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Music Producers as a career Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 2nd March 2014
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Music Producers as a career

Hi, I'm a junior in High School who is about to take the ACT test on tuesday. I'm starting to go through a mid-highschool crisis and am completely unsure as what I want to do as a career after I am done with my education.

For years I'd planned on becoming a music producer. I'm a great songwriter, a beginner to recording music, and a smart, determined individual. I love making music, despite how frustrating it can be.

The problem is, as you may know, that being a Music Producer isn't exactly the most financially stable job ever. Website tell me that a Producer makes anywhere from $20,000 a year to A million dollars a year. That is a huge gap, and there are a lot of "if's" that play as huge factors on your salary. I don't want to live in a studio apartment my whole life.

Also, I have no idea what to do as training for this career after high school. Ive read mixed reviews on Full Sail university and the Art Institutes. Some people say that just an internship in a Studio after highschool is enough education. But I want to go to college, and I have really good grades. Plus, college is the economically smart thing to do.

What I wanted to ask all those who do make a living in the recording industry, is if it's all worth it? Does doing what you love outweigh all the financial uncertainty? If you guys had to do it all again, would you pick a different career path? And if you think I should go into this industry, what would be a good route as far as Education after High School is concerned? I am so unsure with myself, that I'm hoping some of you may be able to help me find some confidence.

Any answers would be greatly appreciated.
Old 2nd March 2014
  #2
Gear Addict
 
ZombieMorg's Avatar
 

I think a lot of people on here will tell you to study something financially stable in the business or legal areas, and then do music stuff on the side. It's a logical choice and I wish I had done that before I started a degree in music!
Old 2nd March 2014
  #3
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Thanks, that's definitely something I'll have to look into
Old 3rd March 2014
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Get a degree in electrical engineering with a minor in music and you'd be set. Try to intern during the summer! No matter what you do, keep making music
Old 3rd March 2014
  #5
Moderator
 
matt thomas's Avatar
If I was looking for an intern in a studio, I would much prefer someone with a good personality, who can play an instrument competently, who has an interest in audio engineering and a degree in electronic engineering, over someone with a degree in audio engineering.

I know others who feel the same, but that is not to say it's universal.

matt
Old 3rd March 2014
  #6
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matthollenberg's Avatar
 

Many people (who I've talked with) who are in the music industry started out with a full time job outside of the music industry and did their music stuff (booking, production, etc.) on the side until they were financially stable enough to pursue the music as a career. That being said, studying music business is not a bad call. There are many aspects of the music industry that will help in any business setting, but there are also many part that are exclusive to the music industry. I'd recommend studying it.
Old 3rd March 2014
  #7
Here for the gear
 

Thanks everyone, this is helping a lot. I at the very least it makes me more confident in myself and my career choices.
Old 3rd March 2014
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

I'm only 1 year out of high school so take my opinion with a grain of salt. I decided to go to a straight up conservatory instead of actual college to study what I love full time. Let me tell you that I have never been nearly so happy in my life. I wake up everyday thrilled to go to classes/auditions/studio. I get so much joy and fufillment in everything I do. As cliche as it is, it's a type of happiness money can't buy. So I say go for your dreams full force. Then again, I've got many years in which I could learn to regret my decision but right now my life is amazing.
Old 3rd March 2014
  #9
Lives for gear
 

No no no no....... and no.....

What the website left out is 90% of producers don't even make $20k.... or even rent money....

What studio are you going to "produce" out of? Are you planning on setting up you own (have 50k?)? Do you know how much rent and electric cost? What happens when you have no clients for a month and bills are due?

Let me ask you one more very important question, why would someone choose you?

For instance, (I know this sounds like bragging, but trust me I am just trying to save you years of disappointment in life). "I" (and about 10,000 other guys) have about 15 years more experience, a full recording studio full of Neve and Neumann. I am a classically trained musician who has played for 20 years. Can play all the instruments. Performed Bach to Mozart to rock and country. Ear for harmony etc etc etc etc etc...

The point is, there are thousands of people who are already doing what you want to do, potentially better than you can do it.

So again, what makes you stand out?

More importantly, can't you still can stand out and produce while getting a real job? Think about it.

From 18-30 you can try to be a "producer", most likely fail, and spend the rest of your life working a ****ty job because you have a worthless (in the real world) education and a pile of debt.

or

18 to 35, go to school, start a good career, a family. Your now comfortable in life and have the means to pursue music seriously for the rest of your life.

Just because you work a real job does not mean you are giving up music. Take the next few years and work on actually producing some music for some local artists your age. Remember your not gonna get a gig producing right out of "school" (more on that later) until you have some actual music to show a potential client.

Again, not trying to sound like a big shot, or piss in your cherrios, just giving you a little reality check. If you really LOVE music, like practice an instrument 6 hours a day love music. You may want to pursue music education. At least then you will learn how to be a great musician (and have health insurance). That in turn will attract clients because you will have something to actually offer.

One more question, what is a I vi IV V progression in C.

If you can't answer that question, you have a LLOOOOOONNNGGGG way to go before your ready to produce someones album.

I sincerely wish you the best of luck. Also, by no means am I trying to turn you away from producing music. Just a dose of reality to prevent you from screwing up you life.

P.s. college debt can ruin your life. If you are going to be a doctor, lawyer, engineer, or accountant yes go to college. If not, you might end up with a useless $150k piece of paper and a ****ty job.


pps WTF do they teach someone in "producer school"? I hope they are teaching you how to hear chord progressions and deal with crying clients, because in the real world, you need to do both.

Last edited by vintagelove; 4th March 2014 at 04:04 AM.. Reason: ! fixed
Old 3rd March 2014
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
If I was looking for an intern in a studio, I would much prefer someone with a good personality, who can play an instrument competently, who has an interest in audio engineering and a degree in electronic engineering, over someone with a degree in audio engineering.

I know others who feel the same, but that is not to say it's universal.

matt


Oh and this x100000000
Old 3rd March 2014
  #11
Moderator
 
matt thomas's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagelove View Post

One more question, what is a ! vi IV V progression in C.
I wondering what the exclamation mark was, then I realised you probably meant a 1.

and to the original poster:

The things that a hugely successful producer have over others do not include audio school. Typically they are things like people skills, being good at selling themselves, good contacts, and luck.

You should also look at Sylvia Massey's answer to what a producer does here:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/q-syl...-producer.html

matt
Old 4th March 2014
  #12
Unless an exclamation mark is one of those super secret items of esoterica, veiled in mystery and understood only by those with multiple decades in the industry.

Like... they say Bob Katz is only now finding out about it.

My advice is unfortunately informed by my own experience, but I say just ignore everyone who tells you it can't be done, you need a reasonable fall-back plan, have a whole other career first and then do it.... internally, you know quite well what you want your life to be about. So... just do it.
Old 4th March 2014
  #13
Gear Head
 

Graduate law school. Profit. Buy gear.
Old 4th March 2014
  #14
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalikat View Post
a mid-highschool crisis
a producer is like a coach. hard to coach if you haven't played the game.


here's what you do: same thing as everyone else. after 20-30 years of that, take what you learned, and try to help the next idiot.

producing.
Old 4th March 2014
  #15
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

A producer is like a coach and even more like a theatrical director. It's somebody skilled at bringing a great performance out of others. Some of the best have not been musicians or engineers but rather fans. Most successful producers have assisted or worked in some other role with another successful producer earlier in their career.
Old 5th March 2014
  #16
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Thanks for the advice, guys. This is all really helping me figure some things out
Old 6th March 2014
  #17
Here for the gear
+1 on electrical engineering. Computer science also be a good option. Lots of computer troubleshooting to be done in recording today and plenty of money to be made in tech (music and non-music alike). Studying finance or accounting never hurt anyone. Producing records is still businesses with a bottom line after all.

Edit: Ignore anyone who tells you to go to law school unless that person is actually an attorney. You will soon find that no one is telling you to go to law school.
Old 6th March 2014
  #18
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Responding to the above post, please take with a grain (or two) of salt because I do not have first hand experience.

fwiw, a gentleman I know who is a lawyer says it is tough to get a job as a lawyer right now for people just graduating because there are too many people getting law degrees.
Old 8th March 2014
  #19
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I'm not planning on going to law school, I just need advice on whether or not being a music producer is a good choice as a career
Old 8th March 2014
  #20
Well... the problem is, it's the kind of question that no one but you yourself have the answer to.

I mean, there are two answers, or three: yes, no, maybe. And even then, these will reflect alot more on the people giving you the answer. For an example from real life, when I was building my studio, and my *well meaning* neighbors understood what I as doing, they said, "hey, why don't you get a job as a clerk in a hardware store, and then you can do recording at night?"

Instinctively, I regarded this as dreadful advice: does anyone want to go to a studio run as a sidelight? Would you go to a doctor who worked as a clerk in a hardware store, but he really had a passion for medicine and did it at night???

What I understood them to be saying was this: if we were considering this plan, we would have zero faith in ourselves, and regard it as a part-time hobby. So we would get a *real* job, instead of seriously trying to make a go of it.

And-- that's why I'd say to you: if you are crazy enough to even be thinking about it, you probably have a burning desire to make it happen, and this internal burning desire is what you should listen to-- not anything or anyone else.
Old 8th March 2014
  #21
Gear Nut
 

I think your best bet before you make any sort of decision is to go intern in a studio environment and see if you like it. Audio engineering degree is probably a waste of money to start with, you can learn the basics at home on your computer/internet.

Just remember as well, a lot of advice you get from people on the net is from people who have time to be posting on forums.. i.e. not working much. And people not working much are usually pretty bitter.

But its a tough creative industry like any and to succeed you have to be well networked, lucky, work hard and really bloody good at what you do (though this is probably least important).

I've chosen not to bother with it because I love music, and I don't want to turn one of my favourite things in life into a job.
Old 9th March 2014
  #22
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kalikat View Post
I'm not planning on going to law school, I just need advice on whether or not being a music producer is a good choice as a career
it's kind of like asking is being a movie star a good choice as a career?

is being a professional basketball player a good choice as a career?

how about novelist?

how about Astronaut?

these are the kinds of things that "everybody" wants to be. The millions of wannabees vying for the tiny handful of slots creates an overpressure that is tremendous. If you pass the relevant exams, there are 1000s of hospitals and medical groups looking to hire doctors or nurses. If you have an "MD" or "RN" after your name, you will always be able to find a job somewhere.

Degree or no, there is no organization or agency that is "hiring" music producers. The word 'career' implies a sequence of steps - a track. Get this education, start here, work you way up to there.

For Music Producer, there is no "path" to get there. And so much is up to chance. If you don't understand this, you won't even realize that you are asking the wrong questions.

You will have to make your own path. That's a lot less certain than "going to school for"....downright scary, in fact. As vintagelove said, most people doing this are not making any money. I bet a lot of them are losing money. Only you can decide if that's what you want to try for, but it's not really a career choice the way doctor, lawyer, accountant, architect, butcher, or cook is.
Old 9th March 2014
  #23
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalikat View Post
I'm not planning on going to law school, I just need advice on whether or not being a music producer is a good choice as a career
Is that REALLY your question? Even a minute amout of research on the state of the industry and Webster's definition of "career" will give you a perfectly black and white, straight up answer. Should only take you a half hour or so to sus things out.

But if you must continue the question......

My stock (short) answer is that if you have to ask...... Well....then no.

You say your'e a "great" songwriter. How many songs have you placed with known artists? What's your biggest success in the biz? All great songwriters have placed songs. Sorry,,,,I don't mean to be so blunt - but get used to it if you want into the music "business". It's not for the thin skinned...

Here's my advice. You're in HS. Go chase some girls or something. The last thing you should be worrying about is a career in music. But come to think of it, half the guys in the music biz got INTO it because they wanted to chase girls, so maybe that's your best "career" step at this point.

But back on track -

What the website stats forgot to inform you of.....

80% of producers make $20k to zero.
15% of producers make $20k to $50k. (Barely subsistence in the cities you will need to live in to "make it" as a producer.
3% of producers make $50k to $200k - (these guys generally have a NICE studio, a home, and probably a family as they are *mostly* not in their 20's.)
2% (extremely optimistic) of producers make $200k to a million and over - most of those guys are guys that grew up and "made it" in the old paradigm (ie: when people used to BUY music).

If you even have to ask yourself if this is something you can do, if you can and or need to make money, if you can or need or want to support a family, etc., then do yourself a favor and don't do it. Do something else you like where you can make money and provide for the lifestyle you want, and then (as others above have suggested) do music for the pure joy of it.

If you're thinking...."F#@% that old bastard, he doesn't know #@%#, and I'm doing what I love NO MATTER WHAT!!!!!!!" - then go ahead and give it your best shot. It will take that kind of attitude to make any degree of penetration into a biz that is hopelessly lost and completely over saturated.

The odds are tremendously against you making any real money at it, but if you won't take no for an answer and you have a drive that won't stop, and if you're truly talented (not in your own eyes, your friends eyes or your parents eyes, but in the eyes of the public and those who would hire you....) then go for it. It's and honest to God real "job" (with all the joys and grief that all jobs entail) and somebody's got to do it.

But be aware of the statistics and prepare to pay your dues for a decade or two,,,, Good luck, and for God's sake....have some fun.

Don't worry about "career's". Music is a lifestyle, not a career.
Old 9th March 2014
  #24
Lives for gear
 

The good doctor above brought up something not mentioned yet, and the most important, non negotiable question.

Do you live in NYC, Nashville, or LA?


If not, either get on a bus or find a real job. Those are the only places you will find a career as a producer. That will start with a job running for coffee, if your lucky.
Old 9th March 2014
  #25
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Igotsoul4u's Avatar
I think the key is to have something to fall back on. There is nothing worse then digging your self into a hole with no way to get out. I would try to find a college degree that will work in a musical and non-musical situation. The music biz will still be there when you are done school. Advertising, business, software engineering, education, and who knows what else. When you find yourself 15 years down the road and you can't take the financial instability, insane hours, insane people, etc...you can more or less flip the situation and search for a "normal" job. Going back to school may not be an option down the road. It will certainly be more expensive. Don't waste your money on engineering school because you could be all the gear you need to learn on your own with the same amount of money. Do a double degree or minor in music. There is nothing wrong with pursuing a dream, but as you get older there is a good chance you may find other things more important then making music as a job. That's the cool part about music, you can do it for fun for your entire life. For me music is more fun when its done simply for the sake of making music.
Old 9th March 2014
  #26
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lestermagneto's Avatar
Do what you love. But as eloquently put by drBill, you have to legitimately understand there is essentially less then 3% chance of having a sustained life worth living. And yes, we may be curmudgeonly, and have been through the ringer, but it is different now then it was 20 years ago, where people actually paid for music etc., … unless you know a lot of famous people, who feel compelled to bankroll you ,or give you jobs, or you are as "great" as you say you are, and have an in with "insert x popular artist now"… I honestly would advise getting an education and pursuing it with all hopes…
And I certainly don't mean to dash hopes, not at all, if you love music, godbless, I was your age at one point, and had many distractions, but had an opportunity to go to one of the top 5 colleges in the united states, and pushed myself, and graduated magna cum laude in three years, (in frigging philosophy of all things), feeling the same urgency you are right now to get out there….and after that, career paths opened up, with both music, and the people i met, and the friendships i made. Lord knows if I knew what I know then I wouldn't have been so stubborn to produce music outside of my sheer passion for it… I have seen years where I have sold over a million records, and I have seen years where I am paying to do it. Also consider if you want to have a family etc… It's really difficult. Either you are gone a lot of the time, or you are trying to figure out how to dance around finances…

If you love music, there is nothing more rewarding ever then writing something you feel and believe in and have it be recognized without you having to sacrifice your soul to do so… Nothing better. But more often then not, it doesn't happen. If my child told me he/she wanted to do what I do, I would do my best to point him/her in another direction in terms of mental/financial/family/sanity concerns…

None of my debbie downer **** should discourage you from doing what you love or pursuing music, … I just believe that you can pursue education on many levels, and continue your pursuit of music without putting all your eggs in one basket, so to speak… and honestly, the discipline you get from studying physics or russian literature or whatnot will all find their place in what you do musically… Train you mind, and do what you love, …. unfortunately what you love is a long difficult road without any kind of assurance.

but i never regret going to university/college,… and without it i wouldn't have made the friends and connections i have now in order to do what i do… and the one thing you will never regret is learning.

just don't get too caught up in the frivolity of fratboy crap and ****shows, and spend your time thinking about what you have to say to the world, and learning and understanding the means and ways of doing so….
Old 10th March 2014
  #27
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Im usually a Read only type of person but due to the lack of diverse answers i had to make an account just to reply.

PLEASE do not take what joeq, vintagelove, and drbill are saying to the heart. Some of what they are saying is true but they're directions are extremely one-way only, which is very close minded advise from them. They are over generalizing you and prematurely placing you in the percentage of people who are unsuccessful in the business. ABSOLUTELY NOBODY CAN TELL THE AMOUNT OF CHARACTER,WILL, DETERMINATION, AND PASSION THAT A PERSON HAS THROUGH A SINGLE POST ON GEARSLUTS. So with that in mind ill try not to treat you like another stat.

Here's a list of things you should consider:
1. is this my TRUE Passion in life.
2. #1

IF money wasnt an object, what would you wake up and do? If you dont see yourself doing this for little or no money then take a step back and try to find another answer to number one. I hate to sound cliche but tomorrow is never promised today, so dont spend your youth away chasing a edcation you dont want, just to get a job you dont want, and live a life you deeply regret. If you really want to talk about fractions and percentages, just look up the amount of people who are unsatisfied with they're jobs and in turn they're daily life. Remember that money is just a tool for comfort-ability and not a source for happiness. The fact that you are asking yourself these questions as a junior in high school means that you have a good head on your shoulders, so what ever you decide to do, dont let it go to waste.

My specific advise would be to search for internships or any opportunity to shadow or work in the industry enviornment. Just to make sure that this is exactly what you want to do in life. Explore ALL the possible work opportunities within the sound technology field, because like some of these guys said producing may just be a side thing at first and not your main bread and butter. BUT that doesnt mean you cant enjoy yourself working as an AV specialist (for example) in the mean time. Then find a sound technology school and GO. A school enviornment is going to give you WAAAAAY more opportunities and far better STRUCTURE than just youtubing tutorials all day. And there are some school opportunities that are faaarrrrr less expensive and in my opinion better than full sail. Take FIRST.edu for example. By the way that's the school that i currently attend, and its becoming known as a full sail killer down here in orlando. There are PLENTY of full sail switch over's in my graduating class alone.

With that being said, being successful in anything is going to take ALOT of work. And thats work that you got to look forward to. But Dont wake up old one day and wonder why does life suck, join a forum, and shoot down dreams. For all we know, you could be the next big thing. I really hope you read this, and if you dont i hope that anybody else who is thinking the same thing reads this.
Old 10th March 2014
  #28
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JrChery View Post
Im usually a Read only type of person but due to the lack of diverse answers i had to make an account just to reply.

PLEASE do not take what joeq, vintagelove, and drbill are saying to the heart. Some of what they are saying is true but they're directions are extremely one-way only, which is very close minded advise from them. They are over generalizing you and prematurely placing you in the percentage of people who are unsuccessful in the business. ABSOLUTELY NOBODY CAN TELL THE AMOUNT OF CHARACTER,WILL, DETERMINATION, AND PASSION THAT A PERSON HAS THROUGH A SINGLE POST ON GEARSLUTS. So with that in mind ill try not to treat you like another stat.

Here's a list of things you should consider:
1. is this my TRUE Passion in life.
2. #1

IF money wasnt an object, what would you wake up and do? If you dont see yourself doing this for little or no money then take a step back and try to find another answer to number one. I hate to sound cliche but tomorrow is never promised today, so dont spend your youth away chasing a edcation you dont want, just to get a job you dont want, and live a life you deeply regret. If you really want to talk about fractions and percentages, just look up the amount of people who are unsatisfied with they're jobs and in turn they're daily life. Remember that money is just a tool for comfort-ability and not a source for happiness. The fact that you are asking yourself these questions as a junior in high school means that you have a good head on your shoulders, so what ever you decide to do, dont let it go to waste.

My specific advise would be to search for internships or any opportunity to shadow or work in the industry enviornment. Just to make sure that this is exactly what you want to do in life. Explore ALL the possible work opportunities within the sound technology field, because like some of these guys said producing may just be a side thing at first and not your main bread and butter. BUT that doesnt mean you cant enjoy yourself working as an AV specialist (for example) in the mean time. Then find a sound technology school and GO. A school enviornment is going to give you WAAAAAY more opportunities and far better STRUCTURE than just youtubing tutorials all day. And there are some school opportunities that are faaarrrrr less expensive and in my opinion better than full sail. Take Audio Engineering & Music Production | Film & Video Production | F.I.R.S.T. Institute for example. By the way that's the school that i currently attend, and its becoming known as a full sail killer down here in orlando. There are PLENTY of full sail switch over's in my graduating class alone.

With that being said, being successful in anything is going to take ALOT of work. And thats work that you got to look forward to. But Dont wake up old one day and wonder why does life suck, join a forum, and shoot down dreams. For all we know, you could be the next big thing. I really hope you read this, and if you dont i hope that anybody else who is thinking the same thing reads this.
absolutely love this post. And completely agree with what you said about getting a boring education and a job you don't like and living life like that. My dad is responding to this the same way most of the people in the thread are he says "its a waste of time why don't you come back home and work rigs or on the farm or something and be making 200k a year by the time your 40" I just respond in the same way everytime to him. This isn't about the money, and the idea of even PLANNING to live the life he wants me to live makes me cringe, and that's only THINKING about doing what he wants me to do for the rest of my life. My absolute definition of hell would be getting sucked into a life that I don't want to be in, regardless of the compensation. Id rather try and be successful at this for 10 years before I get a break then live day by day counting the hours until im done work and just having to go back again the next day.

This isn't my first path in life, I have worked sooo many different jobs from oil rigs to bartending in night clubs. Givin bartending was fun, that's not something I want to do forever, and working rigs in Saskatchewan SURE AS HELL isn't. Going back to that life WILLINGLY knowing how it makes me feel every day would be slow suicide. With all that being said, you're a junior in high school. Give it some time, don't go to post secondary right after highschool IF you have time to think things over, people tend to jump right into college after highschool and don't even know how much their mind can change, mine sure has over the years. My whole life I have wanted to do something along the lines of music and audio engineering, and if I would have jumped into school right after highschool for what I wanted to do back then, I wouldn't be here right now. Id probably be working in some office in Saskatchewan for the rest of my life still thinking about doing this. Sooo, just play it by ear for now and see where it takes you. This isn't something that you need to commit to right now at your age, just do as a hobby and wing it.
Old 11th March 2014
  #29
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JrChery View Post
Im usually a Read only type of person but due to the lack of diverse answers i had to make an account just to reply.

PLEASE do not take what joeq, vintagelove, and drbill are saying to the heart. Some of what they are saying is true but they're directions are extremely one-way only, which is very close minded advise from them. They are over generalizing you and prematurely placing you in the percentage of people who are unsuccessful in the business. ABSOLUTELY NOBODY CAN TELL THE AMOUNT OF CHARACTER,WILL, DETERMINATION, AND PASSION THAT A PERSON HAS THROUGH A SINGLE POST ON GEARSLUTS. So with that in mind ill try not to treat you like another stat.

I never said the OP did not have 'character will determination and passion'. What I said was that being a Music Producer is not a "career". There is a big difference, and until he understands the difference, the OP will be making major life choices based on a fantasy. Those "3%" percentages are real. Where the OP belongs in those percentages is for him (and Life) to decide. But to put it in perspective, playing Russian Roulette with 5 bullets in the chamber gives you 16%.

Do you need 'character will determination and passion' to make it in music? Absolutely. Is 'character will determination and passion' enough to guarantee you will make it music? Absolutely not. Nor is talent, skill, artistry or good looks a guarantor of success in a business where success is often determined by a fickle public, an exploitative managerial class, and insider networks. Is that Fair? No. Is that Real? Yes.


Quote:
and live a life you deeply regret.
Regret lives on BOTH sides of the decision!
the OP needs to consider the possibility that what he may regret is never buying a new car, owning a house, having a wife and family. Putting his kids through college.

That utter lack of guarantees to get to these attainable-by-almost-everyone-else goals is why it is not called a "career". If he is STILL ready to go for it, ready to give up a comfortable, normal life, that should be an informed choice. That's all.


Quote:
But Dont wake up old one day and wonder why does life suck, join a forum, and shoot down dreams.
I assume you are referring to me here, but I assure I DID NOT get a normal education and a normal job. My life does not suck. I am not 'shooting down dreams'. I work in the studio every day. I am living that 'dream'.

But I gave up A LOT to get there. More than most people would think was 'worth it'. And like dr bill, I came up in a time when people still paid for music. Hint: PEOPLE DON'T PAY FOR MUSIC ANYMORE. Something to think about when it's 2014 and you are considering a "career" making something that everybody just steals nowadays.

The OP should carefully consider what he wants now and also what he will want in the future.
Old 11th March 2014
  #30
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
I never said the OP did not have 'character will determination and passion'. What I said was that being a Music Producer is not a "career". There is a big difference, and until he understands the difference, the OP will be making major life choices based on a fantasy. Those "3%" percentages are real. Where the OP belongs in those percentages is for him (and Life) to decide. But to put it in perspective, playing Russian Roulette with 5 bullets in the chamber gives you 16%.

Do you need 'character will determination and passion' to make it in music? Absolutely. Is 'character will determination and passion' enough to guarantee you will make it music? Absolutely not. Nor is talent, skill, artistry or good looks a guarantor of success in a business where success is often determined by a fickle public, an exploitative managerial class, and insider networks. Is that Fair? No. Is that Real? Yes.



Regret lives on BOTH sides of the decision!
the OP needs to consider the possibility that what he may regret is never buying a new car, owning a house, having a wife and family. Putting his kids through college.

That utter lack of guarantees to get to these attainable-by-almost-everyone-else goals is why it is not called a "career". If he is STILL ready to go for it, ready to give up a comfortable, normal life, that should be an informed choice. That's all.



I assume you are referring to me here, but I assure I DID NOT get a normal education and a normal job. My life does not suck. I am not 'shooting down dreams'. I work in the studio every day. I am living that 'dream'.

But I gave up A LOT to get there. More than most people would think was 'worth it'. And like dr bill, I came up in a time when people still paid for music. Hint: PEOPLE DON'T PAY FOR MUSIC ANYMORE. Something to think about when it's 2014 and you are considering a "career" making something that everybody just steals nowadays.

The OP should carefully consider what he wants now and also what he will want in the future.
That deeply regret phrase you quoted from me was out of context..I wasn't really talkin about OP I was just trying to give him my viewpoint of it and what I am thinking about myself.

And for my next point, it was something that was running through my head today, more asking your opinion on it than trying to start a debate. But ive been reading a lot on here about how most of the people who are big and have made it came up in a time when people paid for music. But remember, this was also a time when communication and access to information or the ability to get your work into the public wasn't even CLOSE to comparable to what it is today. Producers coming up today have the internet at their fingertips. The ability to learn more and get their work out there is astronomical compared to in the 80s/90s. So though the money may not be as good, the chance of 'getting your break' is a lot higher now in my opinion. Surprised I don't see that argument more actually. Im basing that off nothing by the way that's just what I think. Id love to hear some older more experienced guys opinions on what I just said.
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