 bar 3/4 intro at a tempo of say 150bpm or whatever you find comfortable. The verse starts at 4/4 and is 16 bars. The trick here is to make the two tempos properly transfer from one another. You may have to either speed up/slow down one of the two tempos in order to make them genuinely cohesive. Trust me, your track will rock. Hip Hop Music needs more variation and someday it will grow into this type of production. I do these production tricks all the time. Trust me they work wonders, especially 3/8 breaks right before the bridge. The 3/8 break is so so important when leading into a change or coming back into the verse. But you have to remember that to make it sound right you will have to adjust the tempos as they properly fit into your arrangement. None of this would throw off the beat if you properly tempo map your arrangements. If anything, it will enhance your creativity and put you way ahead of most hip hop producers who make static beats.

Like I said, I have nothing against static producers and their music. It just doesn't fit what I do as a composer. I am used to applying these techniques in my compositions because of my musical background in Classical/Jazz & Gospel/R&B Rock etc. I am ol' School, I read music also which helps but isn't necessary for many people to make great sounding recordings.

Last tip: You can make any odd meter signature sound like a 4/4 if you know the secret. You'd have to PM for that one. All the best!!!!!
Old 30th July 2017
  #27
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by roaringwave View Post
Very gentle tempo changes are all that is necessary. Varying from 1 to 1.5 up or down. For instance, say you have a 16 bar verse at tempo 140bpm. Try somewhere in bar 5 139.5 bar 7 139.85, bar 9 139.55, bar 12 139.8, bar 16 140 and then the hook 141bpm until verse two back to 140bpm. It's and not really noticeable unless it's drastic.

As far time signature changes in hip hop, well it is quite rare. I've only heard it done once or twice maybe. But nonetheless it can be done with some very gratifying results. For example: say you have a 8 bar 3/4 intro at a tempo of say 150bpm or whatever you find comfortable. The verse starts at 4/4 and is 16 bars. The trick here is to make the two tempos properly transfer from one another. You may have to either speed up/slow down one of the two tempos in order to make them genuinely cohesive. Trust me, your track will rock. Hip Hop Music needs more variation and someday it will grow into this type of production. I do these production tricks all the time. Trust me they work wonders, especially 3/8 breaks right before the bridge. The 3/8 break is so so important when leading into a change or coming back into the verse. But you have to remember that to make it sound right you will have to adjust the tempos as they properly fit into your arrangement. None of this would throw off the beat if you properly tempo map your arrangements. If anything, it will enhance your creativity and put you way ahead of most hip hop producers who make static beats.

Like I said, I have nothing against static producers and their music. It just doesn't fit what I do as a composer. I am used to applying these techniques in my compositions because of my musical background in Classical/Jazz & Gospel/R&B Rock etc. I am ol' School, I read music also which helps but isn't necessary for many people to make great sounding recordings.

Last tip: You can make any odd meter signature sound like a 4/4 if you know the secret. You'd have to PM for that one. All the best!!!!!
sent you a pm hope you got it
Old 12th November 2017
  #28
Here for the gear
Any pointers for some other daw with similarly "exotic" controls linking capabilities as FL? I mean taking dynamic measurement of sound level anywhere, running the result through some mathematical function and then treating it as one of the arguments for yet another function whose result will control whatever? Every now and then those options in FL draw me to fiddle with it, but after reaching some level of complexity everything falls apart, Fl crashes, can't properly open previous versions of the project, and it's been like that with older versions, too. I mean I'm hoping for a working music-making program, not some programming environment.
And to answer OP question mor clearly - because its a clunky bitch which tends to let you down when a project nears "fruition".
Old 12th November 2017
  #29
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
Tempo and meter changes are basic functions that most every sequencer has.

Simple as that. It should be perfunctory.
Tell it to Vegas folks and watch them go from green to red and back
Old 5th September 2018
  #30
Here for the gear
 

Since FL Studio is now cross platform, Mac user can't bash the compatibility. I think a lot of people bash it because of the low price point and because a lot of people have it. Also the mixer and playlist tracks take more time to organize.
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump