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How to capture thicker sound through guitar amp recordings?
Old 17th September 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
 

How to capture thicker sound through guitar amp recordings?

As the question said.. I struggle to capture a warmer, more full bodied sound through my guitar recordings. I know I don't use a tube amp, so I won't be able to get the same warmth, but I run my strat through a bass amp and get some pleasing, thick sounds in the room.

The problem is when I mic it up I just get the attack without much oomph. It ends up pretty stale. Is it an eq or mic placement issue? Or is it just the way guitar amps translate to recording?

Using an sm58.. I'm prepping for recording an album and may end up using a studio amp, but I want to know how to achieve a better guitar recording for live and personal use.
Old 17th September 2019
  #2
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammusicnow View Post
As the question said.. I struggle to capture a warmer, more full bodied sound through my guitar recordings. I know I don't use a tube amp, so I won't be able to get the same warmth, but I run my strat through a bass amp and get some pleasing, thick sounds in the room.

The problem is when I mic it up I just get the attack without much oomph. It ends up pretty stale. Is it an eq or mic placement issue? Or is it just the way guitar amps translate to recording?

Using an sm58.. I'm prepping for recording an album and may end up using a studio amp, but I want to know how to achieve a better guitar recording for live and personal use.
Part of the sound you are hearing is the sound of the room. When you mic close up it is a very direct sound. Try placing the mic back away from the amp. Low frequencies need more room to move as well.

Also a 58 is not the best mic to use. Try a good LDC or a ribbon mic. Ribbons and LDC's with figure 8 pick up patterns work well cause you get a direct sound and some of the room sound from the back side of the mic.
Old 17th September 2019
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sammusicnow View Post
As the question said.. I struggle to capture a warmer, more full bodied sound through my guitar recordings. I know I don't use a tube amp, so I won't be able to get the same warmth, but I run my strat through a bass amp and get some pleasing, thick sounds in the room.

The problem is when I mic it up I just get the attack without much oomph. It ends up pretty stale. Is it an eq or mic placement issue? Or is it just the way guitar amps translate to recording?

Using an sm58.. I'm prepping for recording an album and may end up using a studio amp, but I want to know how to achieve a better guitar recording for live and personal use.
Hi, SM58 has huge bass boost when used close to the source. This might work OK for certain percussion, bass mic'ing, drums, but wouldn't sound good on guitar.

SM57 are pretty goods, E609 mic has a warmer sound with less bight.

I've found I like the sm57 more with distortion, e609 more with cleaner guitar sounds.

With a sm58 you can try pulling the mic 2" to 2 foot away. This will affect the bass boost/proximity effect.

Also if you are getting hard room sounds (off-axis reflections from walls, etc,) you can try placing a chair or something else by your mic/cab and draping sheets or blankes over them to cut down on room harshness.
https://www.soundonsound.com/techniq...reducing-spill
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Quote:
How to capture thicker sound through guitar amp recordings?
The problem is when I mic it up I just get the attack without much oomph. It ends up pretty stale. Is it an eq or mic placement issue? Or is it just the way guitar amps translate to recording?
A few things to consider and experimenter with:
1.) Mic placement. 1/4" left, right, back forward makes a world of difference in sound
2.) Speaker selection, select the right speaker to mic. Not all speakers in the same cabinet are the same. Fine the best sounding one and mix that one
3.) Your room. You need to acoustically treat it. Then Find the best sounding spot in your room and move the amp/cabinet there
4.) Sometimes 2 mics are good, sometimes not. I would stay with one mic, to keep it simple for you. Because then you need to deal with phase and you are not ready for that.
5.) Mic selection. Get an SM57, its a standard mic and has recorded thousands of great guitars in thousands of songs you have heard.
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