The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
IRIS - Convert LoRes music to HiRes. VST2-plugin for Windows PCs.
Old 28th August 2020
  #1
Software IRIS - Convert LoRes music to HiRes. VST2-plugin for Windows PCs.

IRIS - Convert LoRes music to HiRes. VST2-plugin for Windows PCs.

IRIS - Convert LoRes music to HiRes. VST2-plugin for Windows PCs.-gui_iris_20200827.png

"IRIS" is a word-play on High-Resolution

This plugin may be of interest to the following types of people:
  • Musicians who would like to sell their music on 'HiRes' streaming-websites (Where competition may still be less fierce than on the bigger streaming-sites), but have not yet been able to record/mix or master their music in Hi-res.
  • Those who use a lot of samples in their music, but would like to be able to use those samples at a greater variety of playback-speeds without running into 'flat' sounding top-ends.
  • People who just want to listen to music in 'Hi-Res'. Perhaps older music-CDs that have not yet been re-released in hires-format (And maybe never will)

It is a Windows VST2 plugin in both 32 bit and 64 bit versions.

You can download the demo-plugin (A simple .dll file in a zip, so no installer, registry-bloating or exe-files. Just clean and simple manual file-handling) from here and see if it can be of any use to you:
https://jelstudio.dk/VSTplugin_IRIS/index.html

You can also read the manual and see some test-pictures of what "IRIS" does to the music-spectrum.

(In the manual I have included a step-by-step recipe on how to use IRIS, since it can be a bit tricky if you are not used to working with both lores and hires at the same time. It's a bit more involved than just loading the plugin on your audio-chain, since you need to consider sample-rates and so on)

IRIS does not spray magic or fairy-dust over your music, so obviously it can't make lores music sound exactly like true hires music, but I am not aware of any other options that comes as close to the real hires sound as IRIS.

I spent a lot of time recording hires sounds and analyzing what goes on in the upper spectrum in relation to various types of instruments.
And I think I found a pretty good mix of creating both tonal and transient upper-end material that sounds fairly realistic in relation to the lower-end you feed the plugin.

All the upper-end material is obviously artificially created based on what the plugin can 'hear' in the lower-end. So you won't suddenly have super-sonic cricket-calls in the upper-end while there is silence in the lower-end (Which you can get with real hires-recordings It's quite fascinating to experiment with really, but IRIS will not make something out of nothing)

In terms of actual plugin-operation, IRIS is very simple to use once your sample-rates are set as you want them in your sample-editor or DAW (Or whatever VST-host you might be using)

I hope the plugin may be of some use to some of you
Thanks for your time.
jacob.

PS: For those who don't know me, you can check me out on twitter, facebook and/or youtube if you want (I'm mostly into drum'n'bass/techno and alternative/indie new-wave music myself, but occasionally I even touch on some contemporary pop-music and easy-listening jazz. I'm a bit of a science-geek, so that probably reflects in the music being somewhat esoteric Oh, and one final note, now that I have this opportunity to speak to a broader audience; sadly I'm single. Just throwing it out there in case there are any female musicians/sound-engineers in the house ) :
https://twitter.com/JELSTUDIO
https://www.facebook.com/jacoblarsen.248
https://www.youtube.com/user/JELmusic
Attached Thumbnails
IRIS - Convert LoRes music to HiRes. VST2-plugin for Windows PCs.-gui_iris_20200827.png  
Old 28th August 2020
  #2
Gear Head
 
gabjam's Avatar
Fascinating, and the difference is remarkable - in a spectral plot at least. Sadly the limiting factor here is hardware (ie. my aging ears!) so I wasn't able to hear any of that synthesized 16k goodness, let alone any >22k goodness. Very interesting concept nonetheless.
Old 28th August 2020
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabjam View Post
Fascinating, and the difference is remarkable - in a spectral plot at least. Sadly the limiting factor here is hardware (ie. my aging ears!) so I wasn't able to hear any of that synthesized 16k goodness, let alone any >22k goodness. Very interesting concept nonetheless.
Thank you gabjam

Yes, the part about the ears is unfortunately out of my hands.
I'm sure some day there will be remedies for that too though
Old 28th August 2020
  #4
Here for the gear
 

Iv asked this question in a few other places/forums with varing answers and since you have mentioned it in your above description it would be great to get your opinion on it?
Why is it when i listen to my Tidal Music Master Subscription nearly every piece of music has considerably less Low-end? And it isn't just a Lpf cutting a bit of sub frequencies, there are dips everywhere below 500-600hz
My understanding of hi-res music is they are adding back the bits & samples lost in conversions but, to me it sounds like they are adding the High/Mid but removing the Low! Don't get me wrong the clarity & transparency hi-res brings back to the music is astonishing but, when i want to listen to some DnB it sound all tinny just like CD sounded to me when it first come about in comparison to my beloved Cassette & Vynal! Due to this i now listen to EDM/DnB mp3's and most other music Tidal Master which i find hard to wrap my head around!
Why is this?
Old 29th August 2020
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by SUBPHONIK View Post
Iv asked this question in a few other places/forums with varing answers and since you have mentioned it in your above description it would be great to get your opinion on it?
Why is it when i listen to my Tidal Music Master Subscription nearly every piece of music has considerably less Low-end? And it isn't just a Lpf cutting a bit of sub frequencies, there are dips everywhere below 500-600hz
My understanding of hi-res music is they are adding back the bits & samples lost in conversions but, to me it sounds like they are adding the High/Mid but removing the Low! Don't get me wrong the clarity & transparency hi-res brings back to the music is astonishing but, when i want to listen to some DnB it sound all tinny just like CD sounded to me when it first come about in comparison to my beloved Cassette & Vynal! Due to this i now listen to EDM/DnB mp3's and most other music Tidal Master which i find hard to wrap my head around!
Why is this?
I have no experience with 'Tidal', so I can't really say anything about them.

IRIS does not cut away the low end of your music though.

I'm not sure if there is more than one definition of HiRes music, but in relation to IRIS; HiRes music is simply music that has the spectrum only higher sample-rates will allow.

Think of it like this: in the old Amiga-days (Back in the 1980s and 90s ) we had 8 bit/22050 Hz (I have made tons of 'tracker' music, something most Amiga-users will know what is , with those specs. Very brutal sound, but perfect for hardcore-techno)

Now if that was today's 'standard', then what IRIS does is to convert that into 16 bit/44100 Hz (Or higher)

The 'CD' quality is HiRes compared to the 'Amiga' quality, in the same way that 24 bit/88200 Hz (Or higher) is HiRes compared to 'CD' quality.

HiRes is merely a relativistic term. Fluid if you will. It only makes sense when you relate it to some kind of 'standard' (Which currently is the 'CD' quality)
If, for example, you wanted to convert a 24 bit / 96000 Hz song into 48 bit /192000 Hz, then the latter would be the HiRes version of the first (IRIS can do that too)

I hope I didn't misunderstand your question and gave an answer to something you didn't ask about. But at least this is the understanding of 'HiRes' that I am working from
Old 29th August 2020
  #6
Gear Nut
 

While I personally couldn’t care less about “hires” audio (I’m nearing 50, so I cannot hear anything over 15Khz, and to me it is mostly a marketing thing anyway), and I am not sure I’d like a process to change my high end even below the original Nyquist in a non deterministic way (if I understand the manual correctly), this might make life hell for labels, services and people that demand “real hires”, i.e. material that was recorded in higher than base SR to begin with. Because now everyone can now take their productions that were recorded at CD resolution and sell them as “real hires” and no one will be able to tell whether it’s “real” or “fake”.
Clever product idea for the “hires” market, I gotta say, an it also features tubes, because we all know tubes sound “warmer”

But this is pretty much wasted as a plugin, as you have to upsample any material you want to process with Iris anyway, why not make it a standalone process with batch capabilities that includes an upsampling algorithm? Would make much more sense to have it all done in one step.
Old 29th August 2020
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herzton View Post
While I personally couldn’t care less about “hires” audio (I’m nearing 50, so I cannot hear anything over 15Khz, and to me it is mostly a marketing thing anyway), and I am not sure I’d like a process to change my high end even below the original Nyquist in a non deterministic way (if I understand the manual correctly), this might make life hell for labels, services and people that demand “real hires”, i.e. material that was recorded in higher than base SR to begin with. Because now everyone can now take their productions that were recorded at CD resolution and sell them as “real hires” and no one will be able to tell whether it’s “real” or “fake”.
Clever product idea for the “hires” market, I gotta say, an it also features tubes, because we all know tubes sound “warmer”
It's a bit like California breasts I suppose...
You won't find much 'ground-truth' there either.

I understand where you come from though, and the whole debate about 'real' vs 'fake'.
When you buy UHD movies, some of them are upscaled from older HD movies. One could call those 'fake UHD'.
Or 3D movies, back when that was still a thing, some of them were not filmed with real 3D cameras. One could call those 'fake 3D' (There's even a cool website listing which movie is which, so yeah it's a thing)

But it's not really anything new. People have used make-up and such for as long as they have existed.
And movies have had special fx in them for almost as long as they have existed.
And you can hardly find any singers anymore that doesn't use Melodyne auto-tune for their vocals

At the end of the day, as a musician you want the edge over other musicians, and if that means having your music available as HiRes... then what can we really do about it?

Singers aren't going to drop using Melodyne just to present their music as 'real singing', you know that
The day you can sell more records singing false tones, as real as they may be, is the day Melodyne will stop selling.

But the entire 'real vs fake' discussion is moot in the real practical commercial world of music.
If music doesn't sell or get heard by anybody, then what does it really help that it is sung, played and recorded as real as it gets? No musician can live off that.

But philosophically it's an interesting debate though
For example; the tubes, that you clearly recognize as tubes, are just colored pixels on your screen
Does that make them 'real' or 'fake'? You saw what they were, instantly, even though they aren't really actual physical tubes. How do you explain that?





Quote:
Originally Posted by Herzton View Post
But this is pretty much wasted as a plugin, as you have to upsample any material you want to process with Iris anyway, why not make it a standalone process with batch capabilities that includes an upsampling algorithm? Would make much more sense to have it all done in one step.
In Reaper, and perhaps most DAWs, the upsampling happens automatically according to what sample-rate your sound-device is set to

For example; if you run Reaper at 96 kHz, then you can simply load your song (Or collections of songs) onto the timeline and then export it/them as a 96 kHz song (With IRIS loaded onto the effect-chain of course)

In sample-editors, however, you may need to convert the sample-rate of your song first* (At least Audacity requires this for IRIS to work there. But I don't know how other sample-editors work)

*When I say 'convert it first', I obviously mean convert it inside Audacity
For some reason Audacity locks the entire audio-chain to whatever sample-rate the loaded song has. Therefore you need to do the conversion-step in Audacity first.
Maybe other sample-editors don't need this step, but I can't say without checking those.

I have only tested IRIS in Reaper and Audacity, so I only know the procedures for those 2 softwares

The reason it is not stand-alone, is because having IRIS as a VST means you can use it for simple listening to music without first converting your entire music-library.

Again, as an example; if you want to listen to some old music you have, you can just load that music onto the timeline in Reaper and play it there as it is. Having IRIS on the effect-chain will then convert the music on the fly.

If it was a stand-alone, then you would need to decide which sample-rate you would want to convert to, and then your entire library would be 'locked' at that rate and you would need to re-convert the whole library again later if you wanted a higher level later (Perhaps if you later buy a more capable computer or sound-card or something)

So, in my opinion at least, there is more flexibility in having it as a VST

And for those who want to sell music on HiRes stream sites, converted from LoRes music, well they would need to convert their music anyway, to go from LoRes to HiRes, so it's not really any extra steps.

And finally, if stand-alone; then you would be locked into whatever up-sampling algorithm was built into IRIS, where-as having it as a VST means you can choose whatever up-sampling algo you prefer

You can find a huge variety in the results of up-sampling between different converters (I have one sample-editor that creates reversed images in the top-end when you convert the sample-rate, so they're definitely not all made equal), so no reason to force a user to have only one option.

The best sample-rate converter I know of myself is Voxengo's R8brain. It can also do batch-processing if you need that.
I much prefer a modular approach like that myself, where I can choose what I consider the best tools for each step of the process
Old 29th August 2020
  #8
Gear Nut
 

Well, personally I couldn’t care less, but I think if your product takes off, there’ll be some nice heated forum discussions about “real hires” vs “fake hires” and people claiming to hear the difference and so on Fun!
I get your points about standalone vs. plugin, and you should be able to automate the process with a good audio editor anyway...
Old 29th August 2020
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herzton View Post
Well, personally I couldn’t care less, but I think if your product takes off, there’ll be some nice heated forum discussions about “real hires” vs “fake hires” and people claiming to hear the difference and so on Fun!
Well, as long as people just remember that good music is good music no matter how it's made, then I don't mind a good, even heated, discussion about 'artificiality' in music

I'm old enough to remember, vividly, when synthesizers were a hot topic and purists feared they would destroy 'true' music. But we still have both synthesizers and 'real' instruments, and much more music to choose from

In fact I remember a program on Danish national TV in the 1980s, where they had a serious (Relatively serious) intellectual debate about a drum-machine (Some type of Linn I think it was) and what it might mean to the future of music.
They had brought one into the TV-studio and made some beats on it on LIVE prime-time TV and then discussed it. Almost surreal to think about today But there you go, music is important to people (It certainly is to me, and to you as well I would imagine. That's why we're on gearslutz I guess )

Anyway, thanks for your input Herzton
Old 29th August 2020
  #10
Here for the gear
 

I'm interested in the applications of this for sound effects. In sound design we alter the pitch (via varispeed) of things to make things sound bigger... obviously if you don't have a high resolution/frequency recording then when you lower the pitch you'll get a nasty hole in the top end, causing things to sound dull. If this plug in can breathe life into pitched down recordings, it would definitely have a user base for that.

Hopefully I'll get time to try this out over the coming days...
Old 29th August 2020
  #11
I appreciate your enthusiasm. But what do these words even mean? Hi-res? Low-res? We have sample rate and bit depth. Then sample rate conversion and compression with a quite few proven algorithms. What else is there?

And you talk about Hi-res streaming websites but have no experience with Tidal!?

Sorry, it sounds like mumbo-jumbo to me. (But would be happy to be corrected if you have some meaningful info).

Last edited by thedberg; 29th August 2020 at 10:56 PM..
Old 30th August 2020
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by vectorwarrior View Post
I'm interested in the applications of this for sound effects. In sound design we alter the pitch (via varispeed) of things to make things sound bigger... obviously if you don't have a high resolution/frequency recording then when you lower the pitch you'll get a nasty hole in the top end, causing things to sound dull. If this plug in can breathe life into pitched down recordings, it would definitely have a user base for that.

Hopefully I'll get time to try this out over the coming days...
I'm biased of course, but I think it's very useful for that.

Snare-drums, cymbals, pianos and violins, were the first type of instruments I wanted to match as closely to the real ones as possible. So I did a lot of slow-motion tests with drum-beats and classical ensemble-recordings.

One of the things I would point out, is to try to minimize the background-noise as much as possible in your recordings.
I found with classical ensemble-recordings, that if they had not minimized the background-noise of the room they played in (Things such as air-condition systems, nearby street-traffic, and even fluorescent tube-buzz from room-lights), then when you slow it down it can become very noticeable.

This phenomenon is not caused by the plugin of course, but is just something I noticed while working with different playback-rates.

I had a lot of fun slowing down beats too. It's definitely possible to create some nice sounding sci-fi atmosphere this way (The slow repetitive rolling of a space-ship engine, to use behind dialogue in film. Stuff like that)



Quote:
Originally Posted by thedberg View Post
I appreciate your enthusiasm. But what do these words even mean? Hi-res? Low-res? We have sample rate and bit depth. Then sample rate conversion and compression with a quite few proven algorithms. What else is there?

And you talk about Hi-res streaming websites but have no experience with Tidal!?

Sorry, it sounds like mumbo-jumbo to me. (But would be happy to be corrected if you have some meaningful info).
I mentioned earlier that HiRes is a relativistic terms. HiRes is only meaningful when compared to something else. You can read that a few posts back

Sorry, I have never used Tidal. Maybe I will get to know it more when I begin to convert my own music (Which is why I actually did this plugin)

There is a demo you can try for exactly that reason; to circumvent any possible 'sales-mumbojumbo' you may be fearing I give you

You don't have to pay attention to my description of the plugin, but can try it yourself and see if it does anything useful to your music/sounds.
The plugin does what it does. Maybe it's not the sound or effect you're after, maybe it is.
But try it for yourself, let IRIS do the talking, so to speak, before making a judgment
Old 30th August 2020
  #13
Lives for gear
 
javahut's Avatar
Anyone can convert their lower rez files to hi rez, and then process them with any plugin that can add more top end effect or detail due to running at a higher rez. Then you would at least have the option to adjust whatever that "effect" may be to be optimal for the specfic needs of the track(s), and not just as a generic process across all tracks.

That said, most audiophiles into higher rez tracks want them as theoretically more accurate versions of originally analog recordings, or, in the case of more modern digital recordings, get closer to the higher rez original mix/master source data, as it played in the studio. In either case, this idea of converting lower rez digital source files to higher rez for the sole purpose of passing it off as a "high resolution" recording on dedicated high rez audio sites is deceitful. I could see it as legitimate if the artist or engineer felt it added specific qualities that benefitted their artistic intention. But to sell the process primarily as a way to pass off lower resolution source files as "high resolution" recordings verges on fraudulent. Especially when you know customers who buy higher rez audio are primarily doing so because they believe they're purchasing audio that's as accurate as possible to original analog recordings, or just that little bit closer to originally higher rez recording, mixing, and mastering session files.

Granted, there'd be some grey area when "re-mastering" tracks. But generally, most people assume re-mastering is a genuine attempt at making tracks objectively or subjectively "better". Whether running the tracks through a generic process designed primarily for the purpose of converting lower resolution tracks to higher resolution so you can sell them as "high resolution" audio can be considered legitimate "re-mastering", I guess could be open to interpretation. But IMO, it's disingenuous and not good for the integrity of the audio business overall.

Last edited by javahut; 30th August 2020 at 08:45 PM.. Reason: Corrected spelling.
Old 30th August 2020
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by javahut View Post
Anyone can convert their lower rez files to hi rez, and then process them with any plugin that can add more top end effect or detail due to running at a higher rez. Then you would at least have the option to adjust whatever that "effect" may be to be optimal for the specfic needs of the track(s), and not just as a generic process across all tracks.

That said, most audiofiles into higher rez tracks want them as theoretically more accurate versions of originally analog recordings, or, in the case of more modern digital recordings, get closer to the higher rez original mix/master source data, as it played in the studio. In either case, this idea of converting lower rez digital source files to higher rez for the sole purpose of passing it off as a "high resolution" recording on dedicated high rez audio sites is deceitful. I could see it as legitimate if the artist or engineer felt it added specific qualities that benefitted their artistic intention. But to sell the process primarily as a way to pass off lower resolution source files as "high resolution" recordings verges on fraudulent. Especially when you know customers who buy higher rez audio are primarily doing so because they believe they're purchasing audio that's as accurate as possible to original analog recordings, or just that little bit closer to originally higher rez recording, mixing, and mastering session files.

Granted, there'd be some grey area when "re-mastering" tracks. But generally, most people assume re-mastering is a genuine attempt at making tracks objectively or subjectively "better". Whether running the tracks through a generic process designed primarily for the purpose of converting lower resolution tracks to higher resolution so you can sell them as "high resolution" audio can be considered legitimate "re-mastering", I guess could be open to interpretation. But IMO, it's disingenuous and not good for the integrity of the audio business overall.
I don't think your view makes any sense, or that it is even fair, javahut.

First I would suggest you try the demo.

Until you actually know what IRIS does to the audio, I think it's unfair, and frankly very rude, of you to call the effect fraudulent.

It's like calling every synth-band a fraud, or bad for the music-industry, and that clearly does not make any sense.

Kraftwerk was bad for the music-industry?
Ultravox? Or Midge Ure for using Melodyne on his already amazing vocals?
Get out of here

Nobody would call a musician, band or singer disingenuous for using sound-effects that modify a 'real' instrument's sound, or a vocalist's voice (Like digital reverbs instead of using a real physical hall, or compressors instead of proper mic-technique, or auto-tuners instead of years of song-coaching, etc)

Nor would any sensible person consider music to only be true if it was recorded on analog equipment rather than digital.

The simple fact is that IRIS creates content that mimics what you could get if you did your recording, mixing and mastering using a higher sample-rate than 44.1 kHz.
Just like a synth-violin mimics a real violin.
No more, no less.

IRIS does not exist to offend you javahut. It really doesn't.
It exists to give musicians, who, for whatever reason, does not have access to expensive equipment that can handle higher sample-rates, a chance to participate in the commercial game-of-music.
Old 30th August 2020
  #15
Lives for gear
 
javahut's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEL View Post
It's like calling every synth-band a fraud, or bad for the music-industry, and that clearly does not make any sense.

Kraftwerk was bad for the music-industry?
Ultravox? Or Midge Ure for using Melodyne on his already amazing vocals?
Get out of here

Nobody would call a musician, band or singer disingenuous for using sound-effects that modify a 'real' instrument's sound, or a vocalist's voice (Like digital reverbs instead of using a real physical hall, or compressors instead of proper mic-technique, or auto-tuners instead of years of song-coaching, etc)

Just like a synth-violin mimics a real violin.
No more, no less.
This is flat-out nonsense. I listen to tons of electronic music and processed audio. Your process and advertised reasoning for the need and use of it is nothing like any of what you just compared it to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEL View Post
Nor would any sensible person consider music to only be true if it was recorded on analog equipment rather than digital.
Yeah... I never said it was.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEL View Post
It exists to give musicians, who, for whatever reason, does not have access to expensive equipment that can handle higher sample-rates, a chance to participate in the commercial game-of-music.
At $110, I'm pretty sure that's not why it exists.
Old 30th August 2020
  #16
Now I've seen the manual and web site. There's little there that makes sense.

Again: "HiRes", "LowRes", what do these words mean?
And "HiRes streaming web-sites", what's that?

And: extending the bandwidth of audio files like you show in the graphs maybe good if it's part of an over-sampling processing scheme. If not, it's as best pointless if the DA does it's job well, at worst detrimental as the high frequencies can fold down into the audio spectrum as aliasing (if I understand it correctly...).

Based on the information given, it's hard not to see it as a scam. Or at least very uniformed. But I will immediately apologize for that statement if I’m proven wrong.

Last edited by thedberg; 31st August 2020 at 07:11 AM..
Old 31st August 2020
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by javahut View Post
Your process and advertised reasoning for the need and use of it is nothing like any of what you just compared it to.
I have listed these 3 possible uses:

Musicians who would like to sell their music on 'HiRes' streaming-websites (Where competition may still be less fierce than on the bigger streaming-sites), but have not yet been able to record/mix or master their music in Hi-res.

Those who use a lot of samples in their music, but would like to be able to use those samples at a greater variety of playback-speeds without running into 'flat' sounding top-ends.

People who just want to listen to music in 'Hi-Res'. Perhaps older music-CDs that have not yet been re-released in hires-format (And maybe never will)

IRIS can do all 3, provided your audio-device supports high sample-rates of course



Quote:
Originally Posted by javahut View Post
Yeah... I never said it was.
You did imply that using synthetic means of achieving a goal was dishonest.

A digital reverb giving you synthetic 'access' to the Royal Albert Hall room-flavor, is great for those of us who can't get to record a performance in the actual Royal Albert Hall (And in most cases much cheaper)



Quote:
Originally Posted by javahut View Post
At $110, I'm pretty sure that's not why it exists.
I don't know why you need to use that snarky tone javahut. If you want to discuss economy in music-production, no problem, but at least have the courtesy to keep your tone civil.

The cheapest professional recording-studio in Hollywood will give you 3 hours for about 100$ (No engineer included)

The prices of quality audio-interfaces that can go to 32 bit / 384 kHz will cost you far more than 100$.

IRIS can convert your back-catalog to HiRes (Which can also be useful for sample-libraries). Not just your future recordings.

And also, I don't actually get 110$ per sale, if it soothes your apparently bitter soul any to know this.
That price includes sales-tax (VAT, which depends on where the buyer lives. It can range from less than 10% to almost 30%). I could have omitted it and let buyers get it as a 'fun' surprise during check-out. But I prefer to be up-front about what things cost, because that's how I prefer it when I buy plugins myself.

And even further, since I don't make enough audio-plugin sales to be eligible to register for business-tax rules, I can't deduct any expenses at all. It all goes under personal-income tax instead. And I am in the tax-bracket where I pay exactly 37.13% tax of my income (I don't know what Trump pays, but now you know what I pay )

So if I'm lucky enough to sell, say, 3 plugins, I will have between 150-200$ of net-disposable income (Under business-tax rules I would have had a lot more, but I don't advertise anywhere but Gearslutz and KVR, so that's as close to heaven as it gets I can certainly buy me a luxurious castle and steel-plated speed-boat for those money... provided it's made of LEGO and on sale in the toy-store :D )

So if your bitterness stems from being afraid IRIS will mean competition for your music (Which perhaps is marketed as 'true' HiRes), then I don't think you need to fear much
Old 31st August 2020
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedberg View Post
Now I've seen the manual and web site. There's little there that makes sense.

Again: "HiRes", "LowRes", what do these words mean?
And "HiRes streaming web-sites", what's that?

And: extending the bandwidth of audio files like you show in the graphs maybe good if it's part of an over-sampling processing scheme. If not, it's as best pointless if the DA does it's job well, at worst detrimental as the high frequencies can fold down into the audio spectrum as aliasing (if I understand it correctly...).

Based on the information given, it's hard not to see it as a scam. Or at least very uniformed. But I will immediately apologize for that statement if I’m proven wrong.
In the context of IRIS, the term 'HiRes' means going from a sample-rate of 44.1 kHz to a higher sample-rate (Anything above 44.1 kHz will be considered 'HiRes' in that context)

With the term 'HiRes-streaming websites' I am referring to those music-sites where musicians, selling music through aggregators (Such as, for example, CDbaby and distrokid), can sell music which is higher than 16 bit / 44.1 kHz (These are sites such as, for example, 'HDTracks', 'HighResAudio', 'OTOTOY', and others)

I, once again, would suggest you try the demo before calling it a scam

You can test IRIS to your heart's content and make sure of what it does before considering if it's useful to you. There is nothing magical about what IRIS does. It's just math

It tries to artificially mimic the spectrum you would otherwise only find in 'HiRes' audio-recordings.

Conceptually you could compare it to how a synthesizer can artificially mimic the sound of a real violin, or how a digital reverb can artificially mimic the atmosphere and 'room-sound' of a real physical room.

It doesn't grow hair on bald people
Old 31st August 2020
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEL View Post
In the context of IRIS, the term 'HiRes' means going from a sample-rate of 44.1 kHz to a higher sample-rate (Anything above 44.1 kHz will be considered 'HiRes' in that context)

With the term 'HiRes-streaming websites' I am referring to those music-sites where musicians, selling music through aggregators (Such as, for example, CDbaby and distrokid), can sell music which is higher than 16 bit / 44.1 kHz (These are sites such as, for example, 'HDTracks', 'HighResAudio', 'OTOTOY', and others)

I, once again, would suggest you try the demo before calling it a scam

You can test IRIS to your heart's content and make sure of what it does before considering if it's useful to you. There is nothing magical about what IRIS does. It's just math

It tries to artificially mimic the spectrum you would otherwise only find in 'HiRes' audio-recordings.

Conceptually you could compare it to how a synthesizer can artificially mimic the sound of a real violin, or how a digital reverb can artificially mimic the atmosphere and 'room-sound' of a real physical room.

It doesn't grow hair on bald people
OK. That made things slightly clearer. And yeah, the word "scam" is probably unfair. Sorry, too harsh.

Still don't understand why adding information above 22 khz as shown in the graphs is a good thing. In my understanding (possibly wrong) it's at best pointless, at worst detrimental. Well, well. Maybe I don't need to understand...
Old 31st August 2020
  #20
Here for the gear
 

I do not want to put "oil on the fire" but before criticizing the iris developer, some people on the forum , better try the plugin before giving a review. Or maybe they have "****" in their ears. Personally with an average quality headset, and even at 48khz I can hear the difference. Certainly it is subtle on some pieces of music, but on others it is obvious. Of course, if you listen to the latest "ava max" style productions, iris cannot come to the "rescue" of a bad recording .....even if i like ava max
Old 1st September 2020
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedberg View Post
OK. That made things slightly clearer. And yeah, the word "scam" is probably unfair. Sorry, too harsh.

Still don't understand why adding information above 22 khz as shown in the graphs is a good thing. In my understanding (possibly wrong) it's at best pointless, at worst detrimental. Well, well. Maybe I don't need to understand...
Thanks thedberg, no worries, peace back

The 3 types of people, who are most likely to find IRIS useful, each have different objectives. So there are different reasons why using IRIS to add high-frequency content can be a good thing for them:

1: Those who manipulate samples (To make music or sound-design, for example)

When you slow down a LoRes sample, intended for use in a song or sound that is still to exist in LoRes, you effectively cut off the high frequencies (You create a gap in the spectrum)
This doesn't happen if your sample is in HiRes.

If you do any photo- or video-editing, you may have already come across the 'raw vs jpeg' talk. It's the same principle: you (Almost always, but there are certain exceptions) want your end-resolution to be lower than your edit-resolution (This only applies to editing done in the digital domain of course, since the analog domain doesn't really have any resolution as such)

2: Those who want to reach a (Potentially) wider audience when selling their music through aggregators.

This is just like when you want to get on MTV or VEVO: you need a music-video.

It doesn't matter how good your song is. If you want to get on MTV you need a video.
And the same principle applies to HDmusic sites; your song needs to be in HiRes.

Those who record, mix and master in HiRes obviously have no need for IRIS.
But anybody who uploads their music to their aggregator in CD-quality, will not get on the HD-music websites.

I am planning to get onboard with an aggregator myself soon, and when I went through the list of sites they place the music on, I noticed 4 HD-sites, and since the monthly cost to the aggregator is the same I want to get as much out of that fee as possible.
Maybe being on those 4 HD-sites won't get my music any more traction than being on only Apple-music or Google-music, but since the purpose of using an aggregator in the first place is to get as much exposure as possible, then it's at least 4 extra chances of getting noticed by somebody who may enjoy the music

3: People who consider themselves 'audiophiles'.

Those people may have state-of-the-art listening-equipment at their homes (Like some people build home-cinema rooms in their basements) and may want to hear as much music as possible in HiRes.

While IRIS obviously creates artificial HiRes-content, it's not 'gibberish' content.
I could certainly have made IRIS inject a HiRes sample of Austrian Yodeling above 22 kHz, and make it do that no matter what content people used. THAT would be a scam.

But IRIS, to the best of my abilities, attempts to create realistic HiRes content. I did a lot of actual HiRes recordings of various types of sounds to find out what actually takes place in the higher frequencies, and then I made IRIS mimic this as well as I currently can.

But just like the violin-sound on a synthesizer may or may not sound like an authentic actual violin, there are obviously limits to what IRIS can do. Some things will be more accurate than other things. It depends on what you play through IRIS of course, since that is what IRIS uses to determine what it should artificially create in the higher regions.

But the base-line of it all obviously is whether audiophile people can actually hear the HiRes content, and this study from Queen Mary University of London says that they can:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0627214255.htm

So those are the 3 different main uses I think IRIS can be good for.
Old 1st September 2020
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by garfield78 View Post
I do not want to put "oil on the fire" but before criticizing the iris developer, some people on the forum , better try the plugin before giving a review. Or maybe they have "****" in their ears. Personally with an average quality headset, and even at 48khz I can hear the difference. Certainly it is subtle on some pieces of music, but on others it is obvious. Of course, if you listen to the latest "ava max" style productions, iris cannot come to the "rescue" of a bad recording .....even if i like ava max
Thanks for the support Garfield78

It's good that people question things though, even though I obviously don't like to be at the wrong and pointy side of the gun

The debate about HiRes is already very controversial though, so it's not entirely unexpected that some people would see red lights flashing here.
But the demo is there, so anybody can check it out empirically

I haven't heard any music by Ava Max, but I will check it out
Old 2nd September 2020
  #23
DSK
Lives for gear
 
DSK's Avatar
This plugin is quite interesting and works in a transparent manner, while still being able to distinguish what it does.
This is when generating hi freq from a 48khz recording to a 96khz one, on monitors that go up to 40khz and at least one of my ear still works full range heh

My only real gripe besides the intended targeting of this plugin is the pricing.
While I do understand the costs of living in Denmark are pretty high, and taxes are more than a third, as you said with just a few sales here and there's not gonna matter so much. Instead if you deduct 37,5% from a few thousand sales at a lower pricepoint, the math will definitely be in your favor.

IMO from a business stand point I would rethink the front end of your plugins (GUI website etc) and your marketing approach as well.
I might get this sometimes in the future, but for now the demo is a bit distracting (I find the level drops a bit too often)

If you wish your tools to remain some hidden treasures of the VST world, with only a few enthusiast purchasing them than by all means don't change your operation. Personally I find it very sincere and refreshing in this overproduced, overmarketed landscape of fac simile GUIs and trendy cool websites to see a small plugin developer focusing on the technical side so much.

While I do understand Javahut's point regarding your target audience, I think it's a stretch to say that your intentions were to mislead, scam etc.

I think an easy solution to the moral issue regarding true Hi-res vs Synthesized Hi-res is to have an "upscale" tag that artists should use when uploading.
This way the listener would know, just like in DVD reissues that the audio has been "tampered" with and it's not in it's original recorded form.
Old 2nd September 2020
  #24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSK View Post
This plugin is quite interesting and works in a transparent manner, while still being able to distinguish what it does.
This is when generating hi freq from a 48khz recording to a 96khz one, on monitors that go up to 40khz and at least one of my ear still works full range heh

My only real gripe besides the intended targeting of this plugin is the pricing.
While I do understand the costs of living in Denmark are pretty high, and taxes are more than a third, as you said with just a few sales here and there's not gonna matter so much. Instead if you deduct 37,5% from a few thousand sales at a lower pricepoint, the math will definitely be in your favor.

IMO from a business stand point I would rethink the front end of your plugins (GUI website etc) and your marketing approach as well.
I might get this sometimes in the future, but for now the demo is a bit distracting (I find the level drops a bit too often)

If you wish your tools to remain some hidden treasures of the VST world, with only a few enthusiast purchasing them than by all means don't change your operation. Personally I find it very sincere and refreshing in this overproduced, overmarketed landscape of fac simile GUIs and trendy cool websites to see a small plugin developer focusing on the technical side so much.

While I do understand Javahut's point regarding your target audience, I think it's a stretch to say that your intentions were to mislead, scam etc.

I think an easy solution to the moral issue regarding true Hi-res vs Synthesized Hi-res is to have an "upscale" tag that artists should use when uploading.
This way the listener would know, just like in DVD reissues that the audio has been "tampered" with and it's not in it's original recorded form.
Thanks for your feedback, DSK.

Yes, the whole marketing/advertising/business side of things could certainly need some TLC

It's not a goal to keep the plugins hidden, but getting into marketing on a more serious scale is likely to require more effort and money than I can muster at the moment. I'm doing the whole thing on my free-time, so it's already taking quite a chunk of that.

The webpage is intentionally 'old-school'. Not because I prefer it old-school, but because I want to keep it as 'disabled-friendly' as possible, and a lot of more modern web-designs are not as compatible with screen-readers and similar software used by people with impaired vision or blindness as the current 'old' design is.

It's anything but friendly to edit though, lol, since I have to do it in a manual text-editor.
But anyway, that's a compromise I've chosen to go with for now.

About your idea about labeling music as 'true' or 'generated' HiRes; I would be all for that.

The purpose is not to hide the fact that IRIS creates an artificial effect, so if HD-music websites could somehow mark music in such ways that would be cool.
It would probably have to happen at aggregator-level though, since that's where people upload their music, but I suppose such infra-structure could be setup relatively easily (Some check-box in the meta-data section I suppose could work, where you enter ISRC-codes and all that other registration stuff)

Yes, the sound-drop every minute is a demo-compromise. I've been using that method ever since I began making audio-plugins, and it's obviously about finding some method that is intrusive enough to get people to buy the plugin, but not so intrusive that it makes the demo completely unusable. But it's tough to find something that pleases everybody in that regard.

Thanks for sharing your test-results
I'm obviously very pleased with your findings, since that's of course the real heart of the matter for me
Old 15th September 2020
  #25
Here for the gear
So is it just a specialised exciter? Could it be used as an exciter?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #26
Lives for gear
 
Mark D.'s Avatar
 

Can anyone please post a before / after example of this in use where we can hear the results? Thanks.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliteevil View Post
So is it just a specialised exciter? Could it be used as an exciter?
I did not get any notification that you had posted here, so sorry for not replying sooner.

There is a demo you can try, so you can hear for yourself if the effect is anything for you


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark D. View Post
Can anyone please post a before / after example of this in use where we can hear the results? Thanks.
There is a demo that you can try.

I won't do a before/after myself (Other than the images you can see on the webpage) since I'm obviously biased in favor of the plugin
But if somebody else wants to give the demo a go and create such an example (or examples if you want), then it would certainly be interesting to see what results they get
Old 3 weeks ago
  #28
Lives for gear
 
doom64's Avatar
Just ran a copy of The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop" through this. Now it sounds like a Green Day "Insomniac" era recording!*

Thank you, IRIS! My eyes are open to the future of audio.




*Sarcasm

In all seriousness, this looks interesting enough to try out.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by doom64 View Post
Just ran a copy of The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop" through this. Now it sounds like a Green Day "Insomniac" era recording!*

Thank you, IRIS! My eyes are open to the future of audio.




*Sarcasm
When my grand-dad lived he used to tell us kids that when HE was a kid all they had to play with was 2 wooden sticks
I'm glad we've progressed a bit since then



Quote:
Originally Posted by doom64 View Post
In all seriousness, this looks interesting enough to try out.
Thanks

I am actually sorry there hasn't been more actual test-feedback of this. I obviously know the results I get from it myself, but nothing beats multiple-user feedback coming from their using it on their types of material and systems and gear they have and so on.

The only way to truly know if you've done a plugin that is actually more broadly useful, is when you have 'outside' or 'external' feedback.
It's also the only way I can find potential weak-spots.

But yeah, I suppose the plugin is perhaps a bit scary, or not conformed enough to what the majority of people goes for these days, or maybe it's just too controversial, to some.

Anyway, it's there now and it's not leaving, so whenever you're ready; give it a try
Take care.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #30
Lives for gear
 
doom64's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEL View Post
I am actually sorry there hasn't been more actual test-feedback of this. I obviously know the results I get from it myself, but nothing beats multiple-user feedback coming from their using it on their types of material and systems and gear they have and so on.

The only way to truly know if you've done a plugin that is actually more broadly useful, is when you have 'outside' or 'external' feedback.
It's also the only way I can find potential weak-spots.

But yeah, I suppose the plugin is perhaps a bit scary, or not conformed enough to what the majority of people goes for these days, or maybe it's just too controversial, to some.

Anyway, it's there now and it's not leaving, so whenever you're ready; give it a try
Take care.
I like the Waves Signature Series plugins for when I need a mix "done yesterday" so yeah, I will probably like yours as well. Would you prefer a Gearslutz private message for feedback or...?
📝 Reply
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
🖨️ Show Printable Version
✉️ Email this Page
🔍 Search thread
🎙️ View mentioned gear
Forum Jump
Forum Jump