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Mic choice/placement for this traditional instrument (TAMMORRA)?
Old 19th February 2020
  #1
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Mic choice/placement for this traditional instrument (TAMMORRA)?

Hi there,

Which microphone types would you use to record this trad instrument called "tammorra" or "tamburello"?

It can produce pretty low sounds and even "bass notes" by tightening up the skin (minute 0:19), but also loads of highs with the small cymbals:


(Is the drum instrument on the left)

My take:

1 x Large Diaphragm Condenser (behind the skin)
2 x Small Diaphragm as Over Heads (above the player, X position)
1 x Mono large Diaphragm (as a room mic)

The track will be an experimental combination of pop/electronic and traditional so NOT the usual role for this instrument.
In the track, the Tammorra will be the main drum beat in some parts of the song, and suit as a percussive element (over an electronic beat) for other parts.

Thank you very much
Old 20th February 2020
  #2
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anyone?
Old 20th February 2020
  #3
What microphones do you have?
You can essentially use any mic for it. One that comes to mind is just an SM57 a foot away from it. If you want basic, but if you want to get fancy, then your room will play a role in how you position them. There endless ways to mic it and endless mic choices
Old 23rd February 2020
  #4
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I can have access to:

- akg 451
- akg 414
- neumann U87
- sm7b
Old 23rd February 2020
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
What microphones do you have?
You can essentially use any mic for it. One that comes to mind is just an SM57 a foot away from it. If you want basic, but if you want to get fancy, then your room will play a role in how you position them. There endless ways to mic it and endless mic choices
replied above sorry
Old 26th February 2020
  #6
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Any suggestion will be highly appreciated
Old 28th February 2020
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomPerson View Post
Any suggestion will be highly appreciated
Try all 4 of those mics in different parts of your room and see what sounds the best for you and fits your personnel preferences.

When i record in a new room with new mic's i am not familiar with, i will try different mics, positions and room placements, trying to figure out the best places to record certain instruments.

No one here can know what will sound best for you, your personnel preferences in an unknown room and an unknown mix (other instrument effects other instruments in a mix)
Its something i keep in the back of my head when i am recording,. I think about the other instruments in the mix as well
Old 4 weeks ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
Try all 4 of those mics in different parts of your room and see what sounds the best for you and fits your personnel preferences.

When i record in a new room with new mic's i am not familiar with, i will try different mics, positions and room placements, trying to figure out the best places to record certain instruments.

No one here can know what will sound best for you, your personnel preferences in an unknown room and an unknown mix (other instrument effects other instruments in a mix)
Its something i keep in the back of my head when i am recording,. I think about the other instruments in the mix as well
I may have limited time as I will be recording this abroad, not in my studio and not with all my microphones.

I was hoping to get a feedback about the way I would approach this instrument. As the Tammorra would be the main drum instrument in some parts of the song, my idea was to set the mikes as I would do with a drumkit rather than percussions. Therefore: a close dynamic + 2 over heads + mono room mike. Could this possibly work?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
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Are you recording this instrument as a solo/overdub or along with other instruments or vocals?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #10
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Four mics? It is not big enough or complicated enough for that. I don’t use four mics on a grand piano.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
Are you recording this instrument as a solo/overdub or along with other instruments or vocals?
The song will be a full experimental pop track with vocals, bass, guitars, synths and backing vocals.

Every instrument will be recorded in overdub. So, in this case, the musician will be tracked while playing on his own in an empty studio room, listening to the guide track in his in ears monitors.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
Four mics? It is not big enough or complicated enough for that. I don’t use four mics on a grand piano.
What would be your approach?

If you didn't do it already, please watch the video in the first post with decent headphones, as what I am referring to is not audible from laptop/smartphones speakers. Please focus at minute 0:19. I think from the video example, it can be noticed that the way the musician plays the Tammorra is quite unique. The player can almost create a sort of a bass line simultaneously with a drum beat.

Also the small cymbals around the frame make this instrument quite full in terms of frequency range.

And, lastly, please consider that this will be the main drum in some parts of the track.

I am open to any suggestions, and apologies if you did watch the video already with decent headphones/speakers.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
Lives for gear
Guilty as charged... I thought you had included the clip as a visual reference.
Listening to the clip with good phones and observing that the tambourine seems to be captured with an SM57 about a foot behind the head, this is what I think.
The single 57 is OK, but you want more than “OK” because you want to feature the instrument. I would try the 414 (which 414 might matter a bit) about two feet in front of the head. The 414 is going to pick up more edge and transients than a 57 in any placement, but the mic behind does not “see” the finger and hand strikes. For very high highs, a mic doesn’t hear what it cannot see. I would experiment with distance to see if a closer placement gives some proximity boost to the low end. But I suspect that you are going to have to bump the low end with EQ if you want those “bass” hits to jump out a little. I’d love to record this instrument with an accomplished player.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
For very high highs, a mic doesn’t hear what it cannot see.
Thanks very much for this. Some good interesting points there.

The only thing I did not catch is if you are suggesting a dual mike technique (414 in the front + SM57 on the back) or single microphone (with the 414 about two feet in front of the head).

You also reminded me to ask which 414 they have available.

I will also probably bring some of my mikes just in case:
- Oktava Mk319
- 2 x Oktava MK220
- 2 x CAD GXL1200

But those will be just a backup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
I’d love to record this instrument with an accomplished player.
Even though I am really excited about recording this (the musician is incredibly talented and also a great guy overall), I am a bit stressed out, because I have never recorded anything exactly like that before and it's not in my place. Maybe you can come and give us a hand?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #15
Lives for gear
Single mic... 414 in front. I’m a simple person. I don’t see this as a stereo instrument, and adding mics can subtract or add something. I don’t know what adding mics would add in terms of result. I’m not usually a room mic person, but some people love a room mic (in a good room).
Old 4 weeks ago
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
Single mic... 414 in front. I’m a simple person. I don’t see this as a stereo instrument, and adding mics can subtract or add something. I don’t know what adding mics would add in terms of result. I’m not usually a room mic person, but some people love a room mic (in a good room).
Makes total sense.

Thank you very much!
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