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Producing a mixtape in the box (instead of DJing live)
Old 16th May 2018
  #1
Gear Head
 

Producing a mixtape in the box (instead of DJing live)

Hi there,

as you may guess correctly, I would like to make mixtapes of commercial/chart music in the box instead of mixing the things live like a DJ.
Eventually and best case, I want to send that stuff to radio stations to earn some money with it.

Because I have no big clue on how to make transitions and on what else I have to pay attention to, I would love to get advice and tips from you.

Cheers!

Best regards,

Juljan
Old 16th May 2018
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juljan View Post
Eventually and best case, I want to send that stuff to radio stations to earn some money with it.
I don't think that's how radio stations work, so you should probably just do it for other reasons.
Old 16th May 2018
  #3
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
I don't think that's how radio stations work, so you should probably just do it for other reasons.
Could be. Anyway, do you have some tips for creating mixtapes in the box?
Old 16th May 2018
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Well what do you want to do specifically? What's a "mixtape" to you?

If you just want to take a bunch of songs and play them back one after another then that's easy. Just get a DAW (or maybe even mastering software) and import all the songs you want to use. Then just lay them out on the timeline in the order you want. You can either do fade out/fade in on adjacent tracks (i.e. one stereo track per song, or a couple of tracks alternating between songs ("checker-boarded")), or you can lay them on the same track and overlap them with a crossfade (which can be customized).

For levels you can either use automation or clip gain.

I mean... does that answer your question? It seems oddly enough either so simple it's hard to answer, or vague that I'm not getting it....
Old 16th May 2018
  #5
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
Well what do you want to do specifically? What's a "mixtape" to you?

If you just want to take a bunch of songs and play them back one after another then that's easy. Just get a DAW (or maybe even mastering software) and import all the songs you want to use. Then just lay them out on the timeline in the order you want. You can either do fade out/fade in on adjacent tracks (i.e. one stereo track per song, or a couple of tracks alternating between songs ("checker-boarded")), or you can lay them on the same track and overlap them with a crossfade (which can be customized).

For levels you can either use automation or clip gain.

I mean... does that answer your question? It seems oddly enough either so simple it's hard to answer, or vague that I'm not getting it....
Thank you for answering. No, it is not that simple. :D I am definitely not new to producing but to DJing.

Of course, you can make it that simple. I would like to know more about different kinds of transitions and other stuff a DJ is doing when he is making music live at the decks.
Old 16th May 2018
  #6
Lives for gear
 

There is no "tape" in a computer.
Most radio stations have changed over to a digital format and have "Very Few" people need to operate a station any more.
They don't Buy mixes so you can forget that angle completely. If you want to do that it falls under the job role of music director who works for a station and his play lists need to be approved by one of the other production managers.

The old model used to be different people for different jobs at the bigger stations.

•Announcer. At the most basic level, an Announcer, well, announces. ...
•Chief Engineer. ...
•Maintenance Engineer. ...
•Music Director. ...
•News Director. ...
•On-Air Personalities. ...
•Production Director. ...
•Program Director.

Today with the aid of software you typically have many people doing many different jobs. At the local AM news station you may have the guy doing a talk show, there may be one engineer and one production worker on the job and maybe a few interns working. That's it in the 4th largest city in the US On weekends it may be fully automated by computer with a guy sitting around reading a magazine of surfing the net just in case something important happens. Some stations even share their hardware engineers. They don't have a full time electronics engineer there to do repairs because things simply don't break down like they did in the old days of vacuum tubes.


If you want to get into radio the study the business. Its nothing like the old Hollywood model you've seen on TV.
Its not uncommon for an owner to fill in for some DJ or salesman of some other job while a person is out for the day so you cross trrain to know a little about everyone else's jobs. (unless you're unionized and then you rick your life trying to do more then one job)

DJ's often act as sales people to advertisers and have their own sponsors for their show. Sponsors typically pay the mans salary and he has to constantly sell their products to keep that advertising money rolling in.

If its a music station, the songs played are all done on a computer program. My buddy works at a station up in the Chicago area and told me about the program years ago which was pretty much an industry standard for all radio stations to use. The program runs the business model and does everything from scheduling guests to figuring out what you should be paid, to paying the bills, making payments and billing your customers. It will even schedual your music to be played and warn you when you're running behind schedule.

If you load up a block of recordings from several different eras having all different mixes you hit one button and it processes the audio so it will play from song to song and sound good without you having to tweak the radio knob. The program has flexible searching where you can design a show based on music genre and it will put certain music you're promoting in rotation based on how many times a day you need it played. You can override it or insert your own music and it will fix the clocking issues so your commercial breaks will still happen on time.

There's a whole lot more to it but this should give you an idea of how much things have changes since the 50's and 60's when they manually built play lists. Unless You got a time machine to go back in time and offer your services what you're wanting to do doesn't exist and hasn't in a long, long time. What you hear on the radio is an illusion - what you think goes on behind the scenes doesn't exist. Allot of the DJ's out there broadcast from their homes and since they cant be seen can be wearing anything. Many of the shows are pre recorded and the only thing going on in that studio is a computer program running. you may think its some guy broadcasting live and you may even have people phoning in, but its all recorded.

You want to get into radio - learn something about it first. Chances are any great ideas you think you have, have already been thought of by someone else and they are doing it already is a far more efficient way. The days of selling music died when the recording studios did. Today its only the advertisers that matter. Without them you have no business. The Illusion of Hollywood Fame is still being projected because that's what the listeners tune in to hear, but the heyday of radio died and people still don't realize how companies have changed to stay in business. Its 90% driven by a computer program and format just like many businesses are today.

Its like my day job working for an electronics sales service company. Everyone in the company access different parts of the same computer program depending on their job. I access things like parts and purchasing of parts, shipping and things like dispatch and time cards for my employees. Sales people access the customer database and all the tools sales people use setting up appointments, accessing gear pricing, setting up sales packages and once an order is placed it automatically prints out what the warehouse needs to pull from inventory and set up for sale. It even books the date when its supposed to be delivered and tells them what kinds of issues they might have getting in there to deliver the gear.

These business programs took decades to build. They didn't pop up over night. They were written for specific industries and are supported and updated on a regular basis. If a company has specific things they want added to make their business model unique then they pay extra to have that added.

Back in the past when computers were new I remember connecting from an office to a computers main frame like an AS400 on line and you had really primitive programs you'd use to do things like order gear and parts. After that you may have had several different programs to do different things. Payroll, Dispatch for service, purchasing, shipping, and sales may have all been using different programs and you'd have to manually extract info from them all and design reports for management.

Today, you can do most of that stuff from a single program everyone uses. The Radio business has their program model which is used by their industry and it integrates with everything they do to turn a profit. You want to get into that business and make a buck, whatever you come up with has to be better then what thay are using now and since that software company has been given suggestions for improvement on a world wide basis, I don't think a newbie who hasn't evern worked in the industry yet will have something that will fit their format no less they might be willing to buy.

Lets just play it out however. You're a genius and have something that can turn a profit. So you interest them and they hire you for minimum wage. You are given the typical business clause to sign which states when you read the fine print, any intellectual ideas you develop while working for them whether it be on your time or theirs belongs to them. Why would they pay you extra for your ideas when they get them for you minimum wage salary.

All you do is mention it in a meeting, your boss steals your idea and hands it into his superiors as his idea not yours. He gets the raise and you get a pink slip if you complain about someone stealing your ideas.

This happens ALL the time in these business. I been there on more then one occasion. The old advice when you go out into the world of being wise as a fox and timid as a lamb is still the best advice to prepare you for what occurs in business. People will take a fool to the cleaners before he even knows its been done, slicker in fact, they may hose him covertly and just wait for him to quit on his own.

Another good piece of advice I got from a wise teacher. He said never expect to spend more then 5 years working for any company involved in electronics, computers entertainment. If you leave sooner you probably didn't learn enough. If you stayed longer you're likely an empty suit falling far behind the cutting edge.
In the past 45 years as an electronic tech that advice proved itself to be true more times then I can count. Trick is you got to be willing to start over from scratch numerous times with each new job. Then you may simply walk into the big spots for big pay when a company is in need.,

Need that experience on the resume even if you don't earn more them minimum wage starting out. In radio you typically have close friends and relatives children get jobs as interns. They do a little of everything to learn the ropes. (in other words they work for free just to get the experience) Then they may be given a paycheck if they carve out a spot that makes them useful and profitable. In other words, you earn your paycheck based on your work or usefulness to others. Its no different then playing music as a musician. Few musicians get paid on their first gig or even after many gigs. They have to learn what its all about and become entertaining before people are willing to pay to see them perform. Radio is a bit more structured but its still the entertainment business and seeing it from the other side isn't nearly as fun as seeing it as the person being entertained. There may be moments here and there but as a whole you better expect to be poor as a pauper for a long time if you haven't got the business savvy to take you to the top of that industry.

Last edited by wrgkmc; 16th May 2018 at 05:41 PM..
Old 20th May 2018
  #7
Gear Head
 

Thanks for the input!

- Juljan
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