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Best Mixing Books to Read?? Books
Old 11th June 2009
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Best Mixing Books to Read??

So i couldn't find an updated thread on this....

I am looking to get some good books on Mixing Techniques. There are so many out there these days...

What are the "must read" books on this subject....and are there any new books these days that are a must have??

cheers.
Old 11th June 2009
  #2
Here for the gear
 

Hey

If you go to the IDM Forums (intelligent dance music). Under the mixing/mastering section there is a Great Free Mixing guide and general EQ References. One of the best and easiest I've found so far.

Guide to Mixing

Hope this helps!
Chase-
Old 11th June 2009
  #3
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Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by evillain View Post
So i couldn't find an updated thread on this....

I am looking to get some good books on Mixing Techniques. There are so many out there these days...

What are the "must read" books on this subject....and are there any new books these days that are a must have??

cheers.
cmon guy....

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/4263572-post10.html
Old 11th June 2009
  #4
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vernier's Avatar
George Martin's "All You Need Is Ears" contains what you need. The technical books missed the point, imo.
Old 11th June 2009
  #5
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I just read Mixing Audio by Roey Izhaki and liked it a lot.
Old 11th June 2009
  #6
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Fletcher's Avatar
The Daily Adventures of Mixerman [which is now available from "Hal Leonard"]. Won't teach you how to mix any better but it's a fun read none the less.

[BTW, reading books on mixing is like reading a book on painting... you might get an interesting idea or two to try but until you actually get into the hot seat you'll still have no idea of what you're doing].

Peace.
Old 11th June 2009
  #7
Baz
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Well here's one for the assistant engineer by Tim Crich. Tim's really paid his dues from what I heard from guys that have worked with him
Old 11th June 2009
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vernier View Post
George Martin's "All You Need Is Ears" contains what you need. The technical books missed the point, imo.

if you think that technical information will hurt you, you are mistaken.

the technical info will help make you a better listener.

I find it a bit odd that the idea of reading, book-learning is frowned upon...like those who have technical ability lack listening skills?? absurd. the dangerous people are those with both book and ear-knowledge.
noone has ever suffered from knowing too much..
Old 11th June 2009
  #9
To help your mixing skills I think something like this:

Moulton Laboratories :: Golden Ears

would be a bigger help than just a book by itself. A book about mixing that comes with an audio cd that follows the book would be good. But to read about how something is supposed to sound, is like listening to someone talk about how to paint and verbally describe what the colors should look like.

Train your ears... and everything else will follow. Granted I do think books have a valid purpose...but more technical in nature. In order to mix you need to know what a compressor is and how it works, what reverb is and how it works and so on... but once you get into how to apply those tools, you need your ears, not your eyes.
Old 11th June 2009
  #10
Gear Nut
 

The only thing I would add to the list referenced above is "Behind the Glass 2" by Howard Massey (published May 15, 2009).

Keith
Old 11th June 2009
  #11
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The_Controllers's Avatar
 

^^^^ Behind the glass 2??? Woahhhh, New Tab > Amazon here I go I love that book!
Old 12th June 2009
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
To help your mixing skills I think something like this:

Moulton Laboratories :: Golden Ears
This is a great series. Pricey, but very good.

I got a few critical listening books, but they pretty much start to say the same things.

Bobby Owsinski has penned a few books on mixing and mastering. They cover many of the points that need to be covered.
Old 12th June 2009
  #13
Gear Addict
 

Found this:

Mixing Techniques

It might help a bit.

mick
Old 12th June 2009
  #14
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sub'd
Old 12th June 2009
  #15
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musicmatt's Avatar
 

The one's that tell you to get off your ass and just do it.
Old 12th June 2009
  #17
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Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by passivepeter View Post

ja...i posted that one in my list.
Old 12th June 2009
  #18
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Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmatt View Post
The one's that tell you to get off your ass and just do it.

some more amazing advice from the peanut gallery....

so weve got

"i need a compressor to warm up digital sound"

and "all XXX priced pres are going to sound bad"

now this.

classic..
Old 12th June 2009
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teddy Ray View Post
So I noticed that "Modern Recording Techniques" by Huber & Runstein isn't on your list. Is there a reason behind that? I ask because I'll be teaching a recording class at the local university next spring and have been considering that book as a general text for the class. I used an early edition of the book at L.A. Recording Workshop and don't remember having any complaints—but that was over 20 years ago, so I'm certainly not up to speed with all the current options.
Old 12th June 2009
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by seanmccoy View Post
So I noticed that "Modern Recording Techniques" by Huber & Runstein isn't on your list.

I think it's a great book, but not really a book focused on mixing, it's mostly signal flow and microphones...
Old 12th June 2009
  #21
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Teddy Ray's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seanmccoy View Post
So I noticed that "Modern Recording Techniques" by Huber & Runstein isn't on your list. Is there a reason behind that? I ask because I'll be teaching a recording class at the local university next spring and have been considering that book as a general text for the class. I used an early edition of the book at L.A. Recording Workshop and don't remember having any complaints—but that was over 20 years ago, so I'm certainly not up to speed with all the current options.

well...it isnt really a comprehensive book... primarily signal flow , things of that nature.

The Eargle Books mentioned are FAR more comprehensive.... the best out there, ever..at least in my mind. John covered it all. With the Microphone Book, Sound Recording, and Handbook of Recording Engineering...youd have an amazing text...


also..he did a series of cds called "engineers choice" and "the symphonic sound stage" that documented, in GREAT detail how each track on the cds were recorded, what microphones, why, and what you are hearing(and why you are hearing it!!)...

Next in line would be "the new stereo soundbook" but it isnt as in -depth. after that, would be "Total Recording" by Moulton--basically a watered down version of what Mr. Eargle(RIP) was outlining..

Eargle was a genius.
Old 12th June 2009
  #22
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Thanks, very helpful.
Old 12th June 2009
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seanmccoy View Post
Thanks, very helpful.

no problem, Sean.
Old 13th June 2009
  #24
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Kenny Gioia's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post
The Daily Adventures of Mixerman [which is now available from "spam spam"]. Won't teach you how to mix any better but it's a fun read none the less.
And it can teach you how to be a bitter "know it all" engineer who has no respect for producers, managers, lawyers or the musicians you record.

Which will help you…

How?

I guess being entertained is more important than learning. dfegad

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post
BTW, reading books on mixing is like reading a book on painting... you might get an interesting idea or two to try but until you actually get into the hot seat you'll still have no idea of what you're doing.
Very true but reading the works of some "real" great engineers can be inspiring and the only way to connect with those professionals.

I would never encourage someone (in this day and age) to NOT read a book but you will learn more (eventually) from doing.

1. Read (be a sponge)
2. Watch videos (shameless. I know)
3. Find a mentor.
4. Get to work.
Old 20th June 2009
  #25
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Hey Kenny,

I see your sexual fustrations on Mixerman coming out again!

AHAHA.

Max
Old 21st June 2009
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Stephens View Post
Hey Kenny,

I see your sexual fustrations on Mixerman coming out again!

AHAHA.

Max
Nope. Just don't see what it has to do with becoming a better mixer.

dfegad

Does he actually mix records?
Old 21st June 2009
  #27
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Personally I read as much of that sort of stuff as I can because there's always something somewhere in every book that increases your understanding, or gets you thinking differently. These books aren't gospel, and it's ok to disagree with them, but there's always something to take away.

I loved Mixing With Your Mind and I found Behind The Glass interesting too. Roey Ishaki's book is great if you're after descriptions of basic toolsand processes.

J
Old 21st June 2009
  #28
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Kenny Gioia's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Ruston View Post
Personally I read as much of that sort of stuff as I can because there's always something somewhere in every book that increases your understanding, or gets you thinking differently. These books aren't gospel, and it's ok to disagree with them, but there's always something to take away.

I loved Mixing With Your Mind and I found Behind The Glass interesting too. Roey Ishaki's book is great if you're after descriptions of basic toolsand processes.

J
I agree. I believe we never stop learning and I have learned many times from an assistant, an intern and even a client how to mix better.

So why not a professional?

It also challenges you to rethink things. Take inventory of your current inventory of tricks and keep some and lose others.

Cheers.
Old 21st June 2009
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berserk539 View Post

Bobby Owsinski has penned a few books on mixing and mastering. They cover many of the points that need to be covered.
+1 I found "The mixing engineers handbook" very useful
Old 21st June 2009
  #30
Gear Head
 

sorry if this somewhat off-topic but idid not want to start another thread. I just checked out the "Golden Ears" ear training series and it seems extremely interesting. Has anyone used it and would it actually be helpful. Im still new to recording and i think a good understanding of compression and all sorts of effects would be a great help. If this cd is useless however id rather skip it.
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