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The only way to edit harsh consonants is volume automation?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #31
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Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I'll be sure to suggest that to my clients. I already tried asking them not to write songs with k's and t's in them, but I don't think they were paying attention.
hahaha, you need to find more diligent clients then.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #32
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Unclenny's Avatar
Carefully applied clip gain automation followed by gentle de-essing for harsh consonants and ssss's works for me.

If the offending spot sounds a bit off I can often mask it by bringing up the reverb or delay a bit, as mentioned by Brent.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #33
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johannburkard's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by goom View Post
No amount of compression on any setting with any lookahead can soften a harsh vocal consonant that pierces my ears.

I have to almost cut them out completely with automation. Am I doing it wrong?
Tried a dynamic EQ like Waves F6?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #34
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RedBaaron's Avatar
It's so effing annoying when singers over-enunciate and create that problem.

I've never found compressors or Soothe to be effective at solving it. In fact, compression and saturation often make it worse. Best thing is to steer clear of mics that are too present/ peaky in the mid to low-highs, as they tend to do that more easily.

I'll do the same as Brett to fix it --grumbling all the while at the singer's sloppy technique and the extra work it creates--except that I'll usually see the spike and just lower the volume down to below neighboring notes, rather than remove it outright. Sometimes I'll fade in right before it.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #35
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BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by goom View Post
No amount of compression on any setting with any lookahead can soften a harsh vocal consonant that pierces my ears.

I have to almost cut them out completely with automation. Am I doing it wrong?
Goom.

its best to fix these problems at the recording stage.

then you dont have to deal with them at the mixing stage.

anything else is a work around.

so go back to the tracking area and work out whats not right.

Buddha
Old 4 weeks ago
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG BUDDHA View Post
Goom.

its best to fix these problems at the recording stage.

then you dont have to deal with them at the mixing stage.

anything else is a work around.

so go back to the tracking area and work out whats not right.

Buddha
Sure, only sometimes you have 'the' performance in the bag in that faulty but fixable way, so it just needs fixing.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbvoxx View Post
My first approach is to edit the leading edge of the consonant to remove the attack, and then put a short fade up on it. This usually works for me.
That’s what I usually do, when needed. Then you can adjust the length of the fade to tailor the edit to that specific part.

If the consonants are particularly offensive and you have to cut so much that it’s noticeable, it helps to have a few doubles or alternate takes available to slip in underneath the main vocal.

So in the case of recording, if you think you have the keeper take with the right vibe and energy, just a few mistakes that need fixing, it’s still a good idea to do a few more takes anyway for editing purposes, even if you think you can fix the problems.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karloff70 View Post
Sure, only sometimes you have 'the' performance in the bag in that faulty but fixable way, so it just needs fixing.
Bro, you're not using your AKG C12 correctly. It's all your fault.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #39
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG BUDDHA View Post
Goom.

its best to fix these problems at the recording stage.

then you dont have to deal with them at the mixing stage.

anything else is a work around.

so go back to the tracking area and work out whats not right.

Buddha
Whenever someone has this kind of attitude I want to lock them in a tiny airless room with a reel of exterior production dialogue.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #40
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BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
i was giving Goom general advice, that might help him to avoid future problems.

if your tracking procedure is giving you problems in Mix land, then you need to change your tracking techniques or procedures.

of course that wont help with audio thats already been recorded poorly, but its surely something to think about.

he did ask in the original question, ( am i doing it wrong ),

so yes, if your having problems in Mix, somethings wrong, and its generally the tracking.

thanks Guys.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #41
Gear Guru
 
Karloff70's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG BUDDHA View Post
i was giving Goom general advice, that might help him to avoid future problems.

if your tracking procedure is giving you problems in Mix land, then you need to change your tracking techniques or procedures.

of course that wont help with audio thats already been recorded poorly, but its surely something to think about.

he did ask in the original question, ( am i doing it wrong ),

so yes, if your having problems in Mix, somethings wrong, and its generally the tracking.

thanks Guys.
Well, technically he asked about how to deal with the aftermath, irrespective of whether he had baked the cake himself, even. Just solution based, after the fact.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #42
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by bambamboom View Post
Soothe isn't one of those instant gratification plugins - it takes some time to really get on with it. Of particular note it can be problematic if you try to go too wide bandwidth with it.

Some tips based on how I like to use Soothe:

I often use a little bit of automation with Soothe's depth setting as opposed to set and forget.

I find it better to NOT set the mix knob at 100%. I prefer to do a less aggressive instance of soothe on vocals, but on the reverb/FX sends, will insert an additional extremely aggressive instance of soothe there.

Keep the bandwidth of each of the EQ bands as narrow as you can afford.

Hope that helps those who were initially skeptical. I love Soothe dearly and it is used on every mix. I initially was led to it after reading about the endless hours spent by Mike Shipley / Mutt Lange trying to remove harshness from their mixes on a number of very famous albums, so that you can get the type of mix where you can keep turning up the volume and it just keeps getting better, never painful. Soothe (and SurferEQ, another handy plugin) literally saves me at least an hour (sometimes more) on every mix that would otherwise be spent doing mind-numbing EQ automation and editing.
Thank you for this handy tip. I purchased Soothe and have not been able to use it effectively on vocals at all. Seems like it does more damage than good. Always increasing the harshness rather than reducing it. I tried your suggestion and did a very narrow band at 4kHz and that really helped. Definitely not a magic bullet but an improvement. I would not have thought to do this until I saw your post.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #43
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BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karloff70 View Post
how to deal with the aftermath
there are a few ways to deal with the aftermath of poor recording processes.

1. Replicate the track, and do cuts between the 2, so that only the Good audio is playing on the first track, and only the offending sections are playing on the second track.

then try additional processes on the 2nd track, to reduce the problem, including the following.

A. Reducing the tracks volume. (static reduction)

B. Static Subtractive EQ, (targeting 5 to 8k or thereabouts/wide Q)

C. Dynamic EQ, ( targeting the right frequency, and bringing the threshold down until those harsh sections are being attenuated, and then adjusting the gain output of that frequency down)

D. Tape emulations can soften audio, so thats another option.

E. Automate the track Parameters (including anything else above)

i find using 2 tracks ( Good/Bad ) makes it easier to deal with the problem, than just trying to solve it from the 1 track.

Buddha
Old 1 week ago
  #44
Gear Head
 
nambams's Avatar
 

Slow attack time on a compressor can make the consonants in the recording more exaggerated than in real life when tracking.

I echo the folks doing it with edits. I'll slice just before and do a quick fade up. it's really fast when using PT shortcuts.

I've had some success using Oeksound Spiff - it does what Soothe does, but to transients. You could even try other Transient Designer type plugins.

But generally I find it quickest and most effective to do an edit.
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