The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
can you realy get a good mix by using pink noise
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
can you realy get a good mix by using pink noise

Does any have any information on mixing with pink noise.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Here for the gear
 

well pink noise is really only half of it. you need some kind of analysis software like smaart to hear the pink noise and tell you what the deal is. it dose work well if you have the stuff necessary. what i do is run a song i know well through the mixer. i make all my graphic EQ adjustments based on that song or maybe a few different ones. this will get you pretty close to flat. the more you do it, the better the result. its also a good idea to use your ears!
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
What the ¥€*# are you writing about? I've never heard of it. I can't see pink noise being a hit or leading you to better mixing.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Gear Nut
 
Animesh Raval's Avatar
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
What the ¥€*# are you writing about? I've never heard of it. I can't see pink noise being a hit or leading you to better mixing.
Its supposed to be a subliminal form of mixing involving masking everything with a blanket of pink noise then trying to make your instruments audible with all that going on. Not sure who cooked that up but I've seen it posted a few times before. I understand what they were driving at but it surely wouldn't be my first choice. All the finer details you need to hear would obviously be masked.

It actually reminds me of a method of oil painting. You can use a layer of white paint over a canvas and mix your darker color tones into the white to lighten them. You can also do the opposite and use a black background and add light colors into the black to get darker tones. The techniques are polar opposites and can produce unique results.

Personally the idea of mixing through a wall of noise would un-nerve me. I spend too many hours mixing to be bothered with it. Maybe it can be useful as a quick A/B comparison. Of course its normally used for EQ calibration and setting speaker driver levels using a dB meter but its not something you would need to have running constantly.

A much better method for beginners is to import a commercial recording and using it as a mixing comparison. Its even more ideal if you're recording a cover tune and you import the original. Getting your instruments properly position, EQ'ed, Compressed, and special effected in a mix is a snap that way.

Even better is if you import the song before you record it then play your parts to the original song. Once you have all the parts tracked you can use the original to get all your basic setting going then mute the original.

I did a bunch of recording like that years ago and I must say they actually came out sounding excellent. The only trouble areas I had were doing the drums. I'm not much of a drummer and though the drums sounded pretty good synced with the original you could hear a few hesitation playing the recording solo. I didn't go overboard trying to quantize them (which I could have easily done) I preferred to leave the human element intact which added to the realism.

I've done the drums from Keyboards, drum machines, pads and drum real drums and the method was similar in most. I can play a solid beat but when the music is more complex I'll simply multitrack the parts playing along to the original. I'll play the kick and sometimes the kick and snare together, add my High hat, cymbals, and any drum riffs on separate tracks so I can focus on getting them right without having a train wreak.

Of course many do similar things simply using samples but I'm real old school for this kind of stuff. I've also had drummers who can pull off playing to an album well and gotten many excellent drum parts that way. Its not something all drummers can pull off either. You want to test a drummers skill and separate the pros from the amateurs just record them playing along to a song. Its much more difficult then most people realize.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
wrgkmc,
Wow! Thanks for the explanation. Mixing with a blanket of pink noise playing... that's kind of intriguing.
Much of today's consumer listening is done while doing other things in every imaginable environment, so trying to get your mix elements to blend and pop as you want against a somewhat noisy background makes more sense than nonsense.
That represents a huge change from mixing in an ultra-quiet environment to put those quiet nuanced details exactly where you want, and where any tiny noise or "off" end of a reverb tail seems really important, when in fact it won't even be audible to 99.9% of listeners.
It does make me think about what's truly important in mixes today.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Lives for gear
 
nightchef's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Animesh Raval View Post
The technique described here is not really mixing with pink noise, but using pink noise at your preferred "0" level as a reference for setting track levels at the start of your mix. I get the appeal of it: for many tracks, even RMS levels vary so much that it can be a somewhat fussy and imprecise task to set the correct trim level by watching a meter. Using pink noise as a reference would take the fuss out of it. Use the meter to calibrate the noise, and then trim everything else by ear. I haven't tried it, but I'm intrigued by it.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightchef View Post
The technique described here is not really mixing with pink noise, but using pink noise at your preferred "0" level as a reference for setting track levels at the start of your mix. I get the appeal of it: for many tracks, even RMS levels vary so much that it can be a somewhat fussy and imprecise task to set the correct trim level by watching a meter. Using pink noise as a reference would take the fuss out of it. Use the meter to calibrate the noise, and then trim everything else by ear. I haven't tried it, but I'm intrigued by it.
After reading the link, I understand the concept, but it seems so much less insane and fun than mixing through a wall of pink noise, which has a romantic, "Riding the Storm Out", mixing into a headwind sort of vibe. Oh well, back to reality (or something)!
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Just run your playback level way down. Go real low. Try ranges lower than you might have expected useful.
It's sort of the inverse of 'masking, akin to 'listening from the other room.
I don't have [or use] repeatable known settings', rather see it as using various levels that suite the different perspective at the time.
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump