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stuck erasing everything I do Condenser Microphones
Old 9th April 2019
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Angry stuck erasing everything I do

Hello guys,


I don't really know if it's the right forum for this kind of philosophical question but It has been driving me mad since the very beggining.

I'm a singer/songwriter so I'm producing my own music as well as mixing it and no matter what do I always end up deleting things and doing them again because it's never good enough for my taste.

Whether it's the gear that don't sound as good as I wish it would or my singing is not as good as I expected, there's always something bothering me enough to try again, over and over but then i'm inevitably stuck in a vicious cycle.


The biggest obstacle is probably the recording, I can make 1000 takes of the same verse (real number) and still be unsatisfied. And I know it's not a lack of skill, not being presumptuous or anything but I have been a singing teacher, I have been singing since I was a kid and everyone around me tell me I sing well.

It's just I know how important the source recording is compared to the mix and I always find something blocking me.

For example a syllable I may have sang too loud or too low, some letters being too prominent/sharp, my accent being off, my voice lacking emotion or too rough/gritty, too slow or too fast, etc...

Mouth sounds, my voice changing tone from one sentence to another, anything even the smallest detail is enough for me to erase everything and start over.

Also i'm never sure about which way to approach my own song, I can sing it in 10 different ways, from different tones to different keys, soft throaty or hard belty, I never know which way to go.

Until it's littlerally 11 p.m and I end up voiceless by exhaustion and I can't sing anymore, so the takes get even worse and I erase them too so I'm left with nothing and my time is wasted.


I feel so helpless, like is it happening to me only or is it the curse of doing everything all by yourself ?

What's the solution ?
Old 9th April 2019
  #2
Gear Addict
 
Murky Waters's Avatar
 

If there's no mojo after 30 to 45 minutes, shut down and go do something else. Come back fresh for another crack if you have no deadline. Also, consider hiring a vocal coach and/or lubing yourself with a bottle of wine.
Old 9th April 2019
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
Hello guys,


I don't really know if it's the right forum for this kind of philosophical question but It has been driving me mad since the very beggining.

I'm a singer/songwriter so I'm producing my own music as well as mixing it and no matter what do I always end up deleting things and doing them again because it's never good enough for my taste.

Whether it's the gear that don't sound as good as I wish it would or my singing is not as good as I expected, there's always something bothering me enough to try again, over and over but then i'm inevitably stuck in a vicious cycle.


The biggest obstacle is probably the recording, I can make 1000 takes of the same verse (real number) and still be unsatisfied. And I know it's not a lack of skill, not being presumptuous or anything but I have been a singing teacher, I have been singing since I was a kid and everyone around me tell me I sing well.

It's just I know how important the source recording is compared to the mix and I always find something blocking me.

For example a syllable I may have sang too loud or too low, some letters being too prominent/sharp, my accent being off, my voice lacking emotion or too rough/gritty, too slow or too fast, etc...

Mouth sounds, my voice changing tone from one sentence to another, anything even the smallest detail is enough for me to erase everything and start over.

Also i'm never sure about which way to approach my own song, I can sing it in 10 different ways, from different tones to different keys, soft throaty or hard belty, I never know which way to go.

Until it's littlerally 11 p.m and I end up voiceless by exhaustion and I can't sing anymore, so the takes get even worse and I erase them too so I'm left with nothing and my time is wasted.

I feel so helpless, like is it happening to me only or is it the curse of doing everything all by yourself ?

What's the solution ?
It sounds as if you're being a bit too hard on yourself. And I think we've all been there. After years of doing the same things that you mention to myself--and having no finished song with vocals to show for it--I've decided to let myself off the hook a bit, and to relax. (It also helps that I recently heard some artists I admire using chord progressions and vocal expressions I would have thrown out as not being "good enough".)

You might want to post a few versions of yourself singing the song(s), and ask people here which version(s) they like best, and why. If no one mentions the "faults" you hear in your own work, then there's a pretty good chance you're the only one who hears them. (After all, this is Gearslutz, where everybody has a damn opinion, and you're entitled to it!) I've found that people here will be pretty straight with you, and if there's something they don't like, they'll let you know--especially if you ask for honest feedback of specific issues they find. (KVRaudio.com is another good site for brutally honest feedback. )

One good thing about letting others in your situation hear your recordings is that they'll offer ways to minimize the problems you (or they) hear, since they've probably been there themselves, or they've worked with others who have.

Steve
Old 10th April 2019
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Dr. Mordo's Avatar
 

If the song is strong enough, minor details are unimportant.
Old 10th April 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
 

You may just need to work with a producer, until you develop that particular skill.
Also, working on other people's material may help develop that ability to not get lost in all the details and know when good enough is good enough.
As a producer a certain maturity is required to decide that, even an accidental take or idea, is better than the one that you may have intended and to keep it.
This producer characteristic is what you seem to lack.

Working out your music with a group of musicians may also narrow down the better version(s) of your material and is, at the same time, a reality check for your expectations.
This will also force you to have your music "ready" in your mind, long before recording time.

Then at recording and mixing time you'll inevitably run into some choices and things working out or sounding a little differently than expected, but it wouldn't be such a paralizing experience.

Another strategy is to separate the songwriting and production phases more strictly, so a production (recording, mixing) never starts before the song is ready and clearly arranged (in your mind).

Success.
Old 10th April 2019
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murky Waters View Post
If there's no mojo after 30 to 45 minutes, shut down and go do something else. Come back fresh for another crack if you have no deadline. Also, consider hiring a vocal coach and/or a lubing yourself with a bottle of wine.
So I need some wine to prevent my overthinking

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
You might want to post a few versions of yourself singing the song(s), and ask people here which version(s) they like best, and why. If no one mentions the "faults" you hear in your own work, then there's a pretty good chance you're the only one who hears them. (After all, this is Gearslutz, where everybody has a damn opinion, and you're entitled to it!) I've found that people here will be pretty straight with you, and if there's something they don't like, they'll let you know--especially if you ask for honest feedback of specific issues they find. (KVRaudio.com is another good site for brutally honest feedback. )
You're probably right, I'll let people judge my samples from now on when i'm unsure, problem is, I'm always unsure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Mordo View Post
If the song is strong enough, minor details are unimportant.
What do you mean by "strong enough", do you mean if the mix is dense enough / high numbers of tracks or if the composition is well made?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prodba View Post
You may just need to work with a producer, until you develop that particular skill.
Also, working on other people's material may help develop that ability to not get lost in all the details and know when good enough is good enough.
As a producer a certain maturity is required to decide that, even an accidental take or idea, is better than the one that you may have intended and to keep it.
This producer characteristic is what you seem to lack.

...

Another strategy is to separate the songwriting and production phases more strictly, so a production (recording, mixing) never starts before the song is ready and clearly arranged (in your mind).

Success.
I agree I have a hard time judging, I seem to be able to judge other's people work a lot more easily though.

I thought about what you said at the end, maybe I need to refrain myself by having a extremely precise plan of composition+production. So for example I know I need to sing only in a very specific way at a specific moment etc.. making me commit and preventing overthinking. Thing is hard to know exactly what you want from something that is only in your head.
Old 10th April 2019
  #7
Lives for gear
 
chrischoir's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
I always end up deleting things and doing them again because it's never good enough for my taste.
If you don't do what you are doing there is a problem. You should never be satisfied.

However, you should definitely bring someone else in to help you decide what is actually good enough, this way you can finish your projects.
Old 10th April 2019
  #8
Lives for gear
 
Dr. Mordo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
What do you mean by "strong enough", do you mean if the mix is dense enough / high numbers of tracks or if the composition is well made?
I mean the composition. There are many, many utterly classic songs that are not perfectly recorded or tracked.
Old 10th April 2019
  #9
You have to be careful not to fall into the pit of self doubt and never completing songs. Finish something and move on. I think most producers never end up with something as great as they envisioned, however, by finishing it to the best of your abilities and moving on, you will still feel a sense of satisfaction. You`ll have something to show for your efforts. Plus, maybe after a couple of months when you listen to it again, you will notice the things you did right and focus on doing it again, plus the new stuff you`ve learned. It helps having a back catalog of finished music to see your progress.
Old 10th April 2019
  #10
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrischoir View Post
If you don't do what you are doing there is a problem. You should never be satisfied.

However, you should definitely bring someone else in to help you decide what is actually good enough, this way you can finish your projects.

This is my problem... I have very few friends and they only I have went far from where I live, the few people around me have literally zero interest for music.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Mordo View Post
I mean the composition. There are many, many utterly classic songs that are not perfectly recorded or tracked.
I agree but what about the performance/rendition, more often my inability to go on with a song has more to do with my way of singing / tone / vibe / etc than it has to do with the sound by itself. (but it happens)

Do you think great songs can still be made even if you mispronunce words or have strange intonations sometimes for example?
Old 10th April 2019
  #11
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deondamage View Post
You have to be careful not to fall into the pit of self doubt and never completing songs. Finish something and move on. I think most producers never end up with something as great as they envisioned, however, by finishing it to the best of your abilities and moving on, you will still feel a sense of satisfaction. You`ll have something to show for your efforts. Plus, maybe after a couple of months when you listen to it again, you will notice the things you did right and focus on doing it again, plus the new stuff you`ve learned. It helps having a back catalog of finished music to see your progress.
I'm trying to do that, I swear, but I'm paralyzed at the simple idea of coming up with an end product that is not good enough and then showing it to my relatives or even the internet and getting mocked or simply disappointing the people that have been waiting for me to release something for years.. This is so stressful.
Old 10th April 2019
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post

What's the solution ?
Stop being so fastidious

Old 10th April 2019
  #13
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
I'm paralyzed
This is so stressful.
Yes, you are paralyzed.
YOU are making this stressful when it really is not. You are imagining that the world gives a dirty sock about what you are doing. It doesn’t. So where’s the pressure and judgement you fear coming from? You have nothing to fear but fear itself. AND YOUR FEAR IS PARALYZING YOU. There is nothing out in the world that is causing this.
Your friends and relatives probably would be happy to see you produce something, but they are also unlikely to have the musical refinement and judgement to know where your stuff deserves to be compared to successful music.
If anyone notices you enough to mock you, that’s major success compared to where you are now.
You might benefit from hypnosis therapy to get you past this major sticking point. Otherwise I don’t see how you can produce anything or enjoy the process.

Last edited by Bushman; 10th April 2019 at 01:58 AM..
Old 10th April 2019
  #14
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hello people View Post
Stop being so fastidious

The worse part of the story is that you're probably somehow right.

I will try lowering my standards.. maybe it's just an ego thing, but easier to say than to do.
Old 10th April 2019
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
I'm trying to do that, I swear, but I'm paralyzed at the simple idea of coming up with an end product that is not good enough and then showing it to my relatives or even the internet and getting mocked or simply disappointing the people that have been waiting for me to release something for years.. This is so stressful.
Perfect is the enemy of good.

You will never feel your performance is "good" if you're always striving for "perfect". And in the quest to make everything perfect, you will never finish anything.

There is no need to stress. This is art--it isn't brain surgery. No one will be harmed in the slightest if you're a little too loud on one syllable in a song. In fact, no one will be harmed in the slightest if you're too loud on EVERY syllable in the song. It simply doesn't matter.

Let others assess your work, and don't worry about impressing friends or family members. I've never tried to impress mine, but I've found people literally all over the world like the stuff I've released--and many have told me so. People I don't even know and would never have considered asking their opinions if I knew them in person. But I put what I had on SoundCloud, and I've been humbled by the depth and breadth of the comments from people who genuinely like what I've done. (And you can tell they like it, because SoundCloud will tell you how many times they played it. )

Perfect is the enemy of good. Stop chasing perfect. Turn around and embrace good. It will take you much, much farther than you ever thought you'd go.

Steve
Old 10th April 2019
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
If anyone notices you enough to mock you, that’s major success compared to where you are now.
It hurts a bit thinking about this but at the same time you're right, maybe it's time for me to just start existing, no matter how bad my music is, at least I'll exist.
As of today, I have 20+ unfinished songs and probably more than a hundred ideas I can't carry out because I'm stuck and this is literally the same thing as not making music at all / being unknown.
Old 10th April 2019
  #17
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post

Let others assess your work, and don't worry about impressing friends or family members. I've never tried to impress mine, but I've found people literally all over the world like the stuff I've released--and many have told me so. People I don't even know and would never have considered asking their opinions if I knew them in person. But I put what I had on SoundCloud, and I've been humbled by the depth and breadth of the comments from people who genuinely like what I've done. (And you can tell they like it, because SoundCloud will tell you how many times they played it. )

Perfect is the enemy of good. Stop chasing perfect. Turn around and embrace good. It will take you much, much farther than you ever thought you'd go.

Steve
Reading this, I really envy you, you can't imagine how much I would like to have feedback for my songs from people all around the world. In fact this is exactly why we're making music, right ? It's our legacy, our little contribution to the world.


Really, this whole thread is really soothing, I really needed that, I'm really glad. I will do my best to change my perception of my work.

See it more like art. I guess I got too caught up with the notion of perfection. We seek a perfect pristine sound and before we can realize it we skipped Art for science.


Thank you everyone.
Old 10th April 2019
  #18
Lives for gear
I write lots of material that never makes it into a song. But I still keep it, because some little part of it may be just what I need someday.

I even still have all my cassete tape recordings from when I was a teenager.
Old 10th April 2019
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
The worse part of the story is that you're probably somehow right.

I will try lowering my standards.. maybe it's just an ego thing, but easier to say than to do.
It is ego, but don't think of it as "lowering your standards". That implies that you're somehow "settling" for a less-than acceptable performance.

In reality, your "standards" may be impossibly high, and it may be that no one could reach them. If you were to be as meticulous in your critiquing of someone else's performance as you are on your own--say, if you were going to produce that person, and your name was going on the project--you probably wouldn't accept the things you accept from others now.

There's a difference between casually/passively listening to other performers and still thinking they do a much better job than you could do. But if you were to actively and critically listen to their performances against the criteria you set for yourself, you might find they don't meet the "standards" either. It may be that no one can.

Steve
Old 10th April 2019
  #20
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

I've noticed something I wanted to mention also. Maybe I'm just mad but here it goes :


Nowadays, most of us mixing engineers, we are striving for clarity / crispness / brightness on vocals because it can cut through the mix but I've noticed that those type of vocals tend to result in takes that are full of imperfections/"signals" pulling you out of the vibe of the mix, and when I'm using darker mics or getting less detailed vocals (less transients material etc) yes it is a little veiled and less clear but suddenly the vocal takes sound a lot more musical, they sound more fluid/smooth, the ear is not disturbed by the many details/imperfections and it fits better in the mix, also you judge the take as better and so you tend to keep it, whereas overly crisp takes are really hard for me to keep because there will always be something bothering me.

I guess what I'm trying to say is :

Maybe the way to go is to record a little warmer/darker and then during the mixing process using technics to brighten it up or making it more upfront instead of trying to record extremely clear vocals and then having a really hard time finding them musical ..

Can anyone relate to what I feel ? Or is it just an false idea I'm making?
Old 10th April 2019
  #21
Lives for gear
 
Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post

I can make 1000 takes of the same verse

For example a syllable I may have sang too loud or too low, some letters being too prominent/sharp, my accent being off, my voice lacking emotion or too rough/gritty, too slow or too fast, etc...

Mouth sounds, my voice changing tone from one sentence to another, anything even the smallest detail is enough for me to erase everything and start over.
When you record, are you expecting that you are going to just sing, and that you will get that one take that works well?

ie - you do one take start to finish, you don't like it b/c of this that or the other, you do another take, no not good enough, then another...
Old 10th April 2019
  #22
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
It is ego, but don't think of it as "lowering your standards". That implies that you're somehow "settling" for a less-than acceptable performance.

In reality, your "standards" may be impossibly high.

But if you were to actively and critically listen to their performances against the criteria you set for yourself, you might find they don't meet the "standards" either. It may be that no one can.

Steve

You're right. The standard I have in my head for my raw takes is sometimes higher than finished/mastered vocals of big production.

So when I listen and compare to what I have in head, I'm so disappointed I can't wait, have the patience, to keep the take and mix it and see where it can become.

I really need a reality check up of what typical raw takes may sound like.
Old 10th April 2019
  #23
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Hayat View Post
When you record, are you expecting that you are going to just sing, and that you will get that one take that works well?

ie - you do one take start to finish, you don't like it b/c of this that or the other, you do another take, no not good enough, then another...

Yeah but I heard freddy mercury could make songs in one take...

Legends are making me look like a total ****** beside them, trying 1000 times the same part.

I'm not comparing myself to freddy at all, he was a literal god but there's a big damn difference between one take for whole song and 1000 takes for one verse...
Old 10th April 2019
  #24
Lives for gear
 
Dr. Mordo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
I agree but what about the performance/rendition, more often my inability to go on with a song has more to do with my way of singing / tone / vibe / etc than it has to do with the sound by itself. (but it happens)

Do you think great songs can still be made even if you mispronunce words or have strange intonations sometimes for example?
The melody and the chords are by far the most important elements. The vibe/mood is probly the next most important element. The closer you study the classics (before the era of computerized perfection), the more flaws you'll hear.

If I had a take with a mispronounced word, I would keep the take and punch in that one line. If I couldn't punch it in for some reason but I loved the take, I would leave it. I have let many, many guitar solos stand that had a flubbed note or two, but the solo worked so well I left it alone.

One singer I love unreservedly is Ian Astbury, and on every Cult album he leaves one moment where his voice just fails. I love that he's willing to let that imperfection shine. It makes him more human and adds personality.
Old 10th April 2019
  #25
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
Hello guys,


I don't really know if it's the right forum for this kind of philosophical question but It has been driving me mad since the very beggining.

I'm a singer/songwriter so I'm producing my own music as well as mixing it and no matter what do I always end up deleting things and doing them again because it's never good enough for my taste.

Whether it's the gear that don't sound as good as I wish it would or my singing is not as good as I expected, there's always something bothering me enough to try again, over and over but then i'm inevitably stuck in a vicious cycle.


The biggest obstacle is probably the recording, I can make 1000 takes of the same verse (real number) and still be unsatisfied. And I know it's not a lack of skill, not being presumptuous or anything but I have been a singing teacher, I have been singing since I was a kid and everyone around me tell me I sing well.

It's just I know how important the source recording is compared to the mix and I always find something blocking me.

For example a syllable I may have sang too loud or too low, some letters being too prominent/sharp, my accent being off, my voice lacking emotion or too rough/gritty, too slow or too fast, etc...

Mouth sounds, my voice changing tone from one sentence to another, anything even the smallest detail is enough for me to erase everything and start over.

Also i'm never sure about which way to approach my own song, I can sing it in 10 different ways, from different tones to different keys, soft throaty or hard belty, I never know which way to go.

Until it's littlerally 11 p.m and I end up voiceless by exhaustion and I can't sing anymore, so the takes get even worse and I erase them too so I'm left with nothing and my time is wasted.


I feel so helpless, like is it happening to me only or is it the curse of doing everything all by yourself ?

What's the solution ?
I have produced many bands, rock, pop and dance.

You don't erase a good performance with a flaw, you fix it by being a good engineer.

Your ears can hear the flaws at least , so you are better than most, but be aware that you can never make it "perfect"....

But you can make it perfect enough that the average listener thinks it is.

You just need more practice.
Old 10th April 2019
  #26
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
when I'm using darker mics or getting less detailed vocals (less transients material etc) yes it is a little veiled and less clear but suddenly the vocal takes sound a lot more musical, they sound more fluid/smooth, the ear is not disturbed by the many details/imperfections and it fits better in the mix
Can anyone relate to what I feel ? Or is it just an false idea I'm making?
Yes, that is the epiphany I had after years of using the Rode NT1a. Brighter is NOT always better, and for reasons that include yours, brighter is sometimes worse.
( the NT1a was sent out for a capsule/basket/electronics mod and seldom gets used for vocals).
Old 10th April 2019
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
I've noticed something I wanted to mention also. Maybe I'm just mad but here it goes :


Nowadays, most of us mixing engineers, we are striving for clarity / crispness / brightness on vocals because it can cut through the mix but I've noticed that those type of vocals tend to result in takes that are full of imperfections/"signals" pulling you out of the vibe of the mix, and when I'm using darker mics or getting less detailed vocals (less transients material etc) yes it is a little veiled and less clear but suddenly the vocal takes sound a lot more musical, they sound more fluid/smooth, the ear is not disturbed by the many details/imperfections and it fits better in the mix, also you judge the take as better and so you tend to keep it, whereas overly crisp takes are really hard for me to keep because there will always be something bothering me.

I guess what I'm trying to say is :

Maybe the way to go is to record a little warmer/darker and then during the mixing process using technics to brighten it up or making it more upfront instead of trying to record extremely clear vocals and then having a really hard time finding them musical ..

Can anyone relate to what I feel ? Or is it just an false idea I'm making?
In general, you might be better off recording with the "clearer" mic, since it's easier to roll off the highs after you record than it is to add "clarity" to a recording that didn't capture the transients or upper harmonics in the first place. You can use something like the Aphex Aural Exciter to add harmonics and give a recording some "presence"; certain types of saturation may help, too. But it's still easier to make something bright into something duller, than it is to do the reverse.

This probably isn't the answer you were hoping to hear, and it's more important right now that you record and be patient with yourself. If recording something a bit "darker" is easier to accept as far as the performance, then go for that, and people here will help you fix it afterward.

Steve
Old 10th April 2019
  #28
Lives for gear
 
Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sybille View Post
Yeah
Ok, try a different approach.

Sing one take, straight through, start to finish. Even if you mess up, or think to yourself that this ain't good enough - keep going. When you are done, mute that take, and do another. Again - straight through, start to finish. Then, do take three. Then four, then five, then six. Or as many as you feel you need.

When done, listen back, and take the best parts of each take to form one complete track. So, verse 1 will be from take 2, chorus 1 will be from take 3, the first two lines of verse 2 will be from take 1, the second two lines of verse 2 will be from take 5, etc.

Try that method, and see how that works.

And stop worrying about what FM, or anyone else, has done.

Cheers.
Old 10th April 2019
  #29
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
Yes, that is the epiphany I had after years of using the Rode NT1a. Brighter is NOT always better, and for reasons that include yours, brighter is sometimes worse.
( the NT1a was sent out for a capsule/basket/electronics mod and seldom gets used for vocals).


For years, I couldn't understand why people were getting crazy about warm mics, coloured preamps and compressors for vocals.


Now I know, too much clarity/details/transients makes it really hard to produce convincing vocal takes.


Warmth/Saturation really dresses your vocal take, keeping the essential good parts but erasing/gently smoothing out the sharp/disturbing imperfections.


Is that the final secret GUYS ?! Have I unlocked the gearslutz secret prize?

Tomorrow, I'll try singing in my sm7b @150 Ohm on the cloudlifter with some UAD neve preamp hard driven above it and see if it sounds more musical.


I'll upload samples.
Old 10th April 2019
  #30
Gear Maniac
 
Sybille's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post

This probably isn't the answer you were hoping to hear, and it's more important right now that you record and be patient with yourself. If recording something a bit "darker" is easier to accept as far as the performance, then go for that, and people here will help you fix it afterward.

Steve

Hahaha, indeed, please first let me start accepting myself with darker recordings.
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Chevy / Post your electronic music here
3
jlaugh87 / So Much Gear, So Little Time
8
47ceo / So Much Gear, So Little Time
5

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