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Recording band in one room with amps in another
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Recording band in one room with amps in another

i’m setting up my apartment to record and need guidance. i’ve never stepped foot in a recording studio. i know i’m green and that’s why i’m asking for your help. i’m looking to record two electric guitars, one electric bass, and a drum kit. my apartment has four rooms (excluding bathroom): two bedrooms roughly 15’ x 15’, one “office” roughly 20’ x 20’ with a computer/audio interface/analog mixer, and an open concept kitchen and living space roughly 40’ x 20’. if i put guitar one’s cabinet in bedroom one with two mics and guitar two’s cabinet in bedroom two with two mics, DI the bass, have those three with instrument cables long enough to reach the open concept kitchen and living space where both the drum kit is mic’d and everyone can see each other, get a headphone amp so the three without amps in the room can hear themselves, in this situation am i doing the best with what i have to reduce bleed while preserving the live feel? does anyone foresee any issues with this setup? thank you in advance for sharing your wisdom.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
that should work. i'm sure you'll get some sort of bleed over but it will be manageable.
any vocals?
Any reason they can't be tracked separately?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dethbyoogabooga View Post
that should work. i'm sure you'll get some sort of bleed over but it will be manageable.
any vocals?
Any reason they can't be tracked separately?
the plan is to get the songs tight then vocal scratch track whispered into a mic in the open concept kitchen and living room and fed through headphones to both prevent bleed but allow everyone to know what’s being sung?

i don’t want to track everyone separately to give the songs the live feel... i also have the soundcraft signature 22 mtk which has multitrack recording allowing me to record everything at once
Old 3 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Head
 

Your neighbors are gonna love you
Old 3 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nelsonmiller View Post
the plan is to get the songs tight then vocal scratch track whispered into a mic in the open concept kitchen and living room and fed through headphones to both prevent bleed but allow everyone to know what’s being sung?

i don’t want to track everyone separately to give the songs the live feel... i also have the soundcraft signature 22 mtk which has multitrack recording allowing me to record everything at once
Better still would be to put the vocalist in the room with you (your office, I would assume) and let your vocalist actually perform rather than whisper in to a mic in the room with everyone else. You never know what you might want to keep.

My advice would be to focus on getting solid drum takes first. Everything else is easy to re-record or punch or overdub. It's hard to go back and fix/punch/overdub drum tracks. It's also hard to get a take where everyone is satisfied with their performance. Focusing on your drummer's satisfaction will keep everything moving more quickly. Everything else is fixable.

Don't get me wrong. Record everything. Even rehearsals, because you never know. I can't tell you how many times I've heard, "f*uck! We should have recorded that!," after a band really nailed what was supposed to be a rehearsal run. They were always happy to hear that I did.

Like was said above, go ahead and count on some amount of bleed. As long as you account for it in your plans, it shouldn't be too much of an issue. Use your mic pickup patterns to your advantage as much as possible.

Good sounds at the source are easier to capture. Make sure your drummer tunes his/her/whatever drums to your space. Take time to get the guitar amps sounding good. No after-the-fact fix will sound as good as a good sounding source sound. Period.

For yourself, manage expectations. This is your first one of these. It ain't gonna sound like the radio. As long as everyone keeps that in mind, it should be cool. You will make mistakes. This is perfectly okay. As long as you are learning things to take with you into your next session (hopefully these guys will want to record a whole bunch of demos with you), and each next recording is better than the last, then you're doing the thing. It's a marathon rather than a sprint.

Other than that, good luck and have a blast. You never forget your first time.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #6
Gear Nut
 

your guitar cables are unbalanced. long cable runs should be balanced to avoid signal loss. so you will need to think about that.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
Lives for gear
20’ for an unbalanced cable is usually good. That should work in the room dimensions you are in.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

Worst case, you could always try inserting a buffer at the half-way point of the run. Boss tuner pedals work nicely for this.

Mercenary Audio used to make a box for extending instrument cable runs, too. Edit: actually, it's a Little Labs product. Here it is:

https://reverb.com/item/2289573-litt...cable-extender
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