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Defective/Accidentally Engaged Mic HPF Issue
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
Defective/Accidentally Engaged Mic HPF Issue

Hi,

Rather not so impressed to announce this but I have a question. I bought a blue baby bottle SL microphone a little earlier this year, which has a switch for a high pass filter with 100db roll off at -12db per octave and, long story short, I've come to realize the switch, which I by choice would not want engaged ever when recording vocals (would rather leave to my engineer to do ITB), was actually engaged ever since I received it. And the switch is actually defective because when trying to flip it the switch is flaccid it just moves passively as if it is broken and there is no change in the frequency/hpf turning on vs off it just stays on permanently even if in the off position or what have you. I came to this realization when pulling up the parametric EQ, in logic by chance just this weekend.

So...I'm kind of not happy about this as I've already recorded 3 songs (about 14 vox tracks in each already sent off with the beat multi-tracks to engineer) and I will not re-record all these tracks – so my question is how much of a problem does a 100db with -12db octave roll off (not the steepest thankfully) present if recorded, by intent or not in my case, on the way in present for the mixing of the track. Part of me thinks I should just relax 100db is not that much it probably isn't going to make a huge diff, but part of me also thinks regardless of how good the mix sounds, I'll feel it could have been better because technically I did not truly capture the full sound because all the vox are missing some low end frequencies. As I'm a male I would assume there is still some valuable freqs to be had between the 75-100hz range in terms of "chest"/richness/fullness colouration that you could not get back if you eliminate them on the way in. So I'm just like...really annoyed about this because I spend a lot of time trying to do everything correct and then I discover this defect.

Definitely requesting blue replace my mic for free because I just bought this thing not that long ago this year and honestly I'm just annoyed I wish I could have got the version of the blue mic prior to the SL that never even had a switch that could cause this inconvenience to begin with. Ugh.

So yes please let me know the extent to which the negative effect of this could present on the recordings I've been making or should I just relax i.e. it won't be as noticeable as I'm thinking now in the heat of the realization. Thanks.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

The engineer would probably hi-pass youre vocals anyway. I wouldn't worry about it.

Definatly get a replacement if it came to you like this.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monk u View Post
The engineer would probably hi-pass youre vocals anyway. I wouldn't worry about it.

Definatly get a replacement if it came to you like this.
I understand that but from my understanding the high pass on the way in can affect the colouration/tone of the captured voice/source no? Which is why it is best to not engage in on the way in unless there are absolutely no frequencies to be had below 100 hz guaranteed no? Either way it sounds like maybe it's not as bad of a situation as I thought because indeed an engineer would definitely roll off low end anyway...but idk...maybe an 70hz roll off or something for a male voice or who knows I never will I guess for those 3 songs but same time I think I'm still stewing over it all since I didn't notice this earlier so I'm wearing an honorary dunce hat or something it feels.

And yes I'm going to request it to be replaced because the switch just literally gave out and and fell off like it was something flimsy when I was trying to reinspect the matter today. So there's definitely something amiss here I know it's not supposed to be like this and that Blue mic's are of good standard/quality. This is definitely a lemon though.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Addict
 

You are overthinking this (I totally understand why, as I'm very obsessive when it comes to this stuff). That high pass filter exists primarily to counteract the proximity effect that happens when things are mic'd closely (that's typically how we record vocals). I am going to, in almost every instance, roll off the low end on a lead vocal. sometimes it will be at 100hz. sometimes it will be even higher. Sometimes it will be at 70hz. There are so many factors at play here like how close the singer was to the mic, how the mic was positioned, etc...
The things is, before you realized the switch on your mic was broken, you liked the way the vocals sounded, otherwise you would have selected a different mic. You instinctively found that sound pleasing. Nothing has changed other than you knowing a switch was broken. I suggest getting a replacement mic, and embracing the projects you've already recorded with the broken one. It sounded good to you on the way in. That is more than half the battle
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionaudio View Post
The things is, before you realized the switch on your mic was broken, you liked the way the vocals sounded, otherwise you would have selected a different mic. You instinctively found that sound pleasing. Nothing has changed other than you knowing a switch was broken. I suggest getting a replacement mic, and embracing the projects you've already recorded with the broken one. It sounded good to you on the way in. That is more than half the battle
You know what actually the way you've put it there that's much more than true in fact. I'm being retrospectively displeased with something I was proactively pleased with in the moment. It's true. In a way well actually yes completely you're right on that point to be fair.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lionaudio View Post
You are overthinking this (I totally understand why, as I'm very obsessive when it comes to this stuff). That high pass filter exists primarily to counteract the proximity effect that happens when things are mic'd closely (that's typically how we record vocals). I am going to, in almost every instance, roll off the low end on a lead vocal. sometimes it will be at 100hz. sometimes it will be even higher. Sometimes it will be at 70hz. There are so many factors at play here like how close the singer was to the mic, how the mic was positioned, etc...
I overthink the technical stuff too much probably and I think it's by nature as you indicated and relate to. Proximity effect I think I have a good handle on as I've been at this for a while but I do the whole keep the pop filter about 4-6 inches from the mic and then stand further back still for me another 3-5 back depending on my gain staging/other levels and tone of voice I'm going for etc you know the drill. But yes...in my head I am still kind of thinking what if this song would have been more ideal with a 70hz roll off like you mentioned and not a 100hz but again I guess that goes back to the point of stop sour graping I was happy wit how it sounded on the way in and that should be enough for me I guess. Of course the mind does play tricks on you though to make sure you keep remembering after you discovered something you initially hadn't noticed. Thoroughly not a fan of those tricks haha.
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