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Techniques for managing spread, "swell" and vertical "layering" of reverb?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
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Techniques for managing spread, "swell" and vertical "layering" of reverb?

Okay so lately I've started to think about mixing properly. I can do comp and EQ pretty well, also chorus/phaser type things, but something that causes a lot of confusion is "manipulation" of reverb.

From a reverb unit I get some "image". But what if I want to adjust it's "spread"/wideness, how it layers relative to "upfront" sounds or how it "swells" with time.

Should I use:

-volume and EQ automation on the wet signal. And what frequencies are "psychoacoustically meaningful"? Do I need to use mid-side EQ? Something else? Should I listen to the reverb "relative to" some other track?

-what if I cannot achieve what I want from the reverb's settings? Do I need another reverb? Can I alter the reverb somehow based on "what I look for"? E.g. by adding a chorus behind the reverb or something?

What to do if I want the reverb to "follow the upfront sound tightly"? Sort of "merge" it with the dry signal? Should I side-chain comp the reverb w.r.t. the dry signal or something?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Using a reverb is one of the great ways to make a 3D stereo mix. Knowing what to do with all the reverb setting when trying to dial in your sound depends on how you understand each settings in a reverb.
Quote:
From a reverb unit I get some "image". But what if I want to adjust it's "spread"/wideness, how it layers relative to "upfront" sounds or how it "swells" with time.
For more upfront sounds, you can adjust the Pre-Delay setting. Its the space/time before you actually hear the reverb. This can make it more upfront, more richer and is great in filling in holes as well
Quote:
what if I cannot achieve what I want from the reverb's settings? Do I need another reverb?
Yes you can or you can use a different reverb sound in that same reverb, like Hall, chamber, room, plate or spring and try different reverb settings. You have over a billion combinations you can do with a reverb with all the settings available to you.

You can also try an Impulse response reverbs. They can simulate real spaces
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
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Owen L T's Avatar
You can also compress the reverb. For instance, you can side-chain it to the vocal, with a medium release time, so that while the vocals are present, the reverb level is slighly less in the mix, then gently rises in between phrases - giving the impression of a dryer vocal, but with a reverb tail the gaps more. There are endless variations on this, which is effectively using reverb as a creative tool, beyond simply providing static ambience.
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