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How to EQ
Old 20th August 2015
  #31
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This is very basic but I like to import a favourite song into Logic X and turn on the analyzer function in the eq. Just so I can see where things are sitting on the spectrum. Maybe this is not the most useful thing to be doing?

I also like to use the eq feature in iTunes when I am listening to my favourite songs. I switch between different settings (Hi-Fi, Rock, Hip-Hop, etc) but so far I find that the "Piano" setting sounds great on a lot of tracks and makes them sound very defined but I also find it to be fatiguing on the ears. When I switch back to the flat eq, I find it sounds dull for a few seconds until my ears adjust, but I would imagine that for a lot of professional recordings, everything has been optimized already, and changing the eq myself won't do any good.

Can anyone shed some light on this? And also is listening to tracks in the spectrum analyzer a waste of time?
Old 20th September 2015
  #32
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robofficial's Avatar
throw a high-pass/low cut filter to all sounds that aren't bass
Old 26th October 2015
  #33
CCP
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Spend a lot of time listening to professionally mastered songs running through an eq like Fabfilters ProQ and pay attention to frequency levels across all frequencies and you will start to see vague patterns, then apply to your mixes.
Old 13th November 2015
  #34
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Very basic but judging by the amount of time I see these questions asked..

Old 24th November 2015
  #35
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Smile Nice example

Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
Does anyone know of any other great videos of how to eq?

Here is a great lesson on how to EQ (or at least one of the ways to eq), that I thought some newbies might appreciate:

The engineer in the video is the legend George Massenburg, he has a fantastic ear.



cheers
matt

ps. I'm going to sticky this for a while to see if we can get any more responses
pps. The point is to get a collection of videos in this thread, and not links to other sites
I'm doing research for school lab and noted 2 things from this great video. 1 being the actual technique on narrowing down a particular frequency. 2 being the style which Mr. Massenburg utlizes to sort of add a control factor to his hearing in order to create a gauge to measure difference by whistling during the inspection. This video has given me a closer look at real resources to result a professional sounding mix.
Old 5th December 2015
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piedpiper View Post
With all due respect to George, does anyone else think he overdid it? I appreciate he was trying to get the piano out of the way of the vocal but it kinda raped the piano in the process...

Also, stating the obvious, I hope, but you better be damn sure your monitors are accurate, which is rarer than most people realize.
I have to agree, actually preferred the sound with the bypassed eq, just need to be a little fatter. Sounded too scooped out. But if it worked for the song, mission accomplished.
Old 4th February 2016
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
Does anyone know of any other great videos of how to eq?

Here is a great lesson on how to EQ (or at least one of the ways to eq), that I thought some newbies might appreciate:

The engineer in the video is the legend George Massenburg, he has a fantastic ear.



cheers
matt

ps. I'm going to sticky this for a while to see if we can get any more responses
pps. The point is to get a collection of videos in this thread, and not links to other sites
This was really eye opening to watch, I'm so used to relying on panning and hardly use EQ as a means to make space in the mix. Also made me realize I need some ear training.. Massenburg has an incredible ear, the stuff he was scooping and adding I didn't even notice at first.
Old 12th March 2016
  #38
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I liked the uneq'd piano better.
Old 16th March 2016
  #39
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3 part mini series on eq'ing vocals

Last edited by Retinal; 16th March 2016 at 09:39 PM..
Old 17th April 2016
  #40
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I never hear anything about EQ'ing songs/individual tracks according to the song's key. Is that because it's not something people normally do in post production, or is it just not mentioned?
For example: I have a song in E, so is it a good idea to boost the kick drum to 82.41Hz (E1), the bass to 164.81Hz (E2), the guitars to 329.63 Hz (E3), etc.?
Old 18th April 2016
  #41
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never done because it would have a horrid effect.
Old 23rd April 2016
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marginwalker View Post
I never hear anything about EQ'ing songs/individual tracks according to the song's key. Is that because it's not something people normally do in post production, or is it just not mentioned?
For example: I have a song in E, so is it a good idea to boost the kick drum to 82.41Hz (E1), the bass to 164.81Hz (E2), the guitars to 329.63 Hz (E3), etc.?
Not only is it not 'normally done' it simply has no place in mixing.

Think about it: why would you want to have a bunch of Es at different octaves jumping out all over the mix? The bass is doing its thing, playing a bass-line, but every time it hits an E - BOOM, it gets louder. Or the vocalist. Or any instrument.

Why would you want to accentuate the root note across several different octaves, and have it jumping out any time there's content at that frequency? You wouldn't.
Old 27th May 2016
  #43
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Deadsound's Avatar
 

Here are some great videos that show how to EQ in the context of the mix! SO IMPORTANT!

There are many videos out there that explain "The Theory" of EQ or "What Is EQ." Those are great but hearing and knowing how to use EQ in the mix, we feel, is much more vital to understand and practice

Check these videos out as they all explain EQ, the plugins used to EQ (so you understand how they are different tonally and functionally) and when to use different EQ types on different sources of audio.

Drums:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJoQNrk5u8g

Bass:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgl7prlbYyo

Guitars:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNr8otdRDc4

Synths/Pianos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YL8xScAdMys

Kick:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7exvF7n6PQ

Snare:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UyyrYa4eeY

Also, here is a master list of all the BEST FREE PLUGINS from 2015! Download them as there are a ton of great EQs here to help you expand on your craft!

2015 - Best Free Mixing & Mastering Plugins - Continuum Music Studio
Old 17th June 2016
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxgetz View Post
I don't know how many people actually know about this feature, but it's awesome-

On the stock PT eq3, if you hold control+shift and click on a bands frequency knob, it isolates/solos the band. Much more effective than boosting a band and sweeping that way. Obviously nothing new or groundbreaking, just didn't know it was available on the stock digi eq. Very helpful for learning frequencies and developing your ears.

As far as videos, Puremix.net has been an indispensable resource for me. They have some basic videos for free, and although most content is only available to paid subscribers, the monthly fee is extremely reasonable and to me well worth it. They do an awesome job and I'm constantly learning new techniques and ideas!
Definitely a handy tool... Have to be careful with it though as our ears adjust really fast to hearing single bands and it can throw off the overall perspective really fast.
Old 23rd June 2016
  #45
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Deadsound's Avatar
 

We just launched a whole series on you tube which shows how to use various eqs and the differences between them. Here are 2 of 7 the rest are on our channel




If you are interested in education we offer custom video courses designed for specially based on your needs.

HOME - Continuum Music Studio

Last edited by matt thomas; 28th June 2016 at 04:29 PM.. Reason: Toned back the promotion and embedded the videos correctly
Old 11th July 2016
  #46
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Cant teach you how to eq..its all about learning how to listen and reacting...capacitive resistance (cutting) always sounds better than amplification (boosting) when it comes to eqs. Depends what your eqing for: radio,club,etc ...****ty speakers arc at 16k most of the time so its common to cut 16k and above ..also most sound systems cant reach the super low frequencies so like 30 hz and below is common to cut this will give you way more head room as well because the low frequencies are what makes the vu meters jump...a lot of people are going to tell you when your in the club you can feel 15 hz or whatever but do you want to feel it and have less fidelity or a nice sounding mix . some basic tips to get you started the rest is just about getting the most transparent gear so when you do make adjustments you know its accurate..the reason eqing is hard for most people is there monitors,room,interface,cables,and sound perception from getting used to ****ty speakers is all wrong..so get the gear right ..and eqing gets a thousand times easier.
Old 16th July 2016
  #47
Eqing is all about identifying what problems there are with the tone of your sound and fixing them. After problems are fixed it can be used to enhance the audio a bit too. But dont want to go overboard. Eqing can be really easy or tricky depending on the source. Just practice and listen to a lot of professional examples while you work at it
Old 22nd July 2016
  #48
Gear Nut
 

Hey guys,good day

from me

I was ready to open a thread for below question,but s really relative with this threads & probably i am a total noob,since i cannot understand one


Even if i cut all the bad frequencies with a Fab filter EQ as an insert in my recorderd Accoustic Guitars(lets say 3 audio tracks recorded),as soon as i will send these guitars to a Group Channel track,these mud bad frequencies will still be there,why this happening,

It is supposed that since i cuted all the bad frequencies in the individual tracks Group channel should have no mud bad frequencies to cut again,


What do i not understand??????

thanks
nik
Old 22nd July 2016
  #49
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matt thomas's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by niksalonik View Post
Hey guys,good day

from me

I was ready to open a thread for below question,but s really relative with this threads & probably i am a total noob,since i cannot understand one


Even if i cut all the bad frequencies with a Fab filter EQ as an insert in my recorderd Accoustic Guitars(lets say 3 audio tracks recorded),as soon as i will send these guitars to a Group Channel track,these mud bad frequencies will still be there,why this happening,

It is supposed that since i cuted all the bad frequencies in the individual tracks Group channel should have no mud bad frequencies to cut again,


What do i not understand??????

thanks
nik
Is your send pre or post inserts?

Matt
Old 23rd July 2016
  #50
Gear Addict
I dunno, sure seems to me EQing and controlling dynamics is highly subjective and there are very few, if any, hard, fast, rules. Or, am I missing something?
Old 24th July 2016
  #51
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
Is your send pre or post inserts?

Matt
i think my EQ is pre fader,but even if i change it post still the same thing happens

I dont know if i replied correct to your question since you said send? probalby you ment the send of the individuall track to the group and not the sends and inserts

Correct? have a pic attached this might help
Attached Thumbnails
How to EQ-untitled222.jpg  
Old 2nd November 2016
  #52
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He has engineered a ton of gold records but yes I did think he was a little heavy handed this time.
Old 3rd December 2016
  #53
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Equalizing, or 'EQing', is without a shadow of a doubt the 2nd most difficult aspect of professional audio productions.

There are reasons for it.

I will explain the most important one.

If you EQ a segment, say, 250-500 Mid range frequencies, it opens up EVERYTHING else above these frequencies.

A cut of about 3 dB in the 250-320 region will free up all of the frequencies above 12 kHz.

And that is why EQing is the 2nd most difficult aspect of producing music.
Because every frequency influences some other frequency (in rare cases only 1, and from time to time (and these are the rarest of the rarest, 3)), but in 99.99% of the case it influences more than 4 others.

It is all intertwined. :-)
Old 15th December 2016
  #54
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thepulse101's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by _OFU_ View Post
Equalizing, or 'EQing', is without a shadow of a doubt the 2nd most difficult aspect of professional audio productions.

There are reasons for it.

I will explain the most important one.

If you EQ a segment, say, 250-500 Mid range frequencies, it opens up EVERYTHING else above these frequencies.

A cut of about 3 dB in the 250-320 region will free up all of the frequencies above 12 kHz.

And that is why EQing is the 2nd most difficult aspect of producing music.
Because every frequency influences some other frequency (in rare cases only 1, and from time to time (and these are the rarest of the rarest, 3)), but in 99.99% of the case it influences more than 4 others.

It is all intertwined. :-)
If EQ is the 2nd most difficult aspect, what is number 1?
Old 24th December 2016
  #55
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Bouroki's Avatar
 

I've had a mini revelation that has been working great and I'd like to share:

I used to go surgical first, notching problem areas etc... and then broad shaping second. This is the most recommended way for beginners. But my revelation is: do it the other way round. Get "the sound in your head" as quickly as possible with a broad color EQ like a 1073 emu, and THEN perform any surgery as transparently as possible i.e. tight Q's, as few bands as possible.

Reason #1 : Keeping perspective and getting a cool sound going with as fresh ears as possible. Not getting too lost in surgery only to end up tired and frustrated that everything is still sounding like ****e.

Reason #2 : Related to what _OFU_ said above. Everything is related and broad color shaping is bound to reveal new problems and hide others no matter how much surgery you've done before. So leaving surgery last will mean that you'll spend less time on things that don't really matter and more time on things that matter. More efficient.

Just another perspective. Try it
Old 2nd January 2017
  #56
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Definitely worth mentioning: filters. LP and HP filters used correctly can help a lot on a mix. After that, corrective EQ is the way to go.
Old 5th January 2017
  #57
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The Massenburg video shows the very popular "boost and sweep" method to find bad frequencies in an instrument and then cut them.

Some other respected engineers use "boost and sweep" to find the good frequencies in an instrument, and then cut those frequencies out of the other instruments in the mix.

Are these two approaches complimentary to each other? It seems like that could turn into a mess real quick to use both of those methods together.
Old 11th January 2017
  #58
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I use a EQ cheat sheet, it lists the instruments and the main frequency of them, so I know where to cut and where to leave alone when I EQ something. But that's not always the case.
Old 4th February 2017
  #59
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Ddjembe Mutombo's Avatar
 

To OP:

1. Get an EQ with no visuals. Something that is just knobs on the screen. It will force you to think with your ears. Otherwise you will be looking at cuts and boosts and thinking "is that too big?" or "is that not enough?". Waves SSL is my personal favorite EQ plug-in.

2. Get in the habit of cutting the things you don't like opposed to boosting the things you do like. When I started I mostly boosted the frequencies I liked. It left me with some thin sounding mixes. By focusing on cutting problematic frequencies, you leave more intact to fill out the mix.

3. Less is more. Having limited parameters forces you to think outside of the box. Start by mixing only with 3 bands and limited flexibility on each band (low can't pass 250, mid is 200 to 5k, high is 5k to 20k). From there increase the amount of bands and flexibility.

4. Round adjustments. In frequencies, round to 50's below 1K, and 500's above 1k. Fore cuts and boosts, round to 1.5 DB. For Q, use whole numbers. By doing this, you take a lot of unnecessary thinking out of it and you can make quicker decisions. People that are new to audio try to get "the perfect sound" by finely tweaking everything. All they are doing is wasting time as the adjustments they make usually aren't noticeable in the final mix. As you get better, you can stop rounding.

5. Get your dynamics in control before EQing. Transparent up front compression will really help with the next step.

6. Only solo EQ when you are trying to remove a highly problematic frequency (such as boxiness in the kick or ringing on the top snare head). EQing while everything is playing will help you hear how track effect each other. Usually this will help you make smaller cuts and boosts, because other tracks might help mask areas of concern,
Old 7th February 2017
  #60
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrismeraz View Post
The Massenburg video shows the very popular "boost and sweep" method to find bad frequencies in an instrument and then cut them.
Well, yes... but I think the more important take away from the video is before he reaches for the knobs.... he first "hears" the resonance up around 2KHz and then tries to hone in on it using the boost and sweep method...

Which is a lot different than someone saying "I have no idea if this instrument sounds good or bad, so I'm just going to boost and sweep and see if any frequencies pop out, and then I will cut them to make it sound good."

Ear training is always the most important thing. Hearing what you have and also hearing in your head what it should be is most important... Then it's easy to manipulate what you hear to get it to sound like what you want it to be.
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