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Do I need to use reverbs, delays etc on a send if my DAW has a mix knob?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Do I need to use reverbs, delays etc on a send if my DAW has a mix knob?

Just switched from Studio One to FL Studio and every plugin insert has a mix knob where I can adjust how much of the effect is being used, just like a send track. So is it essentially the same thing, or is there still a benefit to using a send track besides being able to route multiple elements to the same send to save cpu? Also the reverb I use has a built in EQ so I don't have to worry about using an EQ for the verb.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
Do you want elements of the mix to occupy the same space? I know I do. I like to put the instruments into the same chamber, but maybe a bit more for whatever I want to sit further back in the mix.

You can’t really do that as well with the same plugin inserted on every track with the mix knob adjusted. Plus it’s a waste of CPU running all those instances.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
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Sometimes compressors with parallel mix paths can be useful.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
open_source's Avatar
 

You still want to use sends so that you can EQ the reverb separate from the sound source.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #5
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When I use sends how can I control how much of a particular sound is effected by the reverb? Say I send a synth and a guitar to the same fx track, theyre going to have the same amount of reverb but what if I want the guitar to have less reverb than the synth?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbynes View Post
When I use sends how can I control how much of a particular sound is effected by the reverb? Say I send a synth and a guitar to the same fx track, theyre going to have the same amount of reverb but what if I want the guitar to have less reverb than the synth?
By setting up aux sends to the reverb or FX bus for each track as you like. Then each can be set for whatever wet blend needed for it's place in a mix.
The verb is sett 100% 'wet, and the bus's main fader (or sometimes called 'FX track..) is your reverb master and overall 'wet level to the main mix.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #7
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An example would be if you want multiple instruments to receive the same effect, e.g. you want all the instruments to be in the same "room" with a particular reverb.

As far as changing the volumes for each instrument, FL Studio has four default send tracks, and each channel strip has a dedicated knob for changing the level going to each one. FL has those convenient little green paths that show you where everything is going.

Old 4 weeks ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cursed Lemon View Post
An example would be if you want multiple instruments to receive the same effect, e.g. you want all the instruments to be in the same "room" with a particular reverb.

As far as changing the volumes for each instrument, FL Studio has four default send tracks, and each channel strip has a dedicated knob for changing the level going to each one. FL has those convenient little green paths that show you where everything is going.

Wow I completely missed that the knobs at the bottom of the send tracks change depending on which mixer insert you have selected. Thanks!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
Sometimes compressors with parallel mix paths can be useful.
I agree.

But time-based effects on mix knobs are not as useful for a number of reasons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbynes
is there still a benefit to using a send track besides being able to route multiple elements to the same send to save cpu
Yes. Several. First of all, IMHO, reverb is a mix effect, not an instrument effect. It is for creating a space for the whole band to be in. The purpose of reverb is to make the various instruments blend - or separate. That's one reason for me to deal with reverb and delays on the mixer level.

To make them sound like they are in the same space, or perhaps different distances away in the same space. Putting one kind of reverb on one instrument and a totally different reverb on another works against this philosophy.

Using auxes as send/return you can cover the entire band with 3-4 instances of reverb plugins (the CPU argument) but also, you can overlap them. That is, the snare may get a lot of small room and less large room and the toms will get less small and more large. Both drums will be sharing both reverb. Just in different proportions. A third or forth reverb may be involved in this overlapping. Now imagine having to put each of these four reverbs (with the same presets) on each of the tracks in your mix! The CPU argument just got a lot stronger!

Secondly there is the ease of adjustment. Even if it was not wasteful to put multiple identical reverb plugins on each and every track, what if, mid-mix you wish to tweak the levels of small room reverb on the snare and toms? You will have to open those plugins and adjust the percentage knobs. This will also change the apparent volume of the instrument. Add more reverb to the snare and you are lowering the amount of snare because it is a percentage that can only total 100%.

You cannot even easily check the status of your reverbs because you would again have to open the plug-in to see where they were set. If you have sends, there is a nice clear row of faders or knobs to look at for each reverb sound you are using. You can instantly see which instruments have which reverb and how much.

My rule of thumb is this: If the effect is for the sound of that one instrument- if it is a flange on a guitar for example - do it as an insert with percentages. If it is an effect for the mix as a whole, such as a room sound, hall, plate that all the instruments (or many of the instruments) will have on for the purposes of 'spatial' reality or 'glue' or 'mix cohesion' or ''blending', do it as a send/return.

So you might ask, why couldn't I put totally different reverbs on each and every instrument in the mix? Well go ahead and try it. But I bet you won't like it.
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