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few mixing questions
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

few mixing questions

So im pretty new on audio engineering and i finally decided to create and account here so i got a few questions. might be stupid question but how to remove those peaks in the pictures? those peaks are coming from kick and snare but only sometimes, so what creates these? frequencies clashing together? if so how to approach? sidechain, dynamic eq? im pretty sure i dont want them to be there since they wont be any good for my mastering?

to my second question, lets say i cut all under 150hz from a snare and so because of this the peak of the instrument goes up 4db. from what i know this isnt a good thing for your mix? can i leave it like that? i could saturate but what if it was heavily saturated already? would like to know what you'd do here.

plus i would like to get more information about mixing so if you know some good sites or threads here let me know.
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Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
Peaks like that could be caused by many reasons, they could be part of the sound and no problem (it's what makes music dynamic).
But perhaps a limiter could help if you would like to have a better (flatter) picture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by architecture View Post
... lets say i cut all under 150hz from a snare and so because of this the peak of the instrument goes up 4db.
?
The only way this could happen is that the phase of the < 150Hz material is pulling down the power of higher frequencies.
Again, if it sounds better (we are talking music here) that's good, otherwise you maybe want to reduce the power there (EQ or compression).
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Quote:
might be stupid question but how to remove those peaks in the pictures? those peaks are coming from kick and snare but only sometimes, so what creates these?
The sound and the dynamics create them. But do not rely on those picture wave forms. They are only representatives of the sound.

Do not tame them just because you see them higher than the other ones, maybe its how the sound is suppose to be? Who knows, as you make judgement on how it sounds, not how a picture wav file looks.

To tame peaks, you use dynamic controlled processing effects like compressors and limiters. Read up on how to use those, as those are what can control the dynamic ranges of the wav files
Quote:
to my second question, lets say i cut all under 150hz from a snare and so because of this the peak of the instrument goes up 4db. from what i know this isnt a good thing for your mix? can i leave it like that?
No one knows if its good for your mix, as you need to hear it. Just typing frequency ranges doesn't give us any sound and you need to make judgement when listening to the snare in the entire mix.

Like i said above, you do not make judgement just by looking with your eyes at picture wave forms. Each and every snare sounds different and the same snare drum sound in 10 different mixes will sound different in all 10 mixes.

Lets not even go into personnel taste,. as 100 engineers will mix the snare differently and all 100 engineers can be correct, as you do what sounds good for you and you do what sounds good for that mix and for each instrument in that mix.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by architecture View Post
might be stupid question but how to remove those peaks in the pictures?
Are those peaks a problem when you listen to that music? If you can't hear the peaks being a problem then do you really have to worry about them?

Perhaps a better question is this: How did you discover them and why do you want to remove them?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by architecture View Post
plus i would like to get more information about mixing so if you know some good sites or threads here let me know.
The information is all out there on the internet but not all in one place, and some of it may be incorrect/ not right for you, there will be variations too. And bear in mind, there are many ways to do things/ achieve a similar result

Also, books/ textbooks

And finally, actual practice is worth a thousand words
Old 2 weeks ago
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
Are those peaks a problem when you listen to that music? If you can't hear the peaks being a problem then do you really have to worry about them?

Perhaps a better question is this: How did you discover them and why do you want to remove them?
No i dont think that they are problem while listening, but in the other hand i have done music very little time so if they were i prob wouldnt be able to hear them. And the reason that i want to remove them is that since most likely no1 can hear them, they arent adding anything to the mix, other than useless waveforms that will affect compressor and all others in the mastering. Correct me if im wrong but wouldnt removing them just make the mix slightly more balanced?

I discoreved them by using trackers and meters in master.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by architecture View Post
No i dont think that they are problem while listening, but in the other hand i have done music very little time so if they were i prob wouldnt be able to hear them. And the reason that i want to remove them is that since most likely no1 can hear them, they arent adding anything to the mix, other than useless waveforms that will affect compressor and all others in the mastering. Correct me if im wrong but wouldnt removing them just make the mix slightly more balanced?

I discoreved them by using trackers and meters in master.
Well, let me rephrase what I wrote earlier: They're a part of the mix so of course you "hear" them, but as I think you point out you might not hear them.

All I wanted to do was illustrate that a lot of beginners start looking at numbers and waveforms and see things that look 'odd' and then decide to address those things, yet there wasn't an audible problem to address to begin with. To me that's backwards in terms of how to spend one's energy and time.

As for how it affect compression: Well it'll depend on how the dynamics processing is set up. If you send it off to a mastering engineer and he can't deal with it he should probably let you know and you can then address it in the mix. If he says nothing then either it's not really a problem or he can deal with it.

So I'm not saying it's not a problem, I'm just saying it's well worth while focusing on making things sound good at whatever stage you're in, especially if you're new.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
Quote:
Correct me if im wrong but wouldnt removing them just make the mix slightly more balanced?
No, you do not rely on a picture wav form to decide on what to remove. you use your ears to do that
Quote:
and the reason that i want to remove them is that since most likely no1 can hear them,
How did you come to that conclusion? did you remove them and the dynamics and sound didn't change?

Do you know what dynamics are? If your song has a dynamic peak right there, then its needed. If you are happy with the sound, you do not need to concentrate and put your attention to the transient peaks, there there because its part of the sound. Sounds have peaks and dips, just life life. If you want squashed potato sounds, then take all your peaks out. but remember, you judge sound with your ears, not eyes
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
If you want squashed potato sounds, then take all your peaks out.
This takes us back to the start, what is the most efficient way to do that? But no i dont want to take all the peaks out, but to simply make the mix more balanced and subtle.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Quote:
This takes us back to the start, what is the most efficient way to do that? But no i dont want to take all the peaks out, but to simply make the mix more balanced and subtle.
to make a mix more balanced, you just need to mix it so its more balanced. There are a zillion million ways to go about this. If you learn your tools (everything to do with audio engineering, recording, mixing), train your ears, and give yourself years of experience, your mixes will be more balanced over time.

This question you pose doesn't have a single correct answer. There are 100000000000 wrong ways and a 100000000 correct ways for one person and those wrong ways are correct for another person because of personnel preferences and what the original sound source sounds like, the arrangement, the feel you want and others variables
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