The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Tracking with EQ
Old 23rd July 2014
  #1
Tracking with EQ

I know it's probably best to do it by ear across the frequency spectrum and boost/cut what I feel is right...but are there any notable frequencies that I should be looking out for?

What are some frequencies you commonly cut?
What are some frequencies you commonly boost?
Old 23rd July 2014
  #2
Is there a particular reason you want to track through an EQ?
Old 23rd July 2014
  #3
Lives for gear
 
skillz335's Avatar
fundamentals.
Old 23rd July 2014
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by skillz335 View Post
fundamentals.
no fundamentals would be learning to use the right mic and put it in the right spot
Old 23rd July 2014
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bender412 View Post
Is there a particular reason you want to track through an EQ?
Just so I don't have to do extra conversion in the mixing process when using my outboard EQ. Personally think it's a lot easier if I can get the right sound when going into Pro Tools and not have to change it much.
Old 23rd July 2014
  #6
Gear Addict
 
Yumid's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skillz335 View Post
fundamentals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
no fundamentals would be learning to use the right mic and put it in the right spot

hahahahahahhahahahahha

whether the second poster was serious or not, this made my afternoon.
Old 23rd July 2014
  #7
Lives for gear
 
carlheinz's Avatar
 

Eq is like sugar or salt.A little here or there can help but too much and then your are up the creek.In tracking you want as little needed as possible unless you really know its the sound you want.There are many instruments that can play in different ranges in the audio spectrum .Your general question is too broad.There is no one size fits all answer for EQ.Theres a technical side in knowing what 100k...250k and 1k and 10k etc sounds like and in application ,its a simple matter of taste and discretion and intuition based on how one reacts as an engineer to the source sound presenting itself over speakers in a room.Don't be the rookie guy who needs to justify his need to be there by fixing problems that don't really exist by sweeping the eq on every channel when in fact the the raw sound is already working.People often forget the most important ingredient to great sound is the source and performance and arrangement creating the balance naturally.Separating and creating space in the choice of drum patterns..bass and guitar...and how that relates to the vocal is key .What is good and right is pure opinion.The best EQ is the source instrument.From there it's Mic and where its located.From there you gotta use your ears.
Old 23rd July 2014
  #8
Gear Addict
 
Yumid's Avatar
 

Ok serious time now. The only thing we can tell you for sure about SOMEWHAT of a formula for EQing is in most cases, but not all cut the 3rd harmonic. It does the same job as the fundamental(original formant harmonic of the sound) so when you cut it; the sound maintains its formant/original sound but it is a lot less cloudy opening up room for other instruments.

Other then that its all situational. If you'd done any research, or ever EQed anything you'd probably figure that out real quick on your own.
Old 23rd July 2014
  #9
Gear Guru
Can you explain that a bit more? Is that based on the key of the tune? How do you calculate that? Really curious!
Old 23rd July 2014
  #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yumid View Post
hahahahahahhahahahahha

whether the second poster was serious or not, this made my afternoon.
If you meant me I'm dead serious.
Old 24th July 2014
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by carlheinz View Post
Eq is like sugar or salt.A little here or there can help but too much and then your are up the creek.In tracking you want as little needed as possible unless you really know its the sound you want.There are many instruments that can play in different ranges in the audio spectrum .Your general question is too broad.There is no one size fits all answer for EQ.Theres a technical side in knowing what 100k...250k and 1k and 10k etc sounds like and in application ,its a simple matter of taste and discretion and intuition based on how one reacts as an engineer to the source sound presenting itself over speakers in a room.Don't be the rookie guy who needs to justify his need to be there by fixing problems that don't really exist by sweeping the eq on every channel when in fact the the raw sound is already working.People often forget the most important ingredient to great sound is the source and performance and arrangement creating the balance naturally.Separating and creating space in the choice of drum patterns..bass and guitar...and how that relates to the vocal is key .What is good and right is pure opinion.The best EQ is the source instrument.From there it's Mic and where its located.From there you gotta use your ears.
thanks for your helpful reply. I completely forgot to mention the source that I would be EQ'ing. I'm talking about EQ'ing vox in particular during tracking. I've read about cutting the "nasally" frequencies. Is that something I should try to do during tracking? Also around 7k cut to reduce sibilance? My outboard gear is limited so I would just like to do as much as I can going into Pro Tools.
Old 24th July 2014
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trademark Studio View Post
thanks for your helpful reply. I completely forgot to mention the source that I would be EQ'ing. I'm talking about EQ'ing vox in particular during tracking. I've read about cutting the "nasally" frequencies. Is that something I should try to do during tracking? Also around 7k cut to reduce sibilance? My outboard gear is limited so I would just like to do as much as I can going into Pro Tools.
Not to sound judgmental, but considering the fact that you're posting in the newbie section, and based on the questions you're asking, I would recommend not EQing on the way in. I understand why you want to, but it's a little dangerous unless you're really confident in what you're doing.
Old 24th July 2014
  #13
Gear Addict
 
Ave Crux's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
no fundamentals would be learning to use the right mic and put it in the right spot
I think he meant fundamental frequencies.

And to the OP, the only thing I would really do nowadays in terms of EQ'ing while tracking, will be some form of HPF and/or maybe a slight cut around 100-300hz (that depends on what I am tracking though, I would do this for vocals sometimes for example).

If I was to EQ while tracking, perhaps 80% of the time I have a compressor right after, because I would wanna high pass something to avoid pumping as much as I can on my compressor (again, really depends on what it is I'm tracking... for example in this instance, it would be a bass guitar). This isnt the same as the HPF on some compressors.

Otherwise the other 20% would just be for some experimental stuff.
Old 24th July 2014
  #14
If it needs more highs, add more highs. If it needs more lows, add more lows. See where I'm going with this?

Being new you're probably not going to know. When I started working in a real studio I realized some of the sounds I used to think were bad... the engineers would wouldn't even be bothered by it and the final mix would sound fantastic. Use a plugin for now young padawan. Good luck!
Old 24th July 2014
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ave Crux View Post
I think he meant fundamental frequencies.

And to the OP, the only thing I would really do nowadays in terms of EQ'ing while tracking, will be some form of HPF and/or maybe a slight cut around 100-300hz (that depends on what I am tracking though, I would do this for vocals sometimes for example).

If I was to EQ while tracking, perhaps 80% of the time I have a compressor right after, because I would wanna high pass something to avoid pumping as much as I can on my compressor (again, really depends on what it is I'm tracking... for example in this instance, it would be a bass guitar). This isnt the same as the HPF on some compressors.

Otherwise the other 20% would just be for some experimental stuff.
thanks very helpful.
Old 24th July 2014
  #16
Gear Addict
 
Yumid's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
If you meant me I'm dead serious.
haha the guy before you meant fundamental frequencies..I thought you were just being sarcastic and treating OPs question as a joke.

It may have been a complete accident but it was a hilarious one.
Old 24th July 2014
  #17
Lives for gear
 
skillz335's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
no fundamentals would be learning to use the right mic and put it in the right spot
Old 25th July 2014
  #18
Here for the gear
 

EQ

Quote:
Originally Posted by carlheinz View Post
Eq is like sugar or salt.A little here or there can help but too much and then your are up the creek.In tracking you want as little needed as possible unless you really know its the sound you want.There are many instruments that can play in different ranges in the audio spectrum .Your general question is too broad.There is no one size fits all answer for EQ.Theres a technical side in knowing what 100k...250k and 1k and 10k etc sounds like and in application ,its a simple matter of taste and discretion and intuition based on how one reacts as an engineer to the source sound presenting itself over speakers in a room.Don't be the rookie guy who needs to justify his need to be there by fixing problems that don't really exist by sweeping the eq on every channel when in fact the the raw sound is already working.People often forget the most important ingredient to great sound is the source and performance and arrangement creating the balance naturally.Separating and creating space in the choice of drum patterns..bass and guitar...and how that relates to the vocal is key .What is good and right is pure opinion.The best EQ is the source instrument.From there it's Mic and where its located.From there you gotta use your ears.
Thanks, I needed to read your information. I'm in school and the talk constantly is does your mixes need any EQ? A great sound is in the source, performance, and arrangement to balance naturally. DAG
Old 25th July 2014
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ave Crux View Post
I think he meant fundamental frequencies.
You can tell that from a one word answer? The fact is if you're using a decent and mic and chain you shouldn't need to eq on the way in. You might want to eq a bit after you have finished your track in the mix. Lately I've had to deal with quite a few projects where the vocals were completely over processed. I know it's more fun to turn a knob but really you should start by really listening to your source.
Old 25th July 2014
  #20
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
no fundamentals would be learning to use the right mic and put it in the right spot

Not really possible with some stuff like drums. No mic placement in the world is going to reduce the low mid cardboard that needs to be eliminated on kick and tom.

If you have endless time you can mess around with tuning, heads, beaters, different drums, muffling tape, pillows whatever ... but if you are under the gun with a client you have to eq drums there is no way around it if you want a pro sound. Unless you have an endless supply of mics for all types of voices, vocals will often need eq,

Always got a kick out reading books about the Beatles and how the engineers brag about not using Eq, They also spent 6 month on an albums
and had access to unlimited instruments and mics.

When you have a bunch of metal heads and punkers coming in your studio day to day who have bad gear and they have paper route money budgets, you need to be able to reach for the eq if you want to get good sounds.
Old 25th July 2014
  #21
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trademark Studio View Post
I know it's probably best to do it by ear across the frequency spectrum and boost/cut what I feel is right...but are there any notable frequencies that I should be looking out for?

What are some frequencies you commonly cut?
What are some frequencies you commonly boost?
In general you are going to use HP or LPF on virtually everything
If it's not a bass, kick or low tom, low synth you hipass it always to eliminate rumble and ultra lowed distortion. On stuff that has no ultra high end you lowpass it to eliminate potential hiss and shrill. Sometimes you low pass for clarity if things are busy up there

On drums you are usually going to need to cut the cheap cardboard frequencies in the 250-400 range on kick (depends on tuning and size of drum). This goes for bigger toms too. Sometimes you even have to shave the room mics in this area and snare.


Guitars it depends, but problem areas are 180 haze (cut), 250 mud (cut), 2.5-3.5k (boost...could use the presence on the amp) ... 6k (fizz cut).. these cuts are not always needed though, just look out for these areas. Be aware of them.


There are 100s of other guidelines but depends on the music style and the instruments timber.
Old 25th July 2014
  #22
Lives for gear
 
skillz335's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
You can tell that from a one word answer?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trademark Studio View Post
are there any notable frequencies that I should be looking out for?

What are some frequencies you commonly cut?
What are some frequencies you commonly boost?


fundamentals.
Old 25th July 2014
  #23
Lives for gear
 
12ax7's Avatar
 

I used to track with EQ ALOT more back in the days when I was tracking to analog tape; the reason being that IF I KNEW (for damn sure) that I was gonna have to push the high end of the track in the mix, I would rather just go ahead and do it before the tape (so that cranking it later wouldn't boost the tape hiss along with the "good stuff").

These days, I don't track with EQ NEARLY as often anymore.
.
...But the short answer to the OP's question is:

If you're asking what frequencies to EQ, then you OBVIOUSLY don't know enough about what will be needed at mix time well enough to justify marrying yourself to an EQ setting!

...So my advice to the OP is to learn more about mixing and EQ BEFORE you start committing to such things on an original track!
.
Old 25th July 2014
  #24
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12ax7 View Post
...But the short answer to the OP's question is:

If you're asking what frequencies to EQ, then you OBVIOUSLY don't know enough about what will be needed at mix time well enough to justify marrying yourself to an EQ setting!

...So my advice to the OP is to learn more about mixing and EQ BEFORE you start committing to such things on an original track!
[/INDENT].
I tried to tell him in post #12
Old 25th July 2014
  #25
Quote:
Originally Posted by chainrule View Post
Not really possible with some stuff like drums. No mic placement in the world is going to reduce the low mid cardboard that needs to be eliminated on kick and tom.

If you have endless time you can mess around with tuning, heads, beaters, different drums, muffling tape, pillows whatever ... but if you are under the gun with a client you have to eq drums there is no way around it if you want a pro sound. Unless you have an endless supply of mics for all types of voices, vocals will often need eq,

Always got a kick out reading books about the Beatles and how the engineers brag about not using Eq, They also spent 6 month on an albums
and had access to unlimited instruments and mics.

When you have a bunch of metal heads and punkers coming in your studio day to day who have bad gear and they have paper route money budgets, you need to be able to reach for the eq if you want to get good sounds.
You really wouldn't want to bet on that would you? If you know what you're doing have good mics and pre's and know where to put the mic's and which ones will work for the application you can totally get excellent drum sounds with no eq. And in the mix I wind up using just a little eq to make things fit a little better
https://www.gearslutz.com/board/work-...es+from+basics post # 88
Old 25th July 2014
  #26
Gear Addict
 
Ave Crux's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
You can tell that from a one word answer? The fact is if you're using a decent and mic and chain you shouldn't need to eq on the way in. You might want to eq a bit after you have finished your track in the mix. Lately I've had to deal with quite a few projects where the vocals were completely over processed. I know it's more fun to turn a knob but really you should start by really listening to your source.
Your answer was a completely valid and acceptable answer.

I was only speaking in terms of the relative question the OP asked and skillz's answer. You might have misunderstood it from Bender's first response before his (which I think makes sense also anyway), and I just wanted to point it out there.
Old 28th July 2014
  #27
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab View Post
You really wouldn't want to bet on that would you? If you know what you're doing have good mics and pre's and know where to put the mic's and which ones will work for the application you can totally get excellent drum sounds with no eq. And in the mix I wind up using just a little eq to make things fit a little better
https://www.gearslutz.com/board/work-...es+from+basics post # 88
It's tough to get a good drum sound day in and day out with average bands playing average equipment without eq....

I checked out that thread it said nothing about not using equalizers. I'm sure people used eq on all those recordings.

but didn't hear too many high level recordings if any, though I didn't go through the whole thread
Old 28th July 2014
  #28
Wish I knew what "100k" and "250k" sounds like...

Quote:
Originally Posted by carlheinz View Post
Eq is like sugar or salt. [...] Your general question is too broad.There is no one size fits all answer for EQ.Theres a technical side in knowing what 100k...250k and 1k and 10k etc sounds like and in application, it's a simple matter of taste and discretion and intuition based on how one reacts as an engineer to the source sound presenting itself over speakers in a room.
Old 28th July 2014
  #29
GREAT records were tracked in GREAT rooms by GREAT engineers for many years. Many selected the right mic, put it in the right place, then EQ'd and compressed that SOB to taste. Commit. Done.
Old 28th July 2014
  #30
Gear Head
 
Yippie37's Avatar
 

400 hz sucks
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump