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How to EQ
Old 21st February 2019 | Show parent
  #121
Gear Maniac
 
would this only apply if the tracking were stereo, right, and not dual mono? Or mono tracks?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg.lazer View Post
Here’s a stereo Bus EQ tip with Darrell Thorp

YouTube
Old 21st March 2019
  #122
Here for the gear
 
Understanding EQ (For Beginners)

This video is for beginners who are just learning about EQ. Basic concepts (Sound, frequency, frequency bands, 0dB, instruments...) are explained.

here is the link

YouTube
Old 5th April 2019
  #123
Deleted 5edf3fa
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Graphic eq are of tremendous help. Blindly Sweeping is good for resonances. But sometimes there are very vague problems that need like measly 1-2dB of reduction to fix, and it's impossible to figure out by sweeping the range where something is wrong without looking at the graph... Later when your ears are trained it's less of a problem but for a beginner FabFilter stuff is invaluable.
Old 10th June 2019
  #124
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Carbinax's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
Does anyone know of any other great videos of how to eq?

Here is a great lesson on how to EQ (or at least one of the ways to eq), that I thought some newbies might appreciate:

The engineer in the video is the legend George Massenburg, he has a fantastic ear.



cheers
matt

ps. I'm going to sticky this for a while to see if we can get any more responses
pps. The point is to get a collection of videos in this thread, and not links to other sites
Great video.
I watched it cos you can never know too much or know everything.
After watching this I ended up going down the rabbithole and watching two trevor horn videos on the breakdown of Yes's "owner of a lonely heart", followed by a 1 hour 20 minute talk with Bob Power, so I picked up some great tips. Every day's a school day
Old 25th June 2019
  #125
Gear Head
 
Toobd's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
I have parametric equalizers on my Tascam 4 track cassette. They sound different compared to graphic equalizers.

How about artificial hangover or resonance circuits? You could make circuits like this using transistors.

https://od.lk/s/OV8xNjI2OTYxNDRf/Rad...1-Hangover.pdf

https://od.lk/s/OV8xNjI2OTYxNDJf/Aud...lementbass.pdf

https://od.lk/s/OV8xNjI2OTYxNDNf/Aud...-23-VarRes.PDF



https://od.lk/s/OV8xNjI2OTYxNDZf/Aud...assFig5-BW.jpg

https://od.lk/s/OV8xNjI2OTYxNDVf/Var...e_EQ_schem.jpg
Old 25th June 2019 | Show parent
  #126
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
I purchased an 8200. I got luckey and found a mint one for $3,000. One of the best EQ's ever. He designed or at least speced that unit I don't know all of it's history. It defined the term perametric EQ. My most used piece of outboard.

RIP. One of the great audio engineers of all time.
Old 21st July 2019
  #127
Here for the gear
 
If you are looking for a great free EQ, check this one out!:

Old 28th August 2019
  #128
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
Does anyone know of any other great videos of how to eq?

Here is a great lesson on how to EQ (or at least one of the ways to eq), that I thought some newbies might appreciate:

The engineer in the video is the legend George Massenburg, he has a fantastic ear.



cheers
matt

ps. I'm going to sticky this for a while to see if we can get any more responses
pps. The point is to get a collection of videos in this thread, and not links to other sites
Thanks for the share Matt. Question for you though.

Is there an easier way to find peaks to cut besides the boosting method and using your ears. On my Parametric EQ I have 7 knobs, I leave the 1st knob and 7th knob to add warmth to the low end and high end like the video mentioned. It's very time consuming to find all peaks and I seem to be using all 5 knobs (knobs 2-6 on my EQ) every single time. Sounds great... just looking for a more efficient/faster way to get things done as I'm lazy.
Old 30th August 2019 | Show parent
  #129
Gear Guru
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MixingChamp View Post
I seem to be using all 5 knobs (knobs 2-6 on my EQ) every single time. Sounds great... just looking for a more efficient/faster way to get things done as I'm lazy.
I get the feeling that if you have to constantly reach for 5 or more parametric bands to notch out peaks then something is up with the sounds you're working with... or your monitoring... or we just have 'different' ideas of what things should sound like.

It's not that I've never used that many bands, I have, but it's in all reasonable scenarios an exception, not a general thing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MixingChamp View Post
Is there an easier way to find peaks to cut besides the boosting method and using your ears.
I know it's annoying, but we're supposed to listen to whatever it is that you create, not look at it or measure it. Sometimes peaks sound 'right'. You'll know that by listening to it. So, use your ears I think.

PS: Some EQs include a spectral display overlaid on top of the EQ graph. That typically helps as long as the spectral curve response is timed to your liking.
Old 5th September 2019
  #130
Gear Maniac
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
I didn't read all the post so, if this has already been suggested - it's cause it's true -

1. Close your eyes. Great way to EQ.

2. Follow Kush Audio on YouTube Watch the Electra vid. Clariphonic too.

3. Read manuals of brands you love. Again Kush puts out some good ****.

4. Check for blogs on the brands you love.

5. Presets help.

Happy recording
Old 15th November 2019
  #131
Here for the gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
Does anyone know of any other great videos of how to eq?

Here is a great lesson on how to EQ (or at least one of the ways to eq), that I thought some newbies might appreciate:

The engineer in the video is the legend George Massenburg, he has a fantastic ear.



cheers
matt

ps. I'm going to sticky this for a while to see if we can get any more responses
pps. The point is to get a collection of videos in this thread, and not links to other sites
I was listening to this on my crappy Logitech computer speakers (easy - I'm a newbie). I couldn't really hear any of this **** he was talking about while he was making all those adjustments. I went ahead and put on my headphones (sony mdr7506) and listened again and couldn't believe how drastically different the listen was. I suddenly could hear all the changes he was making and it was amazing. Are there exercises I can do to train my ears to pick out specific frequencies like he did? I hope that makes sense =-)

Rodney
Old 15th November 2019 | Show parent
  #132
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Piedpiper's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodzilla View Post
I was listening to this on my crappy Logitech computer speakers (easy - I'm a newbie). I couldn't really hear any of this **** he was talking about while he was making all those adjustments. I went ahead and put on my headphones (sony mdr7506) and listened again and couldn't believe how drastically different the listen was. I suddenly could hear all the changes he was making and it was amazing. Are there exercises I can do to train my ears to pick out specific frequencies like he did? I hope that makes sense =-)

Rodney
First, get some better more neutral accurate headphones. Most are not, by a long shot. Second, open up any decent EQ plugin on a full range track and start sweeping through the frequencies with the gain boosted about 6dB with a Q of somewhere around 2 and notice what you hear. You'll get the hang of it pretty quickly.
Old 15th November 2019 | Show parent
  #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piedpiper View Post
First, get some better more neutral accurate headphones. Most are not, by a long shot. Second, open up any decent EQ plugin on a full range track and start sweeping through the frequencies with the gain boosted about 6dB with a Q of somewhere around 2 and notice what you hear. You'll get the hang of it pretty quickly.
Thanks for responding. Are there any entry level headphones that won't break the budget? I really don't have a lot to spend and am trying to get a basic setup for simple recording at home. If you have time would you take a look and let me know what you suggest as far as what direction to go with my limited budget?

Here is the link to my post:
Advice - Which interface should I get?

I'm planning on using Reaper unless someone convinces me otherwise. Do you know if it has a decent EQ plugin?

How do I know if a track is full range?

Is the Q the slope of the curve when boosting/cutting?

Rodney
Old 15th November 2019 | Show parent
  #134
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64gtoboy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodzilla View Post
I was listening to this on my crappy Logitech computer speakers (easy - I'm a newbie). I couldn't really hear any of this **** he was talking about while he was making all those adjustments. I went ahead and put on my headphones (sony mdr7506) and listened again and couldn't believe how drastically different the listen was. I suddenly could hear all the changes he was making and it was amazing. Are there exercises I can do to train my ears to pick out specific frequencies like he did? I hope that makes sense =-)

Rodney
There are apps and websites for ear training.
Old 15th November 2019 | Show parent
  #135
Here for the gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 64gtoboy View Post
There are apps and websites for ear training.
Awesome! Can you or anyone else recommend one (especially if it's free)?

Rodney
Old 15th November 2019 | Show parent
  #136
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Piedpiper's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodzilla View Post
Thanks for responding. Are there any entry level headphones that won't break the budget? I really don't have a lot to spend and am trying to get a basic setup for simple recording at home. If you have time would you take a look and let me know what you suggest as far as what direction to go with my limited budget?

Here is the link to my post:
Advice - Which interface should I get?

I'm planning on using Reaper unless someone convinces me otherwise. Do you know if it has a decent EQ plugin?

How do I know if a track is full range?

Is the Q the slope of the curve when boosting/cutting?

Rodney
The best "affordable" cans that I know of are the Denon AH-D2000 available only used for around $200.

Full range means that it has sounds through the entire frequency range from low bass through highs. Most relatively full arrangements will cover that ground.

Any DAW will include an EQ plugin that will do what I described. Yes, the Q is the slope of the curve. Use a bell curve boost so you're boosting only a relatively narrow range at a time while you're sweeping slowly through the frequencies.
Old 16th November 2019 | Show parent
  #137
Here for the gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piedpiper View Post
The best "affordable" cans that I know of are the Denon AH-D2000 available only used for around $200.

Full range means that it has sounds through the entire frequency range from low bass through highs. Most relatively full arrangements will cover that ground.

Any DAW will include an EQ plugin that will do what I described. Yes, the Q is the slope of the curve. Use a bell curve boost so you're boosting only a relatively narrow range at a time while you're sweeping slowly through the frequencies.
Thanks for the advice. I can't afford new headphones right now, but I'll add it to my wish list for future purchases to consider. Once I find a good deal on a used interface I'm going to get into Cakewalk and start playing around with the EQ exercise you mentioned.

Rodney
Old 16th November 2019
  #138
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Piedpiper's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
It'll be even more obvious if you boost 12dB instead of 6. After you get a feel for it, you can boost only 3dB and listen for the difference. That or less will be more likely the typical range that you'll be using to adjust. Boosting just highlights the frequency for identification. Often, cutting is a bit more common than boosting, but it can be useful to boost first to find the offending frequency that you want to cut. You may also want to experiment with low cuts aka High Pass Filter to reduce mud and clarify a track. Even Bass can sometimes benefit from a very low HPF. Also, a very high shelf boost at 20k, or higher if you are using a high sampling rate, can be useful in adding air and texture to female vocal, fiddle or flute, without adding to the sibilance or grit range which is a bit lower around 8k.

These are just some starting points to experiment with once you are in the saddle with your DAW of choice.

BTW, your Sonys are not the best, but they're not the worst, by any means.
Old 16th November 2019 | Show parent
  #139
Here for the gear
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piedpiper View Post
It'll be even more obvious if you boost 12dB instead of 6. After you get a feel for it, you can boost only 3dB and listen for the difference. That or less will be more likely the typical range that you'll be using to adjust. Boosting just highlights the frequency for identification. Often, cutting is a bit more common than boosting, but it can be useful to boost first to find the offending frequency that you want to cut. You may also want to experiment with low cuts aka High Pass Filter to reduce mud and clarify a track. Even Bass can sometimes benefit from a very low HPF. Also, a very high shelf boost at 20k, or higher if you are using a high sampling rate, can be useful in adding air and texture to female vocal, fiddle or flute, without adding to the sibilance or grit range which is a bit lower around 8k.

These are just some starting points to experiment with once you are in the saddle with your DAW of choice.

BTW, your Sonys are not the best, but they're not the worst, by any means.
Awesome! Thanks for the advice. I don't have an interface yet so I can't record anything on my own. Could I just load a random song into a track and practice on that or would it need to be raw, unaltered tracks?

Rodney
Old 17th November 2019 | Show parent
  #140
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Piedpiper's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodzilla View Post
Awesome! Thanks for the advice. I don't have an interface yet so I can't record anything on my own. Could I just load a random song into a track and practice on that or would it need to be raw, unaltered tracks?

Rodney
You're welcome! As I had said, a full range track as in a whole band can work. In actual practice, you will more likely be doing it in individual tracks, but for practice, something that exhibits all frequencies is best. You can even practice on pink noise if you want, but it'll be more meaningful on music.

Another thing that can be helpful down the line is to purchase an EQ that has a realtime frequency display such as FabFilter ProQ that shows you what you are hearing. You'll notice that there is usually a surprising amount of useless low bass rumbling below the actual notes of a singer or acoustic guitar that can be gotten rid of with a HPF to good effect. You can usually choose the steepness of the filter. I usually prefer a first order or 6dB per octave HPF which is the most gentle and consequently the most natural sounding.
Old 22nd November 2019 | Show parent
  #141
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Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodzilla View Post
Awesome! Can you or anyone else recommend one (especially if it's free)?

Rodney
Golden Ears by Dave Moulton Labs

This is the "gold" standard for audio ear training for sound engineers. Several university level engineering programs use it (Berklee College of Music is one of them) and A LOT of well known mixing and mastering engineers swear by it.

It's boring as hell... but if you follow the workbook and the audio and you practice it... it really works. It works incredibly well, actually.
Old 20th January 2020
  #142
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Velvet Elvis's Avatar
 
Thank you so much
Old 28th January 2020
  #143
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🎧 5 years
Yeah, too bad the link is worthless.
Old 4th April 2020 | Show parent
  #144
Gear Maniac
 
Articles out there tend to make suggestions as to what to use for certain instruments. Are you saying avoid those? So when I dial in the knobs, don't look at the knobs, listen to the audio while moving the knobs up and down?

Someone mentioned to me before that running anything through an induction coil eq will make things sound nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinkleToes View Post
Use your ears. Not your eyes. If you get the right sound at the source, then the need for EQ per individual track and thus the overall master track is minimal.

I made the mistake in my early days trying to copy settings people had used in online tutorials, and thinking if I used the same settings my mixes would sound great too. I was wrong!

At the end of the day, you can't polish a turd.
Old 4th April 2020 | Show parent
  #145
Gear Guru
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by slutbox View Post
Articles out there tend to make suggestions as to what to use for certain instruments. Are you saying avoid those? So when I dial in the knobs, don't look at the knobs, listen to the audio while moving the knobs up and down?
I think that was the point, yes.

There are possibly certain things that are "correct" in general, but for each individual case it may or may not be appropriate, and only you can make the decision about what you think sounds the best.

So take for example the recommendation that many give to cut lows on a bunch of instruments. That may be "true" for many in a lot of their productions, but it might not be true for all cases. You might do more harm than good if you do that on a Chamber orchestra fore example, whereas it might work just perfectly on a recording of a band where there's a lot of unnecessary low end on a bunch of instruments (other than bass, kick drum etc) and doing it makes the low end better in this case....
Old 6th April 2020 | Show parent
  #146
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Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiasnyc View Post
I think that was the point, yes.

There are possibly certain things that are "correct" in general, but for each individual case it may or may not be appropriate, and only you can make the decision about what you think sounds the best.

So take for example the recommendation that many give to cut lows on a bunch of instruments. That may be "true" for many in a lot of their productions, but it might not be true for all cases. You might do more harm than good if you do that on a Chamber orchestra fore example, whereas it might work just perfectly on a recording of a band where there's a lot of unnecessary low end on a bunch of instruments (other than bass, kick drum etc) and doing it makes the low end better in this case....
+1000...

And to add to this for slutbox...

Nobody knows what YOUR tracks sound like except for you. Someone in an article or online telling you to always "cut electric guitars at 1KHz" has no idea what your guitars sound like. Your guitars may already have very little 1KHz. Or for the style of music you are doing your guitars may NEED a lot of 1KHz to sound correct.

It's the same with any instrument. You have to first be able to hear the tonal balance of the instrument you have... and then be able to understand what tonal balance is needed for the song you are working on.

I work on a lot of different styles of music. Each style of music has it's own "recipe" for sonic balance. Someone who only mixes death metal and uses triggered or sample-replaced drum sounds and amp sim guitar sounds is not going to understand the tonal balance needed to make an acoustic jazz quartet sound "correct".

So when you read advice like "always use this piece of gear" or "always do this EQ"... take it worth a grain of salt. Because it really is specific to the recording or recordings of that person. Just by using a different microphone or even just by moving a microphone left/right/up/down/back/forward by 2 inches will negate any and all "advice" on what should be done to that instrument.

I remember Ed Cherney one time in a session I was watching, said to a few of us... "hey, do you want to see what EQ I use on this saxophone?" A bunch of us said yes... he got up, walked out into the live room, moved the mic a few inches down and came back into the control room. when he was sitting down he said, "there... I just EQ'd it." And sure enough... the sax sounded a lot better without ever touching a knob.
Old 8th April 2020
  #147
Here for the gear
 
EQ is probably your most powerful tool when it comes to mixing. Developing a relationship between your ear and the EQ moves you make will be more valuable than any single tactic. Though there are some common practices and places I like to start. If you're interested I wrote an article about it.

You can read it here: https://www.metamindmusic.com/blog/m...plified-eq-101

Cheers!

- Alex
Old 9th September 2020 | Show parent
  #148
Gear Addict
 
🎧 15 years
For some here my tutorial about how to EQ and get a propper spectral balance might be of help:

https://youtu.be/DdhGLQG9iVg

It is not for absolute beginners, you should have worked with the EQ already.

I am interested in feedbacks. I am both, a sound-engineer and a teacher at to universities. I did those Videos for my students but thought to make it public.
Let me know if there's anything that could be made better (except my english - well, that is as good as it is but not better).

Topics in the video:
- Why to train the Ear (and Inner Ear) is so important
- Why it is usually better to first clean up the mids
- Why you get best results for your spectral balance with a combination of algorhitmic and emulating EQs together with Saturators
- Why, if you are about to learn EQ's, you absolutely should turn off the analyzer.

Cheers,
Daniel
Old 15th September 2020
  #149
Gear Head
 
🎧 15 years
Not sure of videos that haven’t already been mentioned. But I could post some screenshots of EQ

Heyo,

Warren huart (from memory)has some good videos on EQ on his produce like a pro YouTube channel.

The way I learnt more than videos is by getting to watch someone more experienced than me working, and realising that they often employ similar moves on similar sources. If it helps I can upload a few screen shots from sessions I’ve worked on that show a few different eq approaches I’ve taken on certain elements?

🛸🛸🛸✌️
Old 2 days ago
  #150
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Way late to the thread but an approach that I found very useful for myself is to first listen to the source material and figure out what sound I WANT to shape. Then that gives a direction of HOW to EQ whatever it is you are working with. (I.E. EQing a kick drum for a rock sound verse a mid 70s drum kit sound require two very different EQ curves/techniques). So knowing where you want to go first REALLY helps. Then it's just a matter of learning the right techniques to achieve that sound.
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