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Worth upgrading? Condenser Microphones
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Worth upgrading?

Is it worth upgrading from a USB Yeti mic to a e835 + CL-1 + ur22mkii or At2020 xlr + scarlett solo? Untreated bedroom, male rapper w/ deep voice, will not allow bass traps in the bedroom, they check the room often. The two most imp pieces of gear broadband bass traps and then studio monitors. But its pointless to have monitors in a small bedroom w/o OW 705/ Rockwool/etc.

Will the average listener notice a difference in quality in my music by upgrading from the USB to a standard $100 XLR mic + interface?
IF you suggest that I should upgrade? would you recommend the e835 or AT2020 in an untreated bedroom? moving blankets only tame the high end and do nothing for the low/mid frequencies of the voice.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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CJ Mastering's Avatar
Quote:
Is it worth upgrading from a USB Yeti mic to a e835 + CL-1 + UR22mkII or AT2020 xlr + Scarlett Solo?
Its always worth upgrading form USB to Mic and Interface.

The AT2002, to me are no bueno..I'm no fan of the AT2020. You can find a better one in the same price range
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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If you're going to upgrade, upgrade. Don't just trade one piece of low end gear for others.

I cant recommend any of those USB powered interfaces. They may run OK for non powered mics, but the forum sites are loaded with people complaining they lack enough juice to support the phantom power needs of many mics. USB ports provide 5Vdc. There is no way in hell you can boost 5V up to 48Vdc and still have any current left to drive a condenser mic.

What you want is an interface that has its own power supply and doesn't simply rely on the USB port for everything.

As far as the mic types, there's a gazillion different choices available. Getting the best options for your needs is the toughest thing of all.
Its impossible to know if a mic is ideal for your voice without trying it first hand and its impossible to try out all the possibilities before you buy.
Most pro's get to know their mics by recording at a studio which has a big mic locker and with the aid of an experienced engineer can narrow down the options to get you the best tone from their selection.

Some mics are more versatile then others too. If you have a plain voice similar to just about any other singer out there a common mic will likely do just as well with your voice as it does with the majority or others. If your voice is unique then you can literally spend years buying different mics till you stumble across the right one. Take my case, I searched for 50 years trying to find the ideal mic for my voice. When you've tried hundreds of different mics and start pushing 60 you pretty much give up the quest of finding the best and simply resign to the fact you'll never find the ideal tone. Then by chance you come across a Ribbon mic for peanuts and simply needs a new ribbon. You do some recordings and find its exactly what your voice has needed for the past 50 years. Well better late then never they say. I may get a few years use before retiring.
Old 6 days ago
  #4
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrgkmc View Post
If you're going to upgrade, upgrade. Don't just trade one piece of low end gear for others.
I cant recommend any of those USB powered interfaces. They may run OK for non powered mics, but the forum sites are loaded with people complaining they lack enough juice to support the phantom power needs of many mics. USB ports provide 5Vdc. There is no way in hell you can boost 5V up to 48Vdc and still have any current left to drive a condenser mic.

What you want is an interface that has its own power supply and doesn't simply rely on the USB port for everything. As far as the mic types, there's a gazillion different choices available. Getting the best options for your needs is the toughest thing of all.
Its impossible to know if a mic is ideal for your voice without trying it first hand and its impossible to try out all the possibilities before you buy.
Most pro's get to know their mics by recording at a studio which has a big mic locker and with the aid of an experienced engineer can narrow down the options to get you the best tone from their selection.

Some mics are more versatile then others too. If you have a plain voice similar to just about any other singer out there a common mic will likely do just as well with your voice as it does with the majority or others. If your voice is unique then you can literally spend years buying different mics till you stumble across the right one. Take my case, I searched for 50 years trying to find the ideal mic for my voice. When you've tried hundreds of different mics and start pushing 60 you pretty much give up the quest of finding the best and simply resign to the fact you'll never find the ideal tone. Then by chance you come across a Ribbon mic for peanuts and simply needs a new ribbon. You do some recordings and find its exactly what your voice has needed for the past 50 years. Well better late then never they say. I may get a few years use before retiring.
I think you’ve been rewarded for staying consistent and working hard through the years. I’m happy for you. You may never retire now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
Its always worth upgrading form USB to Mic and Interface.
The AT2002, to me are no bueno..I'm no fan of the AT2020. You can find a better one in the same price range
Even for someone who mixed solely on headphones and a $20 bluetooth speaker? In an untreated bedroom. OK. You say its still beneficial to upgrade.
Old 6 days ago
  #5
Lives for gear
If you can’t treat the room, I would think that your plan to buy an 835 and an interface will improve your product.
The 835 can be used very close to your mouth and has an even cardioid pattern that won’t pick up a lot of room or unwanted sound.
The 835 is a very natural and flattering dynamic. I have used the 835 to record live vocals that have been released or, in one case, resulted in the artist being picked up for two studio albums (he used a MUCH more expensive mic in the studio, but the live 835 tracks compare fairly well with the studio vocals).
The AT2020 is not a horrible mic, but I owned one long enough to confidently NOT recommend it for your situation. It isn’t a true LDC. The capsule is smaller than a standard LDC, and it sounds smaller. The 835 is much better for your situation.
Old 4 days ago
  #6
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
If you can’t treat the room, I would think that your plan to buy an 835 and an interface will improve your product.
The 835 can be used very close to your mouth and has an even cardioid pattern that won’t pick up a lot of room or unwanted sound.
The 835 is a very natural and flattering dynamic. I have used the 835 to record live vocals that have been released or, in one case, resulted in the artist being picked up for two studio albums (he used a MUCH more expensive mic in the studio, but the live 835 tracks compare fairly well with the studio vocals).
The AT2020 is not a horrible mic, but I owned one long enough to confidently NOT recommend it for your situation. It isn’t a true LDC. The capsule is smaller than a standard LDC, and it sounds smaller. The 835 is much better for your situation.
The 835 is the dynamic I would pick partially due to reading your old posts. You said you like it over the SM58. Since you have to buy a cloudlifter anyway if buying a a dynamic, I guess i can jump the condensor budget up to an NT1. You'd still recommend the 835?
Old 4 days ago
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walterlopez8 View Post
The 835 is the dynamic I would pick partially due to reading your old posts. You said you like it over the SM58. Since you have to buy a cloudlifter anyway if buying a a dynamic, I guess i can jump the condensor budget up to an NT1. You'd still recommend the 835?
I would still highly recommend the 835. And I’ve never had to use a Cloudlifter with an 835. The only dynamics I have that sometimes need the Cloudlifter are the Audix OM7 and the Shure SM7b. The 835 has a little more gain than an SM58, and a lot more than a ribbon or the two other dynamics I named. So you shouldn’t need to buy a Cloudlifter.
Old 4 days ago
  #8
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I used to occasionally "practice record" a male barbershop quartet-with my 4 track Yamaha Minidisc recorder(!).

Anyway, I remember the Sennie 835 sounded terrific on their bass singer.
(similar voice type as Bing Crosby BTW)

So...

+1 on your 835.

Chris
Old 3 days ago
  #9
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
I would still highly recommend the 835. And I’ve never had to use a Cloudlifter with an 835. The only dynamics I have that sometimes need the Cloudlifter are the Audix OM7 and the Shure SM7b. The 835 has a little more gain than an SM58, and a lot more than a ribbon or the two other dynamics I named. So you shouldn’t need to buy a Cloudlifter.
A simple interface has enough clean gain for the 835. Thats Awesome. Thanks!
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
I used to occasionally "practice record" a male barbershop quartet-with my 4 track Yamaha Minidisc recorder(!).

Anyway, I remember the Sennie 835 sounded terrific on their bass singer.
(similar voice type as Bing Crosby BTW)

So...

+1 on your 835.

Chris
I appreciate it Chris!
Old 3 days ago
  #10
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by walterlopez8 View Post
A simple interface has enough clean gain for the 835. Thats Awesome. Thanks!

I appreciate it Chris!
There are a few interfaces that only have gain in the 40s, but most have 50 to 60 db of gain. The 835 is most often used from 1” to 4” away, so gain isn’t normally a problem.
Old 2 days ago
  #11
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CJ Mastering's Avatar
Quote:
Even for someone who mixed solely on headphones and a $20 bluetooth speaker? In an untreated bedroom. OK. You say its still beneficial to upgrade
Um Yes of course, hell yea, thats right!!!!
A better mic has nothing to do with mixing on headphones and bluetooth speakers.. A better mic will always be a better mic. What you monitor with will not effect the quality of a microphone
Old 2 days ago
  #12
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But Rosanne singing the National Anthem might! Chris
Old 2 days ago
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
There are a few interfaces that only have gain in the 40s, but most have 50 to 60 db of gain. The 835 is most often used from 1” to 4” away, so gain isn’t normally a problem.
To piggyback on that a bit and FWIW here are some specs that might save a little time (companies can often be oddly "secretive" about this, even when they spec out pretty well): Audio Interface mic gain specs (list)

The diff can be significant in some cases.
Old 2 days ago
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
Um Yes of course, hell yea, thats right!!!!
A better mic has nothing to do with mixing on headphones and bluetooth speakers.. A better mic will always be a better mic. What you monitor with will not effect the quality of a microphone
But it will affect how well you hear that quality. You're only as good as your weakest link.
Old 2 days ago
  #15
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CJ Mastering's Avatar
Quote:
But it will affect how well you hear that quality. You're only as good as your weakest link.
That is like saying that everything i mix on my B&W's, everyone will hear my B&W's. You will not hear my monito speakers, as i will not hear his headphones. I will hear his mic quality though.

A better mic is a better mic. A better mic will give you a better quality sound in general. A better mic doesn't turn into a crappy mic, just because you listen to them on headphones. Everyone has different playback systems. so i will listen to them on other things as you will do also

What he uses for monitoring doesn't effect the Quality of his hardware (gear and mic's). That would be Magic and then you would have to be burned at the cross for being a witch
Old 2 days ago
  #16
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To be a little more specific, what is used for monitoring does not directly impact the quality of the mic or any other capture. Monitoring does not change the quality of any hardware or software. Period.
If people want to say (as they often do) that monitor choice and quality affect the quality of mixes, well duh, of course! There are a whole bunch of possible arguments about monitors and headphones on that side of things. But I’ve done live capture of shows where I never was able to monitor anything on the recording side during the show. Sometimes (I want to lie and say “always”) the recording sounded great if I had great sources and equipment. Monitoring had exactly zero to do with it. And don’t say I had to use monitors to set EQ and compression on the way in. I didn’t. There are certain high pass decisions I usually make based on the mic and source, and little other EQ, and I avoid most compression or use very soft “idiot-proof” settings.
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