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Let's get real: Do I have a bad voice?
Old 15th July 2019
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Let's get real: Do I have a bad voice?

Long story short, I'm not trained at all and don't plan to be, but I love making music and learning about production. I know my voice is not typical or pretty or good, but I want to ask here to validify if I should give up on music for good.

Thanks for the help!
Old 15th July 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Not even going to listen but I'll tell you this; every voice is different and its not the quality that matters, it's the delivery.

Also, some people have voices that match different styles traditionally, this can be used to your advantage, or ignored.

It took me a long time to just realize that I'm a baritone, plain and simple. That's what I can do well with my voice. The music I mostly make doesn't typically have a baritone voice when other people do it, but that's fine. I've written songs that have a bit more twang so they go with my voice as a result. Not country, per-se, but leaning in that direction or more like 'influenced by' so that I can write guitar parts and sing pieces that compliment each other. I think if I practiced, I could be a good crooner, but that's not my style right now.

I could never rap. I don't sound sincere when I try. I'm sure if I practiced a lot, I might be able to get something that sounds passable but I don't want to rhyme anyway. If I was really into hip-hop, I'd have to make that choice, try to be as traditional as I can or try to get creative and do a style that's unique to me.

Bob Dylan has a unique voice. If I heard one of his songs for the first time today, I would write him off as a bad singer but since I've been hearing it all my life, it makes sense in context now.

Try different styles, sing like you mean it and don't ever give up.
Old 15th July 2019
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
Not even going to listen but I'll tell you this; every voice is different and its not the quality that matters, it's the delivery.

Also, some people have voices that match different styles traditionally, this can be used to your advantage, or ignored.

It took me a long time to just realize that I'm a baritone, plain and simple. That's what I can do well with my voice. The music I mostly make doesn't typically have a baritone voice when other people do it, but that's fine. I've written songs that have a bit more twang so they go with my voice as a result. Not country, per-se, but leaning in that direction or more like 'influenced by' so that I can write guitar parts and sing pieces that compliment each other. I think if I practiced, I could be a good crooner, but that's not my style right now.

I could never rap. I don't sound sincere when I try. I'm sure if I practiced a lot, I might be able to get something that sounds passable but I don't want to rhyme anyway. If I was really into hip-hop, I'd have to make that choice, try to be as traditional as I can or try to get creative and do a style that's unique to me.

Bob Dylan has a unique voice. If I heard one of his songs for the first time today, I would write him off as a bad singer but since I've been hearing it all my life, it makes sense in context now.

Try different styles, sing like you mean it and don't ever give up.
Thats so true about Dylan!
Did people give you honest feedback about your singing and voice prior to realizing your kind of tone and best genre leanings?
Old 15th July 2019
  #4
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badmark's Avatar
+ 1 on the advice above. I've fronted bands and done backing vocals in others but my voice ain't nothing special (have occasionally rapped, ahem).

Never had singing lessons, a couple of months ago I listened to this in the car and am now trying to learn from the way she seems to turn each syllable into its own shiny pebble in the river of her singing. Or something like that lol

Old 15th July 2019
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheguevara93 View Post
Thats so true about Dylan!
Did people give you honest feedback about your singing and voice prior to realizing your kind of tone and best genre leanings?
I kind of came to the realization of what works for me after recording and listening to myself a lot. It’s more fun when your work comes out at a higher quality so I’ve been shifting my expectation from what I thought I would be to where I can truthfully steer my skills.
Old 18th July 2019
  #6
Quote:
I know my voice is not typical or pretty or good, but I want to ask here to validify if I should give up on music for good.
My voice sucks, but that doesn't mean i gave up. I can play guitar and drums and produce, mix and master music for a living. You do not need a good voice to succeed in music.

If you think your voice is bad, then work harder on improving it
Old 18th July 2019
  #7
Gear Nut
 
Garage Rodeo's Avatar
 

I dont see a clip to listen to. But either way, you like it, so it's on you to not give up. If you cant sing naturally, you'll never sound like Sam Cooke.

If you practice, it mite take a couple years to be decent, I'm in the same battle. I recently started vocal lessons, which helped right away. I constantly would try not to pass out while singing acoustic, turned out I was breathing wrong. Pretty embarrassing at open mic...

When I started a couple years ago, I bought vocal warmups on iTunes and practiced those while driving, which got me started.
People have different issues with singing.
1. Pitch is the main one
2. Breathing
3. Timing this one is weird but I hear it a lot
4. Knowing chest, head, voice etc.
5. Singing out. Gets better tone

Sing in your range! If you're a barritone, dont try to be a tenor, tune down.

Be patient, practice. Lessons will expedite the journey 10 fold.
Old 18th July 2019
  #8
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheguevara93 View Post
Long story short, I'm not trained at all and don't plan to be, but I love making music and learning about production. I know my voice is not typical or pretty or good, but I want to ask here to validify if I should give up on music for good.
No one here can tell you if you should "give up music for good" or not. In fact it's kind of a weird question, because whether or not you are a great singer has very little to do with whether or not you should give up something you enjoy. I enjoy playing volleyball, but I will never be in the Olympics. Should I give it up?

Quote:
I love making music
If your goal in making music is to become a famous rock star and you are considering giving up music if you don't have the necessary ability to "make it big" then I would question how much you "love music". If you really love music, fame and fortune might still be nice, but you would not let the lack of stardom keep you away from something you love.

Quote:
I'm not trained at all and don't plan to be
This is a very short-sighted attitude, IMO. Whether your goal is to "become famous" or just to enjoy music for yourself, lessons can be huge. Nobody expects to sit down at the piano and just start playing. Why do they think vocals 'come naturally' without any training whatsoever?

Even if it is just a hobby for you, being able to accurately nail the pitches, extend your range higher and lower, sing with more power and confidence are all going to be more fun than not being able to do those things. That's what lessons can do for you.

I have heard hundreds of singers come into my studio through the years, many of them had strange or unusual voices, the voices they were born with. It has never bothered me. No voice was too strange or unusual in terms of tone or timbre or character.

People being unable to hit the pitches however, - fingernails on a blackboard for me. People running out of breath and needing to punch in in the middle of a verse - tedious for me. But this technical stuff is stuff you can always get better at. I don't know how much singer can alter what their voice sounds like but frankly I don't think that is necessary.
Old 18th July 2019
  #9
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12tone's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheguevara93 View Post
Long story short, I'm not trained at all and don't plan to be, but I love making music and learning about production. I know my voice is not typical or pretty or good, but I want to ask here to validify if I should give up on music for good.

Thanks for the help!
It never stopped Leonard Cohen.

btw, I love the way he sounds...
Old 19th July 2019
  #10
Gear Addict
 
Al Rogers's Avatar
 

To paraphrase Chet Atkins you should only decide to be a musician if you've already failed at everything else.

Chet was a terrible singer by the way but when you play guitar that well folks put up with the bad singing.
Old 19th July 2019
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
Not even going to listen but I'll tell you this; every voice is different and its not the quality that matters, it's the delivery.
? I have no idea what that means. But maybe you're defining those terms differently...

Quote:
Bob Dylan has a unique voice. If I heard one of his songs for the first time today, I would write him off as a bad singer
And rightfully so. Gifted composer, but can't sing to save his life.

Quote:
Try different styles, sing like you mean it and don't ever give up.


PS I also see no link to click on so no idea if you have a bad voice.
Old 19th July 2019
  #12
I don't think having a great voice is that important, just be yourself. Listen to some metal music, none of them care about their voice.
Old 19th July 2019
  #13
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
? I have no idea what that means. But maybe you're defining those terms differently...
Quality:
Some people just have a certain something in their voice, like a smokey female jazz vibe or similar. Some people can halfheartedly mumble out a few notes and it just sounds musical.


Delivery:
If a voice isn't naturally appealing without a ton of effort then you have to sing like you mean it. Put as much feeling as you can behind the words and inflect your message into the way you are delivering the lyrics. Tasteful vibrato, accentuating syllables, adding your personal spice to a performance, regardless of your natural tone.


Take someone like Eddie Vedder, not my favorite but not a bad singer at all.
Now imaging any Pearl Jam song without his added inflections. Get rid of all of the MMM's and OOHH's and YEAH's, he adds to the beginnings and ends of words and phrases, what would the song be like if it was just the quality of his voice without the delivery he personalizes? Not to make him completely mechanical but just more straight forward singing...

That's what I meant originally anyway.
Old 20th July 2019
  #15
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mbvoxx's Avatar
judging from the audio clip I'd say your voice is very quiet.
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