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I don’t understand how physical gear works for producing music
Old 6 days ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
I don’t understand how physical gear works for producing music

Apologies if this is the wrong section to post this question in.

I don’t like using software like fl studio very much and I would like to switch to a hardware method of creating music, but I don’t understand how it works. I read that kanye at one point used a Roland vs 1880 but I don’t see how this thing can be used to make music. Can someone explain to me how these things work?

Explain as if I know nothing, because I don’t. Also I don’t plan on changing my mind about using hardware over software but I’m open to it. Thank you
Old 6 days ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

Buy some synthesizers and a sampler and a sequencer,hook them up with midi leads and voila! Music!
Old 6 days ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by BingoBongo View Post
Buy some synthesizers and a sampler and a sequencer,hook them up with midi leads and voila! Music!
How much should I expect to spend on that?
Old 6 days ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 
superstupid's Avatar
 

the vs1880 is just a recorder. he probably used it to mix and record the outputs of an asr or mpc (sampler and sequencer).
Old 6 days ago
  #5
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NicolBolas View Post
Apologies if this is the wrong section to post this question in.

I don’t like using software like fl studio very much and I would like to switch to a hardware method of creating music, but I don’t understand how it works.
You "don't like using software very much" compared to what then? Perhaps you just don't like creating music, period? I wonder, how did you become so certain you will like hardware better if you have never tried it?

Quote:
I read that kanye at one point used a Roland vs 1880 but I don’t see how this thing can be used to make music. Can someone explain to me how these things work?
it works just like FL studio, but with a much smaller screen. That may sound like I am joking, but I am not really.

Instead of having unlimited tracks like a DAW, it maxes out at 18 tracks. You can put each track into record, or play with their volume and effects etc. just like FL. Instead of grabbing on-screen faders with a mouse, there is a physical fader for each channel.

Only the very major things have a dedicated physical knob on this unit. For everything else, since there is no mouse, you need to use arrow keys and jog wheels to get around and enter data. Instead of typing the number "87" into a parameter field, you might turn the black jog wheel on the right until it the value says: "87". (82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, whoops too far, go back one).

Quote:
Explain as if I know nothing, because I don’t. Also I don’t plan on changing my mind about using hardware over software but I’m open to it.
Amazing how you can already be so certain what you are going to like, when you admit you know nothing. Clearly, the only way to know if it is right for you is to get one and teach yourself how to use it. Having a knob for each function can feel like a plus. Having to navigate layers and layers of menus, sub menus and sub-sub menus for those things that do not have a 'knob' (most of them!) can feel like a minus.

Having practically no screen to look at can feel like a plus, and like a minus at the same time. This type of 'hardware' device is all-digital on the inside. It is self-contained and requires no computer, but inside, it is also software. The difference is mainly in how you "get at" the things you need to get at.

In terms of ease of use, it will entirely depend on the user. But really this is just a self-contained recorder/mixer. In terms of capability; in terms of track counts, sends, effects, the included features; and the ability to add even more features; a DAW like FL Studio wins hands-down. It's not even a contest.

Perhaps instead of a standalone DAW like the VS, you might be more interested in something that actually provided a truly different workflow - such as an MPC - where you could make beats, and then later drop that stuff into the computer for overdubs and mixing.


Old 2 days ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 
3rd Degree's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NicolBolas View Post
Apologies if this is the wrong section to post this question in.

I don’t like using software like fl studio very much and I would like to switch to a hardware method of creating music, but I don’t understand how it works. I read that kanye at one point used a Roland vs 1880 but I don’t see how this thing can be used to make music. Can someone explain to me how these things work?

Explain as if I know nothing, because I don’t. Also I don’t plan on changing my mind about using hardware over software but I’m open to it. Thank you
As said above the Roland - VS-1880 is simply a recorder. I don't recall if this was the exact model that was really popular but Roland recorders were very popular at this time.

One thing that is critical when you look up what hardware was being used is understanding why. DAW's were not widely used, even in the early 2000's and many people were using standalone recorders. DAW's were not reliable as they are today but there were limited interfaces as well. Now I used a DAW and PCI card similar to an interface, as did many other people but many professionals did not, especially with hardware samplers and synths. Also, many hardware pieces "hold over" for a few years because people just are not ready or need to upgrade to the latest and greatest things. Quite honestly, I see that mentality more with the hobbyist the professionals, so you may see a professional using some lightly outdated gear about 5 years later than when many other people moved on.

Now you may find you like an MPC or ASR 10, whatever hardware, but this recorder probably will not make your life easier in anyway compared to a DAW and an interface with enough inputs, but it also is dated. It wasn't dated at that point, however.
Old 2 days ago
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by NicolBolas View Post
How much should I expect to spend on that?
Depends, a lot of this stuff is vintage and as 3rd degree previously stated, more of hobbyists would be into these. If costs is of great concern, then you should put software back on the table.

Having grown up using sequencers, like Roland MT-128, in my opinion, having the visuality of DAW to be able to see what i'm doing makes life 1000X better.

Perhaps look at software that is all encompassing, like Propellerheads Reason, that has everything internal to the program to include, synths, samplers and recording capabilities.

The hardest part is always going to be a learning curve and going the pure hardware route will be a TON more challenging for those who do not have a background in MIDI, port and channel routing and sequencing.

It's up to you if you want to shut out software but it truly is easier.
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