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Volume Fader setting for recording
Old 7th September 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Volume Fader setting for recording

Hi when initially starting to record say a guitar track, (wet) what is the ideal fader volume setting to begin with, so I am not recording to hot or to cold? so as to achieve plenty of headroom.
Old 7th September 2019
  #2
Gear Maniac
 
Lunar Attic's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevie F View Post
Hi when initially starting to record say a guitar track, (wet) what is the ideal fader volume setting to begin with, so I am not recording to hot or to cold? so as to achieve plenty of headroom.
Assuming you're talking about the track fader in your DAW, just leave it at unity gain as it has no effect on your actual recording level.

Recording levels are set with the input gain knob on your interface. Most interfaces will provide a visual reference of input level by way of LEDs. Keep it on the conservative side; Green is good. Yellow is a warning. Orange or red is probably too hot.

In digital there is no such thing as 'recording too cold', you can always increase the gain in your DAW whereas the damage done by recording 'too hot' can not be undone.

T
Old 7th September 2019
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunar Attic View Post
Assuming you're talking about the track fader in your DAW, just leave it at unity gain as it has no effect on your actual recording level.

Recording levels are set with the input gain knob on your interface. Most interfaces will provide a visual reference of input level by way of LEDs. Keep it on the conservative side; Green is good. Yellow is a warning. Orange or red is probably too hot.

In digital there is no such thing as 'recording too cold', you can always increase the gain in your DAW whereas the damage done by recording 'too hot' can not be undone.

T
Thank you for that so is the master fader the same ,set at zero ( unity ) it's just that I am getting some tracks high in volume and I am having to select shift/ hilite the tracks and bring them down by up to 10 DB. then I can increase the track that needs more volume to aiming for - 6 regards Stevie f

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Old 7th September 2019
  #4
Gear Nut
 
Garage Rodeo's Avatar
 

It seems to me -15 or less is a good goal. By the time you add drums, bass and other instruments, you can be close to clipping. Is it a miced gtr amp? If not, if you use an amp simulator, it will add a lot of volume afterwards to a dry guitar track.
I think a good rule of thumb, if there are drums, those should be under -12, then set everything from there. You can always turn things up.
Old 7th September 2019
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
ventil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevie F View Post
I am getting some tracks high in volume and I am having to select shift/ hilite the tracks and bring them down by up to 10 DB.
That's not uncommon.

But do leave the master fader at unity if at all possible. Otherwise you can end up constantly chasing levels and setting up improper gain staging.

If you are just about finished with the mix, and then realize it's 2 or 3 dB high or low overall, then it would be appropriate to adjust the master fader.
Old 12th September 2019
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevie F View Post
Hi when initially starting to record say a guitar track, (wet) what is the ideal fader volume setting to begin with, so I am not recording to hot or to cold? so as to achieve plenty of headroom.
If you are talking about the fader in the DAW, it doesn't matter as that fader doesn't effect the recording signals strength.

In 24bit recording, you cna have the PEAK dB anywhere between -20dB and -10dB PEAK. Ware in that range depends on dynamics and others things, but that range is a good standard as it leaves 10dB for your occasional peaks without clipping and ruining your recording take.

Bottom line is you do not needs to record hot in 24bit recording.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #7
Lives for gear
 
FreshProduce's Avatar
I've been told by many industry engineers over the years -6 is as hot as you should ever go initially on the way in
Old 4 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Guru
 

Just don't clip the converters. Half of it is no more complicated than that. -10dBFS or -6dBFS or -3dBFS doesn't really matter. Don't clip the converters when recording.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevie F View Post
Hi when initially starting to record say a guitar track, (wet) what is the ideal fader volume setting to begin with, so I am not recording to hot or to cold? so as to achieve plenty of headroom.
This article may help you.

https://mixedbymarcmozart.com/2014/1...k-account-mix/
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