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How to get this sound
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

How to get this sound

I have a small project studio mainly for just me to record me playing acoustic and vocals. I use pro tools with the slate everything bundle. I have some low end mics like the Rode NT1 few sm57's, and some beta58's. I use the focusrite 2i2. I get decent recordings that sound ok but I have been trying hard to achieve this sound from this song. I have tried to use the Rode on vocals and the 57 on the acoustic and the same in reverse. I never seem to get close. I have imported the song and tried hard to replicate this. I can never seem to get the bleed of the two mics to sound as good. I can get my vocals to sound close to his if I turn the input gain up and allow the mic to be pretty hot but then I have too much bleed and my acoustic sounds like crap. I have tried tracking dry, tracking with some compression but still no joy. Any tips on how to achieve this live recorded sound? Also how much after work would have been done on the reference track to get it to sound like that? Would it have had lots of mixing and editing to get that quality? It sounds so pure and natural like they just set up a few mics, added some reverb and captured it. In a perfect world I'd like to get as close to that as I can. Any help or tips would be appreciated.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Quote:
Any tips on how to achieve this live recorded sound? Also how much after work would have been done on the reference track to get it to sound like that? Would it have had lots of mixing and editing to get that quality
You are not going to want to hear this, but the quality comes from:
1.) The artist itself
2.) Its how he sings the song, his performance.
3.) How he plays his guitar, his performance. The same guitar played by 2 different people can get 2 different sounds depending on how you play it
4.) Its the room he is in
5.) Its the mic he used
6.) Its the position of the mics in the room

But that said, 97% of the sound comes from that person singing sand playing. You will not get it form any effects.
Quote:
I can never seem to get the bleed of the two mics to sound as good. I can get my vocals to sound close to his if I turn the input gain up and allow the mic to be pretty hot but then I have too much bleed and my acoustic sounds like crap. I
If you are not happy with the bleed, try different mic positions and different positions in the room you are in. You may need a room that is more tuned, to absorb the standing waves, maybe or maybe not.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

You know I appreciate you even replying but honestly why bother. I mean wow 97% is the room and the artist, mic used, mic position, and performance. I have not wrote on here before because I read a lot on these forums and see so many replies to people like this one. I mean dang you guys sure spend a lot of money on that last 3% in gear for most of it all to come down to the artist and their performance. I think most of us know that if you are trying to capture a turd you will get a turd. I for one know that the things you mentioned all have a lot to do with it and figure that most would see all that as common knowledge as well. It's rare you ever see a reply on here that is actually helpful when it comes to a question from a newbie like this. You would think that people who once started out like us noobs would be able to go back in time and remember certain things that made huge impacts on their progression and respond in kind. Like: Perhaps try placing your vocal mic below u and facing up towards your mouth and maybe try to raise your guitar mic and angle it down a bit to see if that removes some of the bleed. Have you tried boosting or cutting around these frequencies(insert whatever) as they can tend cause the guitar and vocals to be in the same area and will mud up the track. Have you tried stereo mics on the guitars to create space around your vocals and see if that blends better together? In the video it sounds like he might have a slight delay on his voice. When I made the jump to this interface and or equipment my quality did improve. Watch these videos, they could be helpful in what you are trying to achieve. Any number of helpful tips could be given but all to often I read these replies from some of you and there just seems to be an elitist air to a lot of them. Like get a good artist and a great room and you are off. Well hell that's good to know cause here I was thinking I might have to make a few financial jumps to get to the quality I truly want when it turns out I just need to sing good and make sure my room is perfect. I'll be producing Grammy worthy music in no time. Now I realize why I never posted before. Thanks anyways.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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BT64's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadolds View Post
Well hell that's good to know cause here I was thinking I might have to make a few financial jumps to get to the quality I truly want when it turns out I just need to sing good and make sure my room is perfect. I'll be producing Grammy worthy music in no time.
Correct (and some artistic creativity will help to).
Did you truly think you could buy it?
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Nut
 
weave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadolds View Post
You know I appreciate you even replying but honestly why bother. I mean wow 97% is the room and the artist, mic used, mic position, and performance. I have not wrote on here before because I read a lot on these forums and see so many replies to people like this one. I mean dang you guys sure spend a lot of money on that last 3% in gear for most of it all to come down to the artist and their performance. I think most of us know that if you are trying to capture a turd you will get a turd. I for one know that the things you mentioned all have a lot to do with it and figure that most would see all that as common knowledge as well. It's rare you ever see a reply on here that is actually helpful when it comes to a question from a newbie like this. You would think that people who once started out like us noobs would be able to go back in time and remember certain things that made huge impacts on their progression and respond in kind. Like: Perhaps try placing your vocal mic below u and facing up towards your mouth and maybe try to raise your guitar mic and angle it down a bit to see if that removes some of the bleed. Have you tried boosting or cutting around these frequencies(insert whatever) as they can tend cause the guitar and vocals to be in the same area and will mud up the track. Have you tried stereo mics on the guitars to create space around your vocals and see if that blends better together? In the video it sounds like he might have a slight delay on his voice. When I made the jump to this interface and or equipment my quality did improve. Watch these videos, they could be helpful in what you are trying to achieve. Any number of helpful tips could be given but all to often I read these replies from some of you and there just seems to be an elitist air to a lot of them. Like get a good artist and a great room and you are off. Well hell that's good to know cause here I was thinking I might have to make a few financial jumps to get to the quality I truly want when it turns out I just need to sing good and make sure my room is perfect. I'll be producing Grammy worthy music in no time. Now I realize why I never posted before. Thanks anyways.
Perhaps posting what you have recorded along with the reference track you are trying to work towards, advice might be easier to give?

Just a thought.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Quote:
Did you truly think you could buy it?
LOL, I guess the Original Poster really thought that LOL
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Lives for gear
It's entirely possible that the guy in the video has DI'd the guitar.

Believe me when I say that doing this makes life much easier if you're going for "live" recordings (ie, playing and singing at the same time).

Set off with the DI'd guitar, and position the vocal mic so the guitar bleed sounds okay.

Record DI and vocal, and then here's the important bit: time-align the two.

There's a time-of-flight difference from the strings to the DI; and to the vocal mic. Time-of-flight difference = phase shifts = cancellations = rubbish tone.

So, pick an easy transient and get those two waveforms lined up.


With all that in place, I'd argue you can no longer blame the electronics. Look at acoustics and performance.

Chris

PS - I did come up with a mic technique that gives you stereo guitar, plus vocals, without the phase problems. I think I put it on my website somewhere, but I'll give you a quick overview here: I called it VXY (Vocals, XY) and it adds a mic underneath an XY setup, pointing up towards the singer, with all capsules coincident. You'll need to play with positioning a little, but the idea was that you'll get stereo guitar feed, plus a vocal mic. Both will have bleed from the other, but the cardioid pickup pattern is enough to give you a few dB of leeway when it comes to mixdown. Since the mics are coincident, you won't have trouble with phase differences.
The down-side is you need three matching mics. I use Beyer MC930s.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BT64 View Post
Correct (and some artistic creativity will help to).
Did you truly think you could buy it?
You are the exact kind of troll person I mentioned above. Never once in my original post did I ask what gear do I need to buy to get this sound. In Fact I asked some general questions and these are the BS replies you get from you hollier than thou recording gods who lurk these noob zones to make your head feel big. I was more curious as to was there a lot of automation and fader riding or did he get this sound pretty live and do very little mixing and editing. I was hoping to get thoughts on what you guys might bear in that song and how you thought it was done. I know you can't buy your way into but you also wouldn't have racks of stuff and high dollar misc if you could record a platinum record on a starter set. And if you could then I guess you all have wasted a ton of money. Cheers you all rock I wont be posting again
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Gear Nut
 
weave's Avatar
 

Recording Revolution - How to record Vocals and Acoustic guitar at the same time

This might help. Also check some of the related videos - might give you a few things to try.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Lives for gear
 
BT64's Avatar
@ Chadolds , I'm sorry you see it that way.
I was reacting to your second post and also quoted that.
A lot of people do waste money if you look at it that way.
Too often I see people here asking questions about gear that I could only dream of but the questions are about simple basic things.
We all have to learn, I'm learning every day.
And that's ok, but expectations are often far from reality.
That there are people or studio's that spend a fare lot of money on gear is often just that they have plenty of money, they don't really need it.
The biggest mistake I often see happening is that people start to belief it's all in the gear (hey we are on gearsluts here), but forget that the biggest contribution to a great result is for the biggest part performance, and knowledge of using what they already got.

There was a studio that invited students to give their opinion about some preamps.
They were listening to some expensive preamps against a dead cheap one.
They didn't know which one they were listening to.
You guess it, they couldn't hear any difference or even preferred the cheap one.
After telling the truth a student ask why the studio would invest in expensive preamps if the difference wasn't that obvious.
They honestly explained that customers paying good money expect to see that kind of gear and they simply have the budget.
Is there no difference? Yeah sure there is, but they are minor in the end and things like build quality are important to if you are working with them every day.

These days it seems that expectations are also that we can get fast fixes (tutorials or effects) for issues we encounter.
And yes, you can learn a lot that way but every situation is different and every issue is unique as is the solution.
Experiment and use your ears! It can be frustrating but you will learn the most that way.
So perhaps my reaction was out of frustration that a lot of people just don't invest in themselves and only look for quick answers.
And that's not fair to you, sorry for that.
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