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Connecting TV Audio to Audio Interface
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
Connecting TV Audio to Audio Interface

Hi there,

I am trying to connect my TV (headphone out) and Chromecast Audio to my monitors using my Focusrite Scarlett 6i6. However, when I try to use any of the inputs to play music, it sounds like its drenched in reverb and parts like the lead vocal are inaudible.
I think this could possibly be a mono/stereo issue? Ideally, I would like to use outputs 3 & 4 of my interface, 3 for the Chromecast, 4 for the TV. However, now I see that this won't work.

Would it be possible to buy a headphone splitter (to route both devices to a singular jack) and TRS Y cable (to split the stereo signal into two supposedly mono inputs, 3 & 4) to connect up both the TV and Chromecast in stereo?

Failing that, my (active) monitors (M-Audio BX5a) have a TRS and XLR inputs and the manual states:
Quote:
The TRS input is summed through a balanced input amplifier with the XLR input, allowing both inputs to be used simultaneously. Input specifications apply to both.
Does this mean I could use a small mixer to connect the TV and chromecast to the monitors via XLR? All the while still being able to use my interface connected by TRS?

Thanks for any help in advance!
George
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 
BT64's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB01 View Post
Does this mean I could use a small mixer to connect the TV and chromecast to the monitors via XLR? All the while still being able to use my interface connected by TRS?

Thanks for any help in advance!
George
Correct.
But don't forget that stereo out is not balanced.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Here for the gear
Thank you!
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Gear Nut
 
bmanzer's Avatar
This might be what you're looking for:

https://www.radialeng.com/product/jpc/features

It converts consumer audio to mic level and is powered by phantom 48v.
I haven't used one but remembered seeing it so thought I would suggest it.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Lives for gear
 

There are "some" headphone jacks that double as a line output. Unless the gear specifications tell you specifically that the jack also works as a like out it should never be connected directly to anything but headphones.

If it is a Headphone only jack, then the only work around you can use is to use attenuators for each channel to reduce the signal gain so it doesn't distort or damage the gear you connect it to. This will also reduce the background hiss/noise floor and allow you to turn the gain up where it produces a much better frequency response.

Also you didn't say anything about the gear you have connected to the TV. Just about every piece of gear these days have RCA connectors for connecting satellite, cable, VCR, DVD audio and video to the television. Unless you have some dire need to take the audio from the set itself its far better to get the audio from the cables feeding the TV. All you need to do is install Y jacks if your cable or gear doesn't have extra RCA sends.

I know on my Cable receiver I have 2 sets of RCA sends. My VCR/DVD units also have extra audio sends which I use to feed a surround amp. Last thing you want is to use a crappy Headphone jack. That jack is designed to move headphone diaphragms not feed outer audio devices. Like I said there are some exceptions like a laptop uses to feed line level or headphones, electronic Keyboards often use them as do cell phone jacks but read the manual first. A strong low impedance headphone amp can damage or blow line level preamps if the signal is too strong. As a electronic I've seen the damage having the wrong signal levels feeding gain stages. The damage can sometimes occur instantly like at power up or be much more subtle and cook preamps over time. Untrained ears may only be able to tell the difference when something completely dies, they may not notice how low voltage parts overheat and gradually drift out of specs and develop mild levels of distortion.

As a tech I usually discover things like this signal tracing the circuits. One channel's components always tends to weaken before the other. When you find the early gain stages sounding like crap you learn a lot quizzing the customers and how they are running their gear. I love the ones who say, I been doing it that way for years and never had a problem. My answer, you been abusing your gear this long and its only now giving you problems? That's a testament to the quality of the gear not a justification to continue the abuse. As gear gets older its caps dry out and tolerances drift out of specs. Call it hardening of the arteries. Pus old gear hard its going to show its weakness if not flat out fail. As always, people will do what they want however. I used to love charging them double when thay continues to abuse the gear after I had given them fair warning.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Quetz's Avatar
Just go digital.

Why fanny around with signal-degrading analogue splitters and whatnot.

If your tv is even halfway recent it should have an optical stereo (toslink = s/pdif) output.

Buy a £20 optical <--> coaxial s/pdif converter from Amazon and run that from your tv into the 6i6's coaxial s/pdif input.

So optical cable from tv to converter, coaxial cable from converter to 6i6.

Job done with zero quality loss whatsoever.
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