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Is a drum bus required? Dynamics Plugins
Old 31st August 2011
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Is a drum bus required?

Could someone briefly explain when and why a drum bus could be required?
Also, if you have any EQ settings for kick drum for rock n roll music.
Old 31st August 2011
  #2
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This type of drum bus is required if you want to do serial (series) processing of all the elements of the drums together. For example, it is often beneficial to compress the entire drum sound to "glue" it together. Depending on compressor settings, individual drum elements (Kick/snare/toms) won't "poke out" as much. You could also do stereo widening, time-based effects with a lot of wet signal (phasing/flanging), etc.

Also very useful for doing rides of the entire drum set volume or mutes. Instead of muting multiple channels of drums, you just mute the drum bus.

As far as EQ settings for kick for rock and roll...you want to hear it, and you want to feel it. To feel it you need some low end, so you could boost somewhere between 40-100Hz depending on what drum/song/player. To hear it, you may need some mid-high or high frequencies. Check out boosting from 1k-4k or 4k-8k depending on drum/beater/song/player/other instruments. Additionally...pulling out some of the cardboard box sound around 200-350Hz will help it out in many cases.
Old 31st August 2011
  #3
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ok thanks. i use audition - it's fairly simple to do a bus. the only parts giving me issues are the bass guitar and the kick. i either have too much low, or not enough.
Old 31st August 2011
  #4
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abechap024's Avatar
 

Usually pulling out the resonant frequency of the drum will help clean things up....I find around 400hz is a good starting point. Good rule of thumb, when you boost use wider curves and when you cut use thinner curves (Q).

You don't have to have a drum bus.
Old 31st August 2011
  #5
Gear Addict
 

try using high pass filters on other aspects of your mix to preserve that 25Hz - 100 Hz (roughly -- use your ears) for the bass and kick. The idea is not to cut off any sound sources so they sound different to you (or maybe that would be a good idea? Always use your ears and judgment.) . The idea I bring up as a generalized approach is to remove any low frequency content that you are not hearing on the other tracks because the small amounts will accumulate - especially if you used a whole bunch of mics on your drum kit and have a dense arrangement otherwise. Plus they will affect the way any drum buss or master buss compressors will be triggered.

Then think about the kick and bass as complimenting each other, not duplicating the same frequencies. Get them to sit nicely with each other. It will be easier to dial in if the bass and kick play together.

But to recap -- remember that those bass frequencies take up a lot of your headroom and can get muddied up over the course of many tracks, even if you don't hear them (like on the snare spot mic.) If you can keep that range off-limits to all tracks except for those you want down there it will be easier for you to control your low end.
Old 31st August 2011
  #6
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ears2thesky's Avatar
I bus the kick and bass guitar together and the rest of the drums to their own bus. That way the snare doesn't affect kick compression and the bass/kick can be eq'd and compressed in a complementary way to each other.
Old 1st September 2011
  #7
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crying1986's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ears2thesky View Post
I bus the kick and bass guitar together and the rest of the drums to their own bus. That way the snare doesn't affect kick compression and the bass/kick can be eq'd and compressed in a complementary way to each other.
Interesting...
Old 1st September 2011
  #8
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Dr. Mordo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ears2thesky View Post
I bus the kick and bass guitar together and the rest of the drums to their own bus. That way the snare doesn't affect kick compression and the bass/kick can be eq'd and compressed in a complementary way to each other.
That is interesting, indeed. I may try that.

I always buss the drums, although often I bus the overheads separately. I have pretty much quit compressing busses, period. I do eq them occasionally, but that's mostly hpf/lpf. The reason I do it is because I want to easily mute them/solo them/change the overall balance.

For that matter I always buss everything except bass guitar. It simplifies level balancing when I can mute/solo 'DRUMS', 'INST', 'LEAD VOCs', etc at will.

Busses are your friend, even if they have no fx on them at all.
Old 1st September 2011
  #9
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jdier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtyclergy View Post
Could someone briefly explain when and why a drum bus could be required?
Also, if you have any EQ settings for kick drum for rock n roll music.
Not sure if you can do this, but in Reaper it is super easy to set up a side chain compressor...

basically I have a compressor on the kick that is triggered by the bass guitar...

It help level out the combo when both are playing together and allows you to bring up the overall volume without things getting too messy.

In general it can create a feel like the kick and bass are super tight.
Old 21st September 2011
  #10
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JohnRick's Avatar
Maybe I've have missed something, but:

Do you normally take all the separate drum tracks and SEND it to a bus (return)?

Or do you route the OUTPUT on all the drum tracks to a bus?

Or both?

Or route the OUTPUT on drum tracks to a bus and make parallell compression
happen via a wet/dry knob in the very compressor?
Old 22nd September 2011
  #11
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JohnRick, I'm not sure I understand all your questions, but I think generally a buss is receiving 100% of the outputs of whatever is included in it. In Reaper, they are called folders, and it works like a folder on your computer. Mute the buss, the sub tracks mute, crank the volume on the bus, the subtracks stay at the same level relative to each other but come up relative to every track that's not in the bus. Sending tracks to parallel fx processors, like routing 6% of a vocal's output through a reverb and 40% of a snare through the same reverb, is a bit different.
Old 22nd September 2011
  #12
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JohnRick's Avatar
Thanks for the input. As a drummer I record a lot of software drums actually, but normally do not route it via buses since i can manage in the internal mixers of the plugs.

I however did some routing yesterday where I routed the output from the drums to one bus. Then I did a send from the receiving bus to a new bus where I put the compressor. So the first bus (which had the drum output routed to it) I considered to be a drumbus where I could control the gain on all the drums with one fader. Bus no2 which returns to the first bus is where i decide how much parallell compression I want to blend in to the complete drummix. Or is there a simpler way of doing this?

I'm sitting with SONAR X1 btw.
Old 23rd September 2011
  #13
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Interesting. That's a creative way of doing parallel drum compression in the box. I've never done that because in Reaper, you get an option on each plugin instance (no matter what plugin) to mix wet and dry signals.

Some plugins also come standard with this option built into their gui. I think softube's fet compressor has parallel compression. Or, a less expensive and also awesome option is voxengo's marquis compressor. But there's nothing wrong with the way you are doing it, and it's free, so...
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