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Why won't drummers use electronic kit live?
Old 23rd October 2013
  #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumbo View Post
May I ask for all your opinions.... Does an acoustic drum kit where 95% of the sound is coming off stage with very little eq! compression and fx treatment and virtually nothing coming from FOH sound anything like a recorded kit mixed with the rest of the band a listener may find on modern recordings?

If yes, my point is mute... If the sound is widely different, then in my opinion my point stands.... That all instrumentation in a live setting has adapted to give the audience a sound that somewhat resembles what modern production on recordings is all about.... And that acoustic drums is the only instrument that is much harder to tame unless it is electronic..

I know that there are some really talented sound engineers that can make it happen and do wonders, but with humble budgets, that ain't gonna happen.
The problem is that for some reason you think that a live gig/concert should sound like a recording.It shouldn't.Its live.If they want to buy the record...its for sale but they came to see people play live.Its exiting,its fun,its not a f***g recording.
You shoud just fake everything on stage and have a DJ behind the curtain if that's your aim or better yet,just play the CD.
And by the way,a well tuned kit (FOR LIVE PLAY) played by a good sensible drummer sounds fantastic.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumbo View Post
Thanks guys for your input. It's not so much how inept the drummer is, as he is a very good, experienced muso.... But more what the audience expects. I'll recap, it's a 60's show, Tom jones, engelbert Humperdinck type music that attracts... You guessed it, old timers. They expect the full gamut of string arrangements, brass sections.... That's what they want to hear, and of course the vocals is most important, and they couldn't care less about drums...and the music has to all be played at a comfortable volume as old people cannot tolerate high levels of noise.
I think as musicians, we have come accustomed to play for ourselves rather than what the audience wants... Audience ears are changing, they hear recorded music that is quantized and bright, and if your band plays without a click.... For today's audiences, It sounds too loose. Likewise, drum kits on stage particularly in a small venue where it is not tamed sound nothing like a drum kit on a modern recording.... Once a casual listener experiences a live drum kit for the first time in a long time, remember their ears are accustomed to what they hear on iPods, and the live drum kit all of a sudden sounds way too dynamic, muddy, and dominates, and to those listeners... It sux, which then means your band sux.

To further demonstrate my point, one of my band members works on the show Australian X factor as a musical director, and for their live shows all drum tracks and allot of instrumentation is pre programmed! and the only live instruments would be a piano or a guitar. Why? Because that's the sound modern listeners are used to, one that is eq'd, compressed, and in balance. Live music audiences are no different.

Feel free to flame me, but keep in mind the music we play May be totally different to what your used to. We play ticketed events, of old classics where melody, vocals, harmony and a more orchestral sound should dominate. Just saying, these days, if it sounds nothing like the cd, in the eyes and ears of the audience.... You suck
Drummer's at fault. Sorry. It's all about the dynamics and control (and kit choices). Same reason why "amazing" live drummers do not necessarily translate into "amazing" studio drummers.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #63
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compared to a real properly tuned kit they sound and feel like ****.

also get a drummer who can actually "play" the drums...ie actually play with the band using proper dynamics/balance.
worked for all the jazz guys all these years.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #64
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I dunno, I go to a show specifically to NOT hear modern production or sequencing. I feel cheated when the string section IS there and there's nobody playing it. I want to see and hear the energy off the stage and a sound guy that mixes the band well. Bonus points if their keyboard weighs 420 pounds. Maybe I'm not a typical listener.

I play with a drummer that can be super-quiet. He has so many sticks, moon gel, brushes. One of the few drummers that I can stand beside with my upright bass, play acoustically, and hear myself. We play older vocal jazz, real drums with brushes 'sounds right'.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavern View Post
The problem is that for some reason you think that a live gig/concert should sound like a recording.It shouldn't.Its live.If they want to buy the record...its for sale but they came to see people play live.Its exiting,its fun,its not a f***g recording.
You shoud just fake everything on stage and have a DJ behind the curtain if that's your aim or better yet,just play the CD.
And by the way,a well tuned kit (FOR LIVE PLAY) played by a good sensible drummer sounds fantastic.
Yes, I totally understand and agree... and this is the view typically from a musician or a purist. I'm talking about the average audience expectations, not musician expectations. I too love to hear a good live band playing, and for what is an impossibility of replicating on stage (such as string sections and brass sections in some instances), a good band can change the vibe and arrangement to make it something else. however, todays average audience has different expectations, and the purists among them are very few.

It's come to a point that bands that play without a click start sounding loose and sloppy to the modern audience. That's because they are used to hearing everything quantized. There are Exceptions to the rule always, if your doing obscure stuff, however, anything that involves a general audience and popular music from past and present.... there is a general expectation from the audience.
At least this is the expectation in the world I live in, and may not be what you guys are experiencing.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumbo View Post
It's come to a point that bands that play without a click start sounding loose and sloppy to the modern audience. That's because they are used to hearing everything quantized. There are Exceptions to the rule always, if your doing obscure stuff, however, anything that involves a general audience and popular music from past and present.... there is a general expectation from the audience.
At least this is the expectation in the world I live in, and may not be what you guys are experiencing.
The Black Keys are a very very popular band.
they do NOT play to a click track.
that gives me hope that in the future not everyone will play locked to a machine.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #67
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I cant stand it when I walk into a club and see an electronic kit with a rock band..looks dorky and sounds fake.
always makes me barf in my mouth a little bit lol.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #68
It doesn't sound like he cares what anyone says just looking to back up his view. It would really suck to be in a band like that. It's bad enough when people are doing that crap in the studio.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #69
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Yeah, ya know, a big part of playing live is the musicians being able to balance themselves and sound like a band, and for larger gigs, for the FOH eng. to maintain and reinforce that balance.
It's nice if it can "sound like a record", but what makes live music special is that it is being performed right there in front of you, and you are part of the experience in real time. It's happening live.
A good mix on a big system is always impressive, but it is really only half as good as being right up close to a great band in a more intimate space with way less P.A., and being able to hear the balance that the musicians create among themselves, and the way the instruments, amps, and drums actually sound, right at the source, and not just the reinforced amplification of it. IMHO.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #70
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A real kit---500 ways to hit the snare and 500 different sounds come out of it.
electronic kit--- every hit sounds the same but at different volumes.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #71
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I've had to ask a drummer to bring his electronic kit just once, it was a rock gig in a weird modern church with a truly nightmare-ish RT60. But otherwise, I just agree that if it's too loud, you're not playing to the room. The ultimate proof is when you do sound in some small indoor rock or metal festival and have every drummer play the same kit. Some of them will sound awful and be a pain for the sound guy, but others will sound just fine and kind of "mix themselves".

Sent from TapaTalk
Old 23rd October 2013
  #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KRStudio View Post
A real kit---500 ways to hit the snare and 500 different sounds come out of it.
electronic kit--- every hit sounds the same but at different volumes.
Not necessarily.

Most of the decent sample packs / libraries have multi-sampled velocities, meaning they are much more realistic in variation as akin to a real drum.
They do cost more though, and ime, with recording, can often take some post tweaking messing to get the velocities closer together in terms of range.

I'm still for acoustic kits, but edrums do have their place. They are sort of like triggers really, but without the acoustic part.....well, for metal genres anyways :-)
Old 23rd October 2013
  #73
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"Of course they're loud! They're drums!!"

thankyou Buddy Rich
Old 23rd October 2013
  #74
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hi, i think it's the fact that real drums move air, you FEEL them as well as hear them, they get your head nodding. As well as they may be played by a drummer the electronic kit just doesn't have the dynamics of a real kit. It doesn't move the air around you like actually hitting the tubs does. If it's coming through monitors, you hear it as if it should sound but you can't feel the vibrations close to you. Just my 2 cents worth.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #75
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Format C: yes's Avatar
 

Things most of us agree upon.
Ecymbals are rubbish.
edrum's don't look as good.
A real kit with a good drummer in a great sounding room miked up and being looked after by a good engineer with a lot of gear is the best sound.
I don't think to many would argue with the above.

Here's the disconnect.
edrums excluding the cymbals sound better thru the mains than a real kit not thru or partially thru the mains this is a subjective statement so we are going to get a difference of opinion and no one is right or wrong.
edrums give the audience a more recorded type sound with way better level control from the engineer for better or worse. My position is this is where edrums shine an independent person who has a whole of band approach decides how loud each element is not relying on a member to "play" to the room. Also the total volume can be set for the size of the venue number of people and what the "boss" (guy paying the bill) wants
edrums arnt as much fun to play mite be true but they are more fun to play along side. Real drums create a who can be loudest war with noone the winner.

I love our edrum setup so does our drummer altho it took some convincing he owns a real kit but there is no way he would go back and most important so do the people who come and watch us play.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #76
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"Why won't drummers use electronic kit live?"

I love the sound and power of a great drummer on a great kit. The sound of the drums can make or break the sound of a live band.

A very good friend of mine was in a band that recently broke up for a long time, I think about 8 years. In the beginning the drummer played an electronic kit. Great drummer, but made the whole thing sound like crap. And I told him so, but it was many years into it before the drummer finally went to an acoustic kit. Everyone said the sound of the band improved 100 fold after that.

So i.m.o., the answer to your question is because they sound like crap. And even more so if it is a loud band. Actually quite painful. Can you imagine Led Zeppelin cranked up in a stadium with Bonham on an electronic kit?
Old 23rd October 2013
  #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
"Why won't drummers use electronic kit live?"
Can you imagine Led Zeppelin cranked up in a stadium with Bonham on an electronic kit?
Actually a lot of big live acts now use triggers which is basically turning your real kit into a edrum from the audience perspective. We tryed triggers and they work great but in a small venue you can only turn the drums down so much..
Old 23rd October 2013
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumbo View Post
Yes, I totally understand and agree... and this is the view typically from a musician or a purist. I'm talking about the average audience expectations, not musician expectations. I too love to hear a good live band playing, and for what is an impossibility of replicating on stage (such as string sections and brass sections in some instances), a good band can change the vibe and arrangement to make it something else. however, todays average audience has different expectations, and the purists among them are very few.

It's come to a point that bands that play without a click start sounding loose and sloppy to the modern audience. That's because they are used to hearing everything quantized. There are Exceptions to the rule always, if your doing obscure stuff, however, anything that involves a general audience and popular music from past and present.... there is a general expectation from the audience.
At least this is the expectation in the world I live in, and may not be what you guys are experiencing.
I guess that's my point.A good drummer can keep time well enough live that the audience would not know if hes clicked or not.Of course the rest of the band has to be able to keep time too.Its like the defencemen in hockey leaving the goal tender hanging out to dry and blaming him for the goal.
I've heard cover bands for instance, In lounges and such that did motown sets or supertramp,jazz,whatever and they were just spot on.You could have recorded it right there.I bet the audience in,like you say"the world i live in" would have loved it and accepted it.They were good players.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Format C: yes View Post
Things most of us agree upon.
Ecymbals are rubbish.
edrum's don't look as good.
A real kit with a good drummer in a great sounding room miked up and being looked after by a good engineer with a lot of gear is the best sound.
I don't think to many would argue with the above.

Here's the disconnect.
edrums excluding the cymbals sound better thru the mains than a real kit not thru or partially thru the mains this is a subjective statement so we are going to get a difference of opinion and no one is right or wrong.
edrums give the audience a more recorded type sound with way better level control from the engineer for better or worse. My position is this is where edrums shine an independent person who has a whole of band approach decides how loud each element is not relying on a member to "play" to the room. Also the total volume can be set for the size of the venue number of people and what the "boss" (guy paying the bill) wants
edrums arnt as much fun to play mite be true but they are more fun to play along side. Real drums create a who can be loudest war with noone the winner.

I love our edrum setup so does our drummer altho it took some convincing he owns a real kit but there is no way he would go back and most important so do the people who come and watch us play.
I totally agree with this statement 100%. I understand also that edrums aren't as good as the real thing, but have their place, and in my situation I think it would be ideal. Heck, When the electric guitar first came out, it also had harsh criticism as being nothing but a fad, and had nothing to do with the tone of a "real guitar"... and obviously that sentiment changed. Will edrums become the future standard stage drums??
Old 23rd October 2013
  #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Format C: yes View Post
Actually a lot of big live acts now use triggers which is basically turning your real kit into a edrum from the audience perspective. We tryed triggers and they work great but in a small venue you can only turn the drums down so much..

Ok, here is Zep in a very small venue. I'm sorry, but edrums would just not have cut it.

Old 23rd October 2013
  #81
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Edrums are convenient, real drums sound good. Pick one.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
Ok, here is Zep in a very small venue. I'm sorry, but edrums would just not have cut it.

How dare you interject reality into this fantasy.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumbo View Post
Thanks guys for your input. It's not so much how inept the drummer is, as he is a very good, experienced muso.... But more what the audience expects. I'll recap, it's a 60's show, Tom jones, engelbert Humperdinck type music that attracts... You guessed it, old timers. They expect the full gamut of string arrangements, brass sections.... That's what they want to hear, and of course the vocals is most important, and they couldn't care less about drums...and the music has to all be played at a comfortable volume as old people cannot tolerate high levels of noise.
There is nothing about having fake brass and fake strings that requires you to also have fake drums. And if any part of your drum sound is miked through the PA, any "too loud" problem can be solved with a knob. If your drums are acoustically "too loud" for a 200-seat venue, give your drummer smaller sticks and take him OFF the steroids.

Playing to prerecorded backing tracks and clicks makes your "performance" less and less of live experience. At a certain point, you might as well dispense with the drummer altogether. Seriously, why the hell not? You have already dispensed with a horn section and the string players! Get rid of him and the guitar, keyboard and bass as while you are at it. A singer, a CD and some lights. For this "audience" you seem to have identified, what else do you need?

You are already dumbing down the live show for people who, by your assessment, don't care about anything except the vocals and that it is not "too loud". They also seem to be undisturbed by the fact that it is Obviously physically impossible for the fully orchestrated sound they are hearing to be coming from only four people. If they will accept that, they will accept the fact that it is coming from 'nobody'.

So why not simply cut it down to the singer and a tape? Answer this question!

If any of your reasons for not doing so involve words like: "excitement" or: "impact" or "energy" or "theatricality" or "SHOW", then you are just making the case for a live acoustic drumset!

Quote:
I think as musicians, we have come accustomed to play for ourselves rather than what the audience wants...
This reminds me that I have met a lot of control-freak bandleaders who back up whatever THEY want by saying "the audience" wants it. IME, audiences do not want pablum. They do not really want a "recording" coming from the stage. They want a SHOW!


Quote:
the live drum kit all of a sudden sounds way too dynamic, muddy, and dominates
Muddy? The real kit sounds MUDDY compared to the electronic kit??? No way! More dynamic? sure, but that should be in the control of the drummer. Muddy?


Quote:
...Australian X factor... all drum tracks and allot of instrumentation is pre programmed! and the only live instruments would be a piano or a guitar. Why? Because that's the sound modern listeners are used to
no that's not why. Plenty of TV shows have live music that is mixed wonderfully. They program everything because they are scared. Pre-recording everything a 'safety' issue. And a money issue - they save on a band and on rehearsals. They are wimps and cheapskates. If this is what you "aspire" to, why not do what they do? A completely prerecorded drum track will provide you with exactly that compressed, EQ'd, "perfect" CD sound that you believe your audience "expects" and will be "unhappy if they don't get". Plus of course you eliminate any possibility of mistakes.

And let's face it, one less way to split the money!

Quote:
Live music audiences are no different.
IMO, live music audiences are different. Even your audience of old fogies. Otherwise they would literally stay home and listen to the CD. Also, people who complain about everything, will complain about volume first and you will notice them. Squeaky wheels. Nobody will come up to you and say: "hey the volume was just right". The Silent Majority.


Quote:
Feel free to flame me
taking you at your word!

Quote:
Just saying, these days, if it sounds nothing like the cd, in the eyes and ears of the audience.... You suck
The logical conclusion, as I said above, is to just play them a CD. "Problem" solved.

For my own part, even when I was playing in a band that catered to an older crowd, I always aspired to get somewhere beyond "not sucking".
Old 23rd October 2013
  #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
Ok, here is Zep in a very small venue. I'm sorry, but edrums would just not have cut it.

bonzo wow

Why is it, that no drummer on planet Earth is capable of playing like this guy? it's so simple but yet epic. No one is even close to that feel. Drummers just don't get it, it's bizarre. They have had 45 years to study him and they all fail. anyhooo

But OT.... I honestly think bonzo would sound good on anything real or electronic.

Electronic drums can be very effective in the right hands. They don't replace acoustic drums like an electric guitar flooded in fx pedals does not replace an acoustic guitar, or a guitar synth does not replace an standard electric guitar, but it comes down to the situation.

I saw this incredible acoustic band a couple times and the drummer played electronics. He had a certain way with them. It just worked. I wouldn't resort to that cliche' that: "if you can't make electronic drums sound good you are not a good drummer", but some guys just have a knack for making sh|t sound good, and some don't. The thing was he controlled the volume in very small venues where intimacy was a must. I'm sure he could have used a real kit but it didn't matter it just sounded great regardless. He used it as a melodic instrument not as a tree stump for typical mindless drummer pounding.

It's all about musicality. Being musical has nothing to do with the equipment it has to do with the approach and the feel and being complementary and providing a contextual texture. See 99% of all drummers are not musical, they are bashers, so naturally they are not going to make electronic drums sound good since they are missing the musical aspect in their lives. They don't get it. See bonzo was musical first and foremost. He was as melodic as he was percussive. Hence why most drummers are jealous of him and listen to Jeff Pacorro and Dave weklle instead.

Kieth Emerson and wakeman made synths sound good. Geddy made Taurus pedals sound good. Guys like fripp and the Maiden guys did amazing things with guitar synths, it's situational. But at the end of the day if you are not a good drummer you will fail at electronics. So in a way it does come down to talent.

Same holds true for engineers. If you can't make an electronic kit sound good in the studio, hand the job over to a professional, they will succeed; because they understand musicality and are not living in the dark ages and have no fear of taking changes and exploring new and visionary musical approaches.

An electronic kit is not going to work in all scenarios but it surely has a purpose in the right hands and right situations.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbsteho View Post
as drummer, playing on a E kit is boring.
no sensations at all, just a toy. or a tool sometimes

nothing beats the sensation of real dums, even hit softly
having the rigth balance and the good kit in small venue is part of drummer's job
Perhaps it's because a real drum offers so much more in sound and feel compared to an edrum than a keyboard compared to a piano? I like hitting the heads with varying dynamic at different positions to get different sounds. The variation possibilities are just so great I'm not sure an edrum can deliver that.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #86
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I gig twice a week all year round. My band practices at least once a week too. I think we tried practicing with our electronic kit once. It was horrible. Especially for a band like us doing blues, soul, funk etc - you really rely on dynamics, and although this technology is improving, as are the quality of the samples, using a real kit is just real - an electronic one is just not.

Also, a lot of gigs we play are in small bars and clubs. We don't need to mic up the acoustic kit at all. Why go to the bother of having to EQ the kit through the P.A, which is in turn also taking up the vocal's room. Just tune the kit nicely, and hear it breath and work as one with the drummers playing dynamics.

The only place I can imagine an electronic kit being placed is in some kind of very formal or corporate 'controlled' events that require awful, very tame background music. At which stage, you wonder if it'd be just better someone put a CD on.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
There is nothing about having fake brass and fake strings that requires you to also have fake drums. And if any part of your drum sound is miked through the PA, any "too loud" problem can be solved with a knob. If your drums are acoustically "too loud" for a 200-seat venue, give your drummer smaller sticks and take him OFF the steroids.

Playing to prerecorded backing tracks and clicks makes your "performance" less and less of live experience. At a certain point, you might as well dispense with the drummer altogether. Seriously, why the hell not? You have already dispensed with a horn section and the string players! Get rid of him and the guitar, keyboard and bass as while you are at it. A singer, a CD and some lights. For this "audience" you seem to have identified, what else do you need?

You are already dumbing down the live show for people who, by your assessment, don't care about anything except the vocals and that it is not "too loud". They also seem to be undisturbed by the fact that it is Obviously physically impossible for the fully orchestrated sound they are hearing to be coming from only four people. If they will accept that, they will accept the fact that it is coming from 'nobody'.

So why not simply cut it down to the singer and a tape? Answer this question!

If any of your reasons for not doing so involve words like: "excitement" or: "impact" or "energy" or "theatricality" or "SHOW", then you are just making the case for a live acoustic drumset!



This reminds me that I have met a lot of control-freak bandleaders who back up whatever THEY want by saying "the audience" wants it. IME, audiences do not want pablum. They do not really want a "recording" coming from the stage. They want a SHOW!



Muddy? The real kit sounds MUDDY compared to the electronic kit??? No way! More dynamic? sure, but that should be in the control of the drummer. Muddy?




no that's not why. Plenty of TV shows have live music that is mixed wonderfully. They program everything because they are scared. Pre-recording everything a 'safety' issue. And a money issue - they save on a band and on rehearsals. They are wimps and cheapskates. If this is what you "aspire" to, why not do what they do? A completely prerecorded drum track will provide you with exactly that compressed, EQ'd, "perfect" CD sound that you believe your audience "expects" and will be "unhappy if they don't get". Plus of course you eliminate any possibility of mistakes.

And let's face it, one less way to split the money!


IMO, live music audiences are different. Even your audience of old fogies. Otherwise they would literally stay home and listen to the CD. Also, people who complain about everything, will complain about volume first and you will notice them. Squeaky wheels. Nobody will come up to you and say: "hey the volume was just right". The Silent Majority.



taking you at your word!



The logical conclusion, as I said above, is to just play them a CD. "Problem" solved.

For my own part, even when I was playing in a band that catered to an older crowd, I always aspired to get somewhere beyond "not sucking".
Quite honestly, to answer your question.... I would quite happily replace the drummer, bass player and everybody and maybe just keep the trusted guitarist if I could... One or two less headaches to worry about, and put up with. I'm 36 and have been performing since 15, and in that time I've found the bigger the band, the more problems arise and get in the way. Gotta deal with different personalities, different problems, different levels of reliability....I'm over it. The definition of what qualifies to be considered a band has changed.... It no longer needs to be a typical 5 piece. We need to get over what we define as a band....

For example, I also have been playing in a successful wedding/ corporate 3 piece band for last 8 yrs and we are dominant in the corporate/wedding market within our community.... we play at least once a week if not twice.
Now get this, the keyboardist plays an arranger keyboard, all drums, bass and other instrumentation comes from his Korg arranger keyboard. We have a great guitarist, I sing and play piano at times, they also provide 3 part harmonies. No drummer or drum kit in sight, or bassist. And we play everything from rock, pop, dance, RNB etc on our own Kick ass PA costing almost $20k which we run ourselves...no sound man. Not once, ever, has the client complained "where is your drummer, or bassist", or refused to pay us because of our lack of drummer or bassist.. And we typically charge what many 5 piece corporate bands charge.

Also, wedding receptions these days are very un accommodating for bands, and give you very minimal space which would be impossible to fit a drum kit in.
The only complaints we ever get are from long haired stuck in the eighties dudes, who most probably played in a band at high school. For that band, we don't feel the need to be cool, look cool, look like a band. We get a job done and we make money from it.

Only reason really I have a drummer for my shows is because people come in and sit down and watch. Maybe more of a spectacle thing that I feel the need for us to look like an ensemble.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #88
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Sounds Great's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by therock View Post
bonzo wow

Why is it, that no drummer on planet Earth is capable of playing like this guy? it's so simple but yet epic.
How right you are. A tiny simple drum set in front of a bunch of kids sitting on the floor. The drumming there on Dazed and Confused is just mind blowing. And as you say, it is so musical. The sounds he created there with that INSTRUMENT could not have been created with any kind of edrums, no way, no how.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumbo View Post
For example, I also have been playing in a successful wedding/ corporate 3 piece band for last 8 yrs
But you are kind of making our point for us. I'm sure you do a good job for what you do, but you could easily be replace by a DJ and attendance for these events would not drop. They aren't coming to hear a band.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sounds Great View Post
But you are kind of making our point for us. I'm sure you do a good job for what you do, but you could easily be replace by a DJ and attendance for these events would not drop. They aren't coming to hear a band.
Very true... We are all replaceable and can be obsolete in many cases. It has happened that we have played alongside a dj at a wedding, and the crowd preferred the dj, and vice versa.
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