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Guitars panned hard....
Old 15th October 2013
  #1
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Midnight Oil Audio's Avatar
 

Guitars panned hard....

Hi all, this may be a case of mixing with eyes instead of my ears, but I was finishing up a mix tonight, and I took a look at the stereo field with a plugin (which I almost never do) and I noticed that even though I had my guitars panned hard L & R, it looked like I was still getting a ton of sound up the middle. Both guitars are EQ'ed the exact same, but they ARE different parts, so this isnt a case of two identical tracks effectively getting panned to mono.

Here are some crude illustrations I made of what I was expecting to see and what I actually saw. TIA for any insight...
Attached Thumbnails
Guitars panned hard....-expectation.jpg   Guitars panned hard....-reality.jpg  
Old 15th October 2013
  #2
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It's because your sources are not completely different from each other; their frequency content still overlaps somewhat, so there are moments when the same pitches (usually in the form of harmonics) are present in both channels at the same time.
Old 15th October 2013
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Thanks for the response.

So am I correct in assuming then that a widening technique would be have the EQ's of respective hard panned parts as mirror images of each other (excluding HPF's and LPF's) ?
Old 15th October 2013
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PyneBoxx View Post
Thanks for the response.

So am I correct in assuming then that a widening technique would be have the EQ's of respective hard panned parts as mirror images of each other (excluding HPF's and LPF's) ?
That would probably make them sound even more different from each other, so it would work. I know that Tuck Andress does that (among other tricks) to "stereoize" his naturally mono electric guitar.
Old 16th October 2013
  #5
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Just a thought, you may want to alter the eq of one of those tracks just a bit in order to get more sonic separation of those tracks. Even though they are playing different parts, it sounds to me like they are still going to (dependent upon which notes/chords you play) occupy the same sonice space in your mix. Try boosting a little at a couple of points on one, then cut the other in the same places the same amount you boosted the one guitar track. I'm not talking a lot of boost maybe 1.5dB at the most. Guaranteed you'll get much more sonic separation.
Old 16th October 2013
  #6
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Are they both going through the same reverb/fx? this may be adding info from the R/L to the L/R in the form of diffusion.

One other 'width' trick with hard panned mono guitars is to bring them each up on another channel and pan them hard against the source at a lower volume and out of phase. a little bit of these opposite guitars under the main tracks can trick your ear and push the tracks outside the speakers more.

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