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Monitoring High Frequencies
Old 28th September 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Monitoring High Frequencies

Hey, ive been having this issue for a long time and It takes me alot of time to work around. Im not sure if its my monitors or what but my high end on my mixes always sounds really messy and not focused at all. I currently have a pair of gen 1 Rokit 5s, they are less than spectacular but other music sounds decent on them so it could just be me being complicated. I bought a DB meter and Ive been monitoring at -75 db and Im starting to wonder if thats not loud enough. Any advice for getting a tighter top end? Thanks in advance everyone.
Old 28th September 2019
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by SelfPerception View Post
Hey, ive been having this issue for a long time and It takes me alot of time to work around. Im not sure if its my monitors or what but my high end on my mixes always sounds really messy and not focused at all. I currently have a pair of gen 1 Rokit 5s, they are less than spectacular but other music sounds decent on them so it could just be me being complicated. I bought a DB meter and Ive been monitoring at -75 db and Im starting to wonder if thats not loud enough. Any advice for getting a tighter top end? Thanks in advance everyone.
Mixing, its freaking hard and takes many things people are unaware of.

I would start with tuning your room. If your room is not tuned, you are not hearing the true sounds of what you are mixing. So how would you ever know what to do, if you are not hearing the true actual; sounds??

Then I would train my ears to the room. A tuned room is not enough, your ears need training as well. In essence, you need to learn what 3.5kHz sounds like compared to 2.5kHz. If you boost and/or cut the wrong frequency, your mix will suffer and that can be the difference between a 3.5 or 2.5kHz, as an example.

Compression is a tool that can useful and can be your downfall, if you do not know what each setting does on it. Learn the tools used for mixing and your ears and that knowledge will guide you to a great mix in due time.

Arrangement of a song is important with this issue

Other things i would do is learn how to create frequency space for every instrument track in your mix, so they subside in their own frequency space. This process you need to learn is called complimentary EQ techniques. Also cutting is 'sometimes' far more better than boosting in these cases. Less is more and more is more..

Other other things is to create a 3D space for your mix, so instruments are not just center, left and right. A good mix will have instruments coming form the far back left, mid center, front center, front right, 45% middle left and so on..

There is no special formula for these things and they are no specific things to do with these things. Its an art, just like a painting. Each painting need different colors, brush strokes and painting techniques. Same goes for mixing a song, each mix will need different processes done to it, according to how your source tracks sound, your personnel preferences and the end goal of the sound you want for that specific mix.

CJ
Old 28th September 2019
  #3
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Murky Waters's Avatar
 

Monitor at varying levels, from barely audible to pumping. Consider using some good headphones additionally. The Rockit's are not ideal for dealing with a smeary high end, but it is possible once you learn their sound, I suppose. For tracks that are primarily high-frequency, hats, cymbals, etc., high pass judiciously. Low pass what has limited or unnecessary HF content.
Old 1st October 2019
  #4
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decocco's Avatar
 

You should monitor at a level that is comfortable for you. I think this will vary depending on the type of music you do and personal taste. It should not sound quiet or loud to you but rather just right.

What exactly is not right with your top end? For example, maybe your mixes always end up sounding dull, or the piano is dull while the cymbals are harsh, etc.

Last edited by decocco; 1st October 2019 at 03:10 PM.. Reason: I done learnt ta spell!
Old 1st October 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Check out this google link.

The second item is a PDF of the article. It will help.
Old 1st October 2019
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Thank you for the recommendations everyone, I'm learning something new every time I sit down and get to work. Ive discovered that my biggest issue was a lack of mid range, causing me to attempt to try and draw out too much energy in the high end. Easy enough of a fix. Will need to invest in better monitors soon, I have really outgrown these.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SelfPerception View Post
Thank you for the recommendations everyone, I'm learning something new every time I sit down and get to work. Ive discovered that my biggest issue was a lack of mid range, causing me to attempt to try and draw out too much energy in the high end. Easy enough of a fix. Will need to invest in better monitors soon, I have really outgrown these.
Interesting and strange, that a five inch "monitor" would be shy in the mids.
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