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What kind of reverb should I use!?
Old 10th December 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
 

What kind of reverb should I use!?

(I posted this in the forum "Newbie Audio Engineering + Production Question Zone" but I just got invited in this forum so I thought that I could ask this question here as well)

Hello!

I'm new here and I'm desperate for help!

I've been using Logic Pro X for a while now but one thing I still trying to figure out is the reverb. I really can't figure out what kind of reverb for what instrument I should use! I'm really frustrated and I've been trying to figure out the reverb on this mix for weeks now but I can't seem to do it. Almost giving up here...

So what kind of reverb do you like on different instruments and vocals? Like, do you use halls for strings? What kind of halls? Small halls, medium halls or big halls? What do you use for vocals? Plates, halls or rooms? I really want to hear your go to reverbs for different instruments and vocals!

I would really appreciate some help and would be so thankful if somebody could help me out! Thank you in advance!
Old 10th December 2019
  #2
Gear Nut
 

This may sound a bit snarky but can't you try out and see what sounds good, regarding electronic music everything goes,altho not a fan of the lately abused shimmer stuff,subtlety is key in reverbs unless you're dubbing.
Try valhalla room or vintage verb they're cheap and very good.
Old 11th December 2019
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by e95e View Post
.. help!
[assorted snips.. ]
.. I'm really frustrated and I've been trying to figure out the reverb on this mix for weeks now but I can't seem to do it. Almost giving up here...

So what kind of reverb do you like on different instruments and vocals? Like, do you use halls for strings? What kind of halls? Small halls, medium halls or big halls? What do you use for vocals? Plates, halls or rooms? I really want to hear your go to reverbs for different instruments and vocals!
I for one don't think in terms of -or have 'go-tos for given instruments.
For one, there's huge overlap that can be had in general between the various 'styles or types. In other words -depending on how the're set up- they can have a lot of 'common traits shared. One can often do what another does.

Obviously experiment and compare. But also get familiar with some of the terms that basically define how they act.

Size -ranges in decay times typically. But where for example a 'hall, scaled down can become more of a room. Or a 'plate can be sized up as a 'hall, or down as a short snare plate or ambiance.

Density -or diffusion. Low diffusion can add articulation' in a verb -on smooth things. One a snare crack' it can chatter like hell. Hall, Plate, Rooms, same same.

Shape, Pre Delay... some others.

Then armed with some of these 'tools (and understanding) comes the fun part (I didn't say easy- at first :>)
How or what you might think matches up with what you'd like to try to fit' a given track's 'place or 'roll here in your mix.
Sometimes it helps to keep these effects tucked back in -both in terms of how much is really needed?, and then also their smaller details / differences aren't as critical.

Maybe poke around in here for some starter examples..
https://lexiconpro.com/en/products/p...plug-in-bundle
Hope it helps.
Old 11th December 2019
  #4
I would love to give you one, but there is really no good answer to the question you have framed. Here are a couple of things I do.

- Try using a mono reverb for panned elements
- Increase the predelay to move the element forward in the room
- Select a reverb sound you like and then decrease the level until you can just barely hear it. Then decrease it a bit more. It will seem like it is gone, but if you mute it, you will hear the difference.
- Use a short, mono room reverb followed by a longer, stereo plate or hall
- Try bussing things to one or two reverb channels. Alternatively, try adding individual reverbs as inserts on each channel. See which one you like better.
Old 11th December 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by astralpen View Post
I would love to give you one, but there is really no good answer to the question you have framed. Here are a couple of things I do.

- Try using a mono reverb for panned elements
- Increase the predelay to move the element forward in the room
- Select a reverb sound you like and then decrease the level until you can just barely hear it. Then decrease it a bit more. It will seem like it is gone, but if you mute it, you will hear the difference.
- Use a short, mono room reverb followed by a longer, stereo plate or hall
- Try bussing things to one or two reverb channels. Alternatively, try adding individual reverbs as inserts on each channel. See which one you like better.
Yes, one very important useful concept! I was on my way back and would have put it in if you hadn't.

Here's good experiment to illustrate the effect.
Pull up a med-small 'room, or short plate. Re the plate, we want simple reverb decay here, no 'added delay/echo paths in it for this. (Also why not a 'hall 'scaled down.)

Zero out any pre-delay that might be on it.
Send it a drum mix for example (plenty of transient to hear image and depth details).
Bring the wet mix up enough to where the kit 'sits in this room (30% maybe?)

Now dial in in steps say 3--8ms of of predelay.
In this range the kit image goes from 'in the room', to forward of the room.

Now go above the 8ms range to out around 20ms or more.
The kit is still 'forward, but now these short 'reflections are heard distinct rather than 'attached to the kit.
Part of the Haas effects (look it up :>)

And now this same 'room patch also takes on the roll of a much larger space -as the walls' being much further away..

"Small room" From the kit enveloped in it, to 'kit forward of the room, ..to "large room". All pretty much just following the Haas effect on how we hear, perceive and localize things.

Last edited by Wayne; 12th December 2019 at 12:02 AM.. Reason: misspelled Dr Haas's name ..again
Old 12th December 2019
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
I for one don't think in terms of -or have 'go-tos for given instruments.
For one, there's huge overlap that can be had in general between the various 'styles or types. In other words -depending on how the're set up- they can have a lot of 'common traits shared. One can often do what another does.

Obviously experiment and compare. But also get familiar with some of the terms that basically define how they act.

Size -ranges in decay times typically. But where for example a 'hall, scaled down can become more of a room. Or a 'plate can be sized up as a 'hall, or down as a short snare plate or ambiance.

Density -or diffusion. Low diffusion can add articulation' in a verb -on smooth things. One a snare crack' it can chatter like hell. Hall, Plate, Rooms, same same.

Shape, Pre Delay... some others.

Then armed with some of these 'tools (and understanding) comes the fun part (I didn't say easy- at first :>)
How or what you might think matches up with what you'd like to try to fit' a given track's 'place or 'roll here in your mix.
Sometimes it helps to keep these effects tucked back in -both in terms of how much is really needed?, and then also their smaller details / differences aren't as critical.

Maybe poke around in here for some starter examples..
https://lexiconpro.com/en/products/p...plug-in-bundle
Hope it helps.
Thank you so much for the answer and the link for the reverb!
I downloaded the demo and it sounds so good! I can really see that a plate that is sized up can sound like a hall etc. It's a really good tip! I really love the echos in the vocals plates.
Trying to figure out what reverb would sound best with my mix, I'm going for a live sound and I have some reference tracks so I try to match those. I guess it's all about the ears, huh? Lol.
Old 12th December 2019
  #7
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by astralpen View Post
I would love to give you one, but there is really no good answer to the question you have framed. Here are a couple of things I do.

- Try using a mono reverb for panned elements
- Increase the predelay to move the element forward in the room
- Select a reverb sound you like and then decrease the level until you can just barely hear it. Then decrease it a bit more. It will seem like it is gone, but if you mute it, you will hear the difference.
- Use a short, mono room reverb followed by a longer, stereo plate or hall
- Try bussing things to one or two reverb channels. Alternatively, try adding individual reverbs as inserts on each channel. See which one you like better.

Thank you so much for these tips! Never thought of using a mono reverb on panned instruments. Such a good tip!
Old 12th December 2019
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
Yes, one very important useful concept! I was on my way back and would have put it in if you hadn't.

Here's good experiment to illustrate the effect.
Pull up a med-small 'room, or short plate. Re the plate, we want simple reverb decay here, no 'added delay/echo paths in it for this. (Also why not a 'hall 'scaled down.)

Zero out any pre-delay that might be on it.
Send it a drum mix for example (plenty of transient to hear image and depth details).
Bring the wet mix up enough to where the kit 'sits in this room (30% maybe?)

Now dial in in steps say 3--8ms of of predelay.
In this range the kit image goes from 'in the room', to forward of the room.

Now go above the 8ms range to out around 20ms or more.
The kit is still 'forward, but now these short 'reflections are heard distinct rather than 'attached to the kit.
Part of the Haas effects (look it up :>)

And now this same 'room patch also takes on the roll of a much larger space -as the walls' being much further away..

"Small room" From the kit enveloped in it, to 'kit forward of the room, ..to "large room". All pretty much just following the Haas effect on how we hear, perceive and localize things.
I will definitely check the Haas effect and test it out right now! Sounds very interesting!
Old 12th December 2019
  #9
Quote:
I really can't figure out what kind of reverb for what instrument I should use! I'm really frustrated and I've been trying to figure out the reverb on this mix for weeks now but I can't seem to do it. Almost giving up here...
The reverb and settings you choose will all depend on
how you want it to sound
1. Your personnel preferences
2. How the source tracks sound originally
3. Ware you want the sound coming from
4. The room the tracks were recorded in

For me, the kind of reverb i choose depends on where i want the instrument to sound like its coming form when i am mixing. You need to try and make your mix as 3D as possible. you want instrument sin the back left, front right, med center, front center, front hard left and so on.
Old 12th December 2019
  #10
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by e95e View Post
Thank you so much for these tips! Never thought of using a mono reverb on panned instruments. Such a good tip!
Notice some verbs come with an actual width control. (Lex is one.) 'Standard width -is what it is, but you can go partly or fully mono for directly behind the source (or wider than 'normal as well..)
I mentioned Lexicon more as tutorial, but glad you found them interesting!
Here's another good source; (documentation pages
https://valhalladsp.com/shop/reverb/valhalla-room/
Old 13th December 2019
  #11
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by e95e View Post
I've been using Logic Pro X for a while now but one thing I still trying to figure out is the reverb. I really can't figure out what kind of reverb for what instrument I should use!
IMO, reverb is not a "for what instrument" effect. IMO, one of the reasons reverb is usually on auxes instead of inserts is because reverb is more properly a Mix Effect, not an Instrument Effect.

I tend to use reverbs to create a space or a stage for the entire mix to reside in. There is usually a shared room that most instruments will get some of. Typically a medium room. Probably not kick or bass, though, as reverb on those instruments can often muddy things up. There might be a smaller tighter space for the vocals, an deeper echoey "slap" for the snare, etc.

But still these may be still "shared". I typically have 5 or more reverbs in a song and almost all of them "overlap". That is to say, the instruments in that mix will share the reverbs in different proportions. The lead vocal may get some small room and a tiny bit of large room. The snare may get quite a bit of large room but still get some small room. The guitar may get medium and large. etc

The idea IMO is not so much to create "separate spaces" for different instruments, but a single "more complex" space that they all are situated in. Broadly speaking, more reverb and larger reverbs move an instrument "back" and less reverb and smaller reverbs will seem closer.

There are exceptions of course. In a sparse mix, a little reverb on kick or bass can be nice and not mush things up too much. Sometimes you don't really want realism and a unique "spotlight" reverb on a single instrument can sound cool or help keep it from masking.

But overall, most of the time, I approach the reverbs I use as "for the band" not strictly "for the instrument". Here is a chart showing the idea. Almost all the instruments are sharing the medium room. They are overlapping or not overlapping to various degrees with varying amounts in the other rooms, mostly for a "front-to-back" kind of illusion. Not suggesting this as a "template" or anything, just an illustration of how the different amounts can overlap.
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What kind of reverb should I use!?-last.png  
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
Here for the gear
 

You should try yourself to see what you like!
I suggest you to buy valhalla vintage verb and/or fabfilter pro R and mess with the presets at first.
You can do the same thing with your stock reverb of course!
Find some presets that you like overall and tweak them from there!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
Lives for gear
 
chrischoir's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by e95e View Post
(I posted this in the forum "Newbie Audio Engineering + Production Question Zone" but I just got invited in this forum so I thought that I could ask this question here as well)

Hello!

I'm new here and I'm desperate for help!

I've been using Logic Pro X for a while now but one thing I still trying to figure out is the reverb. I really can't figure out what kind of reverb for what instrument I should use! I'm really frustrated and I've been trying to figure out the reverb on this mix for weeks now but I can't seem to do it. Almost giving up here...

So what kind of reverb do you like on different instruments and vocals? Like, do you use halls for strings? What kind of halls? Small halls, medium halls or big halls? What do you use for vocals? Plates, halls or rooms? I really want to hear your go to reverbs for different instruments and vocals!

I would really appreciate some help and would be so thankful if somebody could help me out! Thank you in advance!

Reverb setting is all preference, nothing more. What sounds the best. There is no guideline, it's all up to you. Vocals use any and all settings depending on the mix, the style of music and the voice. Sometimes the best reverb is no reverb.

IMO the best way gauge what may work for you is to go listen to stems on youtube of famous mixes, then listen to your reverb plugins, get a feel for what settings produce what specific sound. Then you can use or not use those settings.

I will say most great engineers and producers use digital reverb sparingly.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #14
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrischoir View Post
I will say most great engineers and producers use digital reverb sparingly.
I am not claiming to be "great", but I think I do use reverb (all reverbs- not just digital ones) "sparingly".

But by "sparingly", I mean in amount, percentage.

That is to say, I usually have a rather complex reverb setup, involving many different overlapping reverbs. But the average person might think the tracks were quite on the dry side. Often I will crank it up at the beginning to make sure the rooms are appropriate, and then back it down to where I can barely tell it's there.

Like many things in mixing, I often go on 'faith' that minuscule moves - while being difficult to notice on their own - are all contributing to a cumulative effect on the mix.
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