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How do you turn on or off the low end rumble filter
Old 27th December 2014
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

How do you turn on or off the low end rumble filter

Here he talks about a row end rumble filter on the CAD179 http://youtu.be/kGr6fGtb0Ek?t=1m11s but is the flat stick sign on the left turning it off or on?

Also if you turn this on does that negatively affect your bass voice? I want to emphasize the bassness of my voice in my recordings.
Old 27th December 2014
  #2
Lives for gear
Flat is the flat line. Low freq cut reduces rumble/bass freq below 100hz
http://www.hononegah.org/UserFiles/S...ls/cadm179.pdf
Old 27th December 2014
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

So you choose the one on the right (which is not the flat line) if you want more bass?
Old 27th December 2014
  #4
Lives for gear
freq charts are low freq on the left, high freq on the right. The line that ROLLS off on the left, means it CUTS Low freq, not adds it.

It cuts 6 db per octave which means 50hz will be 6 db less than at 100hz. 100hz is where the roll off starts.
Thats a more gentle roll off than some mic's that are 12db per octave.

When trying to keep lead vocals proportionate to the band mix, roll off some bottom with a highpass filter. Some mics and most consoles have this built in; common frequencies range from 60 Hz to 200 Hz, depending on design or manufacturer, with varying degrees of sloped attenuation (example: 6 dB per octave rolloff, from 100 hz down).

This filtering keeps excessive bass out of the vocal track and helps it fit in its proper frequency spectrum to make room for accompanying instruments. It also helps keep plosives (popped Ps and other hard consonants) from being obvious; that and a pop filter should eliminate them altogether. Most human voices don’t usually have a lot to offer below around 160 hz anyway, so you’re not losing much by cutting in that range.

Next, the reason for removing 4 to 6 dB at approximately 125 to 240 Hz is to keep the vocal out of the upper bass drum/bass guitar/fat drums area. You always want to be aware that cutting too much out can result in a thin vocal, so take it slowly and remove a little at a time.
Old 27th December 2014
  #5
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couch11's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manfrensengensen View Post
It cuts 6 db per octave which means 50hz will be 6 db less than at 100hz. 100hz is where the roll off starts.
Thats a more gentle roll of than some mic's that are 12db per octave.
Maybe, maybe not. With a center frequency set at 100Hz, a HPF should, theoretically, be already down 3dB at 100Hz. So at 50Hz you would be attenuating 9dB, not 6dB. Of course designers do not always adhere to this.

When the line is FLAT on the switch, you are not rolling off low end. When it is slanted down, you are cutting(gradually) everything below approximately 100Hz.

It might be better to use a software plug-in for your HPF as it will give you more options than the mic's filter. This way you can adjust your roll-off frequency and the amount you roll off(slope).
Old 27th December 2014
  #6
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by couch11 View Post
Maybe, maybe not. With a center frequency set at 100Hz, a HPF should, theoretically, be already down 3dB at 100Hz. So at 50Hz you would be attenuating 9dB, not 6dB. Of course designers do not always adhere to this.
He said that 50 Hz will be 6 dB less than 100 Hz, which as you stated should be 3 dB down from the nominal level. You are saying that 50 Hz should be 9 dB below the nominal level, which is exactly 6 dB less than 100 Hz, sou you are actually saying the same thing. But there is actually a problem, because there is quite a significant curve around the cutoff frequency, so an analog filter won't reach it's final slope in the first octave below the cutoff frequency, so 50 Hz is going to be quite a bit less than 6 dB down compared to 100 Hz. To get the exact number, you'd have to know the design of the filter, because there are some differences in behaviour around the cutoff frequency.
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