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Radiohead The Numbers
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

Radiohead The Numbers

Hi All,

Just found this amazing recording by Radiohead. (Recording produced and mixed by Nigel Godrich)



I'm interested to know peoples opinion on what gear would have likely been used to obtain this warm and glued sound. It's amazing!

What equipment and techniques do you think were involved to achieve this warm sound?

Cheers!
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Gear Nut
 

A single, hard-to-find outboard box called the T-alent




Sorry. Couldn’t help it
Old 1 week ago
  #3
it all starts with the source, get talent and record it, there's no secret techniques that will give you the radiohead sound.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Gear Head
 



Yes, this is a great song, and the guys playing made a good composition and have truck loads of musical TALENT!

However, so does the engineer who produced it to sound this way. That's what I'm interested in here.

For instance you can hear analog distortion, tape hiss, stereo width and stable phasing, compression, panning, eq'ing. All the edges of each instrument sound wooly and warm, rounded, and each sound is meshed together.

The engineer created that soundscape and probably had unlimited budget to choose the best equipment to get him there. So what do you think he used?

Only having three instruments (2 x guitars and a dum machine) creates a lot of space for each instrument to sit in it's own space, which I think is part of the magic, however there is some heavy processing going on here in this track.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
then why ask, you already know how it was done...
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Here for the gear
 

You can also get a good feel by listening to the stems that Radiohead have released in the past. I was surprised by the apparent simplicity, for the lack of a better term, of the individual tracks for Nude. The performances are organic with ebb and flow as opposed to mechanically perfect but sterile. As others have stated, they dial in the sound they want and in my opinion record it faithfully and efficiently. Sure there's signal processing but it doesn't drive the process. Their root is alternative rock so they know to make do with little and juxtapose Lo-Fi and Hi-Fi aesthetics (both in rock and electronic). Last but not least, they've honed their instincts over two decades.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Gear Head
 

Thanks for the tip to listen to the stems, definitely good to hear each track isolated.

Noticed there is a significant amount of hiss on these stems. Do you think that would be as a result of the 2" tape used?

You think they hit the tape input really hard to get that distorted sound in the peaks?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcM7ADareRk

Really interested in the processing techniques that Nigel might apply.

In this guitar stem, there's a great stereo spread sound, you can really hear something special when you listen to it in good headphones.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diF7NfK5i2k

What do you think is the recording or mixing technique to achieve this sound?
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Gear Addict
 
ThorSouthshire's Avatar
Up until the most recent record Nigel would record the whole band sessions live to tape, cut each section of the song and paste the best parts together forming a whole. There's not long since they gave away many of these tape bits in deluxe packages of the latest record I think?
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonnevis View Post
Thanks for the tip to listen to the stems, definitely good to hear each track isolated.

Noticed there is a significant amount of hiss on these stems. Do you think that would be as a result of the 2" tape used?

You think they hit the tape input really hard to get that distorted sound in the peaks?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcM7ADareRk

Really interested in the processing techniques that Nigel might apply.

In this guitar stem, there's a great stereo spread sound, you can really hear something special when you listen to it in good headphones.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diF7NfK5i2k

What do you think is the recording or mixing technique to achieve this sound?
I’m a bit puzzled. I hear strong hiss and a bit of bleed, but once the bass/guitar is playing the hiss disappears.

I’m no expert at all compared to the rest of you guys, but wouldn’t you normally have a gate so the background noise is only noticeable when you are playing?

Or is it heavy compression giving this effect? I would think that tape background hiss would be constant and not affected by compression?

Maybe it’s just YouTube?
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Gear Nut
 

On a more philosophical perspective: So perhaps the availability of +256 tracks, a myriad of eq’s, compressors and effects, 7 mics + direct in & amplitube* on a single guitar etc makes it harder for us to just make a good judgment and select the simple way that works?

Maybe we should all force ourselves to limit our choices? Limit a song to 24 tracks. Delete 80% of our plugins. And so on...

* ok. Maybe I’m over exaggerating a bit her
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